Category: Recruitment

UK region in every sector outstrips job postings for 2020

The latest reports from Reed.co.uk, have stated that over 3.3 million jobs were added onto its website in 2021 – that’s a whopping 1.5 million more than 2020 which equates to a year-on-year rise of 97%!

Reed.co.uk also reported a 25% increase in new jobs posted last year compared with 2019, when 2.7 million jobs were recorded before the start of the pandemic.

September saw the most amounts of job postings with 357,489 created which was an increase of 150% compared to 2020 and 60% compared to 2019.

Similarly in December which is month where job postings usually fall in the lead up to the holidays and new year recorded nearly  350,000 new live vacancies. December was the second most active month of 2021 and a 151% and 132% increase on 2020 and 2019’s figures respectively.

Job postings in every sector on Reed.co.uk were up year-on-year compared to 2020, with Customer Service (510%) and Transport & Logistics (337%) seeing the highest percentage increases, followed by Banking (305%), Strategy & Consultancy (255%), Hospitality & Catering (176%), Retail (170%) and Manufacturing (136%).

In terms of the number of new jobs created, Transport & Logistics was the most active sector in 2021 with 376,000 jobs posted, followed by Customer Service (338,954), IT & Telecoms (264,184), Education (256,301) and Health & Medicine (168,558).

Further evidence of a jobs boom was reported by Reed.co.uk through its regional analysis of job vacancies on the site. Every region across the UK saw job vacancies for last year outstrip 2020 and nearly all saw more jobs added than before the pandemic. South East England and London were the most active regions for job postings with both seeing over half a million new vacancies added last year, a 77% and 108% increase year-on-year, respectively.

Recent analysis of Reed.co.uk’s jobs data also suggests that the ongoing jobs boom will continue into 2022, with over 32,000 jobs live on the site in 24-hours on the first Tuesday of the new year – a new record.

James Reed, chairman of Reed Recruitment commented: “As we move into 2022, the momentum which has built up in the jobs market is showing no signs of slowing down either. It is now the best time in fifty years to look for a new job. In this newly established sellers’ market, jobseekers hold all the cards and should feel empowered to find new opportunities whether to explore different industries, improve work-life balance, increase wages or boost career prospects. I urge anyone thinking of switching career to explore the opportunities available to them.”

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A big headcount increase is planned for 2022

Arctic Shores, the psychometric assessment company, have announced that it has received £1.5m in venture debt funding from Silicon Valley Bank (SVB).

The raise is said to be used to support Arctic Shores’ aim of ‘changing the way the world sees potential’ in a time where 91% of employers are struggling to find talent amid the skills shortage. The investment will position Arctic Shores to enable employers see more in people that previous experience, with a platform that ‘is built to look beyond past experience, and uncover true potential at work.’

The funding will allow further growth and Arctic Shores is said to be increasing their headcount by a further 20 staff throughout the year.

Arctic Shores joins Wise, HelloFresh and GoCardless as the latest high-growth, tech-enabled organisations supported by SVB.

Robert Newry, CEO of Arctic Shores, commented: “The global skills shortage shows that it’s never been more vital to hire for potential. But, for employers, that requires one big step – scrapping the CV. It might feel like a tough ask. But unless we free ourselves from irrelevant and outdated experience, we’ll never unleash the vast potential of the untapped many, who have the quality but lack the experience. That’s why, with SVB’s support, we’re excited to show the world that it’s not only possible to see more in people, but, with our Talent Discovery Platform, simple and affordable too.”

Ben Tickler, Director of Venture & Growth at Silicon Valley Bank UK Branch, also made comment: “Arctic Shores is an exciting Manchester-based innovation company, and it has been great to be able to support them on their impressive journey of rapid growth. We look forward to a continued partnership with the team as they look to scale further.”

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Companies in the creative sector looking for talent for growth

Data compiled by creative, digital and marketing recruitment specialists, Aquent, has shown that UK salaries are surging as the economy comes back to life.

The collated data from placements made in the UK during 2021 indicate that companies have engaged in the hiring ‘rush’ that has continued to gain momentum since spring and those working in creative industries have a glimpse into next year’s job market in Aquent’s 2022 salary guide.

The data from this year’s salaries paints a very different picture to the job market in 2020 where stagnating wages and impending redundancies were seen in the advertising and creative industries. According to the report, the recent ‘boom’ in wages is down to a number of factors, including a skills shortage which has resulted in midweight roles pushing for higher salaries.

Companies that have survived the pandemic are searching for talent for further growth; but in the current market, candidates often have multiple job offers and ask for higher salaries to sweeten the deal. Aquent’s data found that in order to make a move to a new role, 42% of talent wanted a 16% to 30% salary increase before tendering their resignation.

UX and CX continue to call the shots

Much like 202, those working in UX and CX design still hold the ‘golden ticket’ in terms of the most sought-after roles. Data from Aquent found that only 20% of UX, CX and Service Design talent are looking for a new role yet 65% would be willing to leave for the right offer.

Salary increases are as follows: junior UX designers and midweight UX designers have increased by 33%; while top-end senior UX designer salaries have risen by 50% (£80k to £120k).

In some cases, senior UX architects have seen salaries double, from 60k in 2021 to £120k, a 50% rise. Compared to data from five years ago, UX architects have seen a 150% increase and senior UX designers a 70% increase in wages since 2016.

Aliza Sweiry, UK managing director, Aquent, commented: “The boost is salaries is welcome news for candidates on the look-out for a new role in 2022. The job market has been turned on its head from the situation last year becoming an ‘employees’ market.

“This is a great time for applicants with itchy feet to explore the job market, we’re seeing candidates ‘flex their muscles’ in terms of what they want and expect from a role and employers are responding with higher salaries and more flexible working options. As always, our salary guides always throw up interesting insights and this year has been no different. It will be fascinating to see how the industry responds this time next year.”

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But will Omicron undo gains made in the economy?  

According to the latest unemployment stats released by ONS, there were 29.4m employees in the UK. This is an increase of 257,000 on revised October 2021 figures and up 424,000 on pre-pandemic February 2020 figures.

However, ONS stated that redundancies made at the end of the furlough scheme could be included in the Real Time Information (RTI) data for a few more months. But responses to the business survey, stated that redundancy numbers are likely to be a small number of those employees still on furlough at the end of September.

The latest Labour Force Survey indicates that employment rose by 0.2 percentage points from August to October with the number of part-time workers decreasing dramatically during the pandemic.

Decreasing employment rates among young people (those aged 16 to 24 years) have been notable during the pandemic, with unemployment and economic inactivity rates increasing by more than for those aged 25 years and over. But according to the survey, there was an increase in the employment rate and a decrease in the unemployment rate to below pre-coronavirus rates.

Numbers of job vacancies continued to rise to a new record of 1,219m jobs – that is an astounding increase of 434,500 from pre-COVID figures of January to March of 2020.

Neil Carberry, Chief Executive of the Recruitment & Employment Confederation (REC), commented: “The issue of labour shortages is hugely challenging for employers right now, as vacancies continue to hit new highs and unemployment remains low. But the real elephant in the room is rising inactivity and a smaller UK workforce – people either not in the UK or not looking for work. Reflecting this, overall hours worked are still well below our pre-pandemic numbers. This is a huge challenge to business and government. New approaches to recruitment and workforce planning are needed – and genuine partnership between government and employers on skills, unemployment support and sensible immigration rules.

“We don’t know yet how the Omicron variant will affect the jobs market, but it is clear that supporting businesses to retain staff and maintain cashflow was a successful strategy in 2020, and we may need to dust off those plans again if we are headed for a longer period of restrictions.”

James Reed, chairman of Reed, also commented: “There’s been plenty of talk from doomsayers that the Omicron variant will plunge us back into economic despair, but the outlook appears much more optimistic now compared with the first COVID-19 wave we faced in March 2020.”

He continued: “While some may want you to think the omicron variant has tipped the battle against COVID-19 in the virus’s favour, the reality is that, according to our jobs data, there are better opportunities and better negotiations for workers to have with employers than ever before. It’s currently the best time in fifty years to look for a new job and I’d urge anyone thinking of a change in career to begin their search for a fresh start in the new year.”

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App has placed 100,000 workers in nine months

Jobandtalent, a workforce marketplace that matches workers with temporary roles, has announced that it secured $500 million in equity investment from Kinnevik and SoftBank Vision Fund 2 to facilitate its expansion into the US. The move will significantly increase the size of its tech and sales teams over the next 24 months.

Jobandtalent’s app matches workers with temporary roles at companies in a range of sectors including logistics, e-commerce, warehousing, and manufacturing. As the marketplace grows, the AI learns and makes even more precise matches which means even more workers finding and staying in jobs and reducing a company’s attrition rate.

More than 1,300 companies, including DHL, FedEx, XPO, Ceva Logistics, eBay, IKEA, Kuehne & Nagel, JD Sports, Ocado, Sainsbury’s, Argos and GLS make use of the Jobandtalent.

Juan Urdiales, co-founder and CEO of Jobandtalent commented: “With temporary working increasingly becoming the norm, the opportunity to help workers find reliable, consistent jobs is growing by the day. The Jobandtalent platform has found the right roles at the right companies for more than 100,000 workers in the first nine months of 2021 alone, providing them with the benefits and security of full-time employment. We are excited to accelerate the expansion of our team and grow our presence in both new and existing markets – helping more workers find the jobs they want, and helping businesses fill the roles they need.”

Natalie Tydeman, Senior Investment Director at Kinnevik, said: “Jobandtalent’s workforce-as-a-service platform is disrupting the modern labour market and placing people back at the centre of employment. By offering a personalised service driven by data and proprietary technology, Jobandtalent is simplifying the experience of finding work for thousands of people and transforming it for the better. We’re proud to be working with Juan and the team to accelerate the growth of the business.”

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5.2% of Hispanics remain unemployed based on November stats

According to a recent report by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment rose by 210,000 in November as the U.S. unemployment rate fell to 4.2%. This is well below the half-million gain that had been expected. The number of unemployed persons fell by 542,000 to 6.9 million and the market saw a marked increase in jobs in professional and business services, transportation and warehousing, construction, and manufacturing while employment in the retail sector declined. Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (4%), adult women (4%), whites (3.7%), blacks (6.7%), and hispanics (5.2%) declined in November.

Karen Fichuk, CEO of Randstaf North America and Randstad N.V. executive board member commented: “We’re continuing to see a surge in job postings, record low unemployment rates and historically high levels of workers changing jobs and careers. Together these trends are creating new opportunities for workers, as smart employers cater to workers who have come to expect a better work-life balance, higher salaries, and more flexibility. At the same time, the rise of the Omicron variant will renew employee concerns about health and safety measures and threaten to pump the brakes on the current acceleration of the job market.”

Detailed outlook on where jobs grew in November:

• Professional and business services added 90,000 jobs.

• Employment in transportation and warehousing increased by 50,000 and is 210,000 above its February 2020 level.

• Construction employment rose by 31,000 jobs.

• Manufacturing added 31,000 jobs.

• Employment in financial activities continued to trend up in November (+13,000) and is 30,000 above its February 2020 level.

• Employment in the retail sector declined by 20,000 with job losses in general merchandise stores (-20,000); clothing and clothing accessories stores (-18,000); and sporting goods, hobby, book, and music stores (-9,000).

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50% of workers taking leave in December
According to the latest from CV-Library, a UK independent job board, Government’s advice to carry on with Christmas plans is welcome news to UK professionals.

The survey revealed that just over 50% of UK workers are planning to take time off this Christmas with 38.5% of those doing so purely to make up for spending Christmas in lockdown in 2020. Workers want to make the most of the festive season and spend time with family, friends and loved ones, having been denied the opportunity in 2020.

Of the 2,000 respondents, 74% reported that they are not offered any incentive to work over the Christmas period with 55% admitting that they really don’t enjoy working at this time.

Respondents were asked what the pros and cons were and CV-Library has exclusively revealed the results:

Worst things about working over Christmas (based on top three answers) 

  1. 77% Missing out on spending time with family and friends
  2. 22% Missing out on Christmas parties
  3. 22% Having to stay in the festive spirit, even though you’d rather be at home
  4. 20% Irritable/stressed customers and clients
  5. 17% Working longer hours

Best things about working over Christmas (based on top 3 answers) 

  1. 40% Christmas bonuses
  2. 33% Christmas music
  3. 28% A more relaxed working environment
  4. 25% Staff social events
  5. 4% Jolly customers

Secret Santa has also been impacted by the pandemic. A mere 27% of professionals say they will be playing the game in their workplace this year, with 23% admitting they used to, but have stopped since the onset of the pandemic.

Lee Biggins, Founder and CEO of CV-Library commented: “Profits are vital, but a balance is required. The commitment and efforts of staff are key to success, and acknowledgment of this has never been more crucial. With staff retention a big issue, and much movement predicted for the 2022 job market, staff need to feel appreciated, motivated, and able to enjoy the festive period this year, where possible.”

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Older households in the UK spend more

In new reports published by the International Longevity Centre UK (ILC), it’s found that longer lives could be crucial in European pandemic recovery and highlight the economic opportunities of longer lives across Europe.

According to the reports, older people’s contributions across the European region are significant, and growing:

  • In Germany, 77% of people aged between 50 and 64 are in employment
  • In France, nearly 1 in 3 workers are aged 50 and over.
  • By 2035, almost 3 in 5 (59%) of workers could be aged 50 and over in Italy
  • Over 6 out of every 10 euros in the Spanish economy were spent by households led by those aged 50+ in 2015
  • By 2040, 63p in every pound in the UK economy will be spent by older households.

According to the report, however, there is a key barrier to realising these opportunities and that is poor health which limits people’s ability to stay active as they get older.

Comparing countries across the G2o, the “Health equals wealth” reports highlight that:

In countries that spend more on health, older people work, spend and volunteer more.

Increasing preventative health spending by just 0.1 percentage can unlock a 9% increase in annual spending by older people and an additional 10 hours of volunteering each year.

In a recent story published by TALiNT International, it’s believed the key to unlocking the skills shortage crisis is to upskill the older workforce.

The reports reveal the need for countries to better support older people’s economic contributions, particularly through greater investment in preventative health measures that support healthy ageing. It’s proposed that governments invest at least 6% of their health budgets on interventions, such as vaccines, screenings, early detection and management of disease.

Earlier this year, the European Commission adopted its Green Paper on Ageing, which set out a vision for countries to adapt to their ageing populations, including how to support healthy ageing.

However, to date, there have been no announcements of an intended White Paper or binding commitments. An open letter sent last week by the ILC Europe Network, a pan-European network on longevity, called on the Commission to ensure this is followed up by concrete and meaningful action.

“It’s vital that this Green Paper should not be put on a shelf to gather dust, but instead be a step towards a concerted European response to ageing. [We are] calling for an EU White Paper on Ageing that commits to making European policy and practice work for all ages”, call the signatories.

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Burnout continues to fuel the retention crisis

According to its latest study, McKinsey & Company has reported that more than 15 million US workers have quit their jobs since April 2021 with 40% of employees saying that they’re likely to quit in the next three to six months. This, because of burnout, the study revealed.

According to McKinsey, the pandemic has led to employee retention struggles that require serious reconsideration of how employers address mental well-being and they’re calling it the “Great Attrition”.

The largest-of-its-kind study released recently by leadership consulting firm DDI surveyed more than 15,000 employees and 2,000 HR professionals across 24 industries. The study found that nearly 60% of leaders reported feeling used up at the end of the workday.

Burnout has long been a concern for employers, and “leaders who are feeling burnout are now nearly four times more likely to leave their positions within the next year,” according to DDI. The length of the pandemic and the sustained effort required to keep companies afloat through uncertain times (and virtually) have increased exhaustion and stress. Meanwhile, the lines of work/life balance have blurred, families are facing increased financial anxiety, and the pandemic has put a strain on marriages and parents.

Staff need more support, but what does the ideal support system look like? 

In today’s mental wellbeing landscape, support typically starts with professional care but this model of care is problematic because according to Benefit News, in the US, those needing mental health support have to wait an average of 19 days to been seen and only “if one of the 12% of therapists accepting new patients are in the person’s network”. Stigma and fear of repercussions also play a role; 40% of first responders, for example, say they don’t seek help from workplace services because they are afraid of getting fired.

Employers can be the leaders in making proactive mental health care accessible to Americans by doing the following:

  1. Implement meditation spaces and courses in the workplace is one solution. Sixty percentof employees experiencing anxiety in the workplace show marked improvement upon practicing meditation. Many workplaces are already introducing corporate mindfulness classes to their benefits, with stunning results.
  2. Champion overall health. Because stress has also been associated with poor eating behaviors and diet quality (both causing it and being caused by it), nutrition and exercise are key. It’s not reasonable to expect an employee working a nine-hour workday to have time to go to the gym after work, make a healthy dinner from scratch, and also spend time with his or her family without feeling burned out. If workplaces offered healthy meal options at work, and even nutrition courses, it could make a world of difference; it’s also important to create a culture that encourages physical activity during

The arrival of the pandemic brought with it isolation and real human connection is at the lowest point in history. Many family members live in different states or countries, and according to NPR, more than 60% of Americans say they are lonely.

McKinsey’s study revealed that this increase in loneliness has impacted people’s personal and professional lives and made workers more susceptible to burnout. This is especially true for non-White employees, who are “more likely than their White counterparts to say they had left because they didn’t feel they belonged at their companies.”

The bottom line

Workplaces can address the fundamental need for connection by acknowledging the connection between loneliness and burnout; rethinking workplace environments to allow for more socialization and communal working; creating peer-to-peer mentorship programs; introducing ways for employees to volunteer together for a company-backed social cause; or using a platform like Listeners On Call that enables employees to talk to trained listeners with a shared life experience anonymously and confidentially. Also, the platform has the ability to meet employees where they are today on their own personal journey of wellness.

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Skills shortages reported in the Kingdom

A recent report by Hays, the global recruiting experts, has revealed that Saudi Arabia’s construction and real estate market is showing signs of recovery and growth following a period of subdued activity in response to COVID-19.

Lockdown measures and travel restrictions have limited workforce capabilities and drastically reduced the global demand for oil forced the government to make budget cutbacks resulting in many construction and real estate projects being put on hold. Eighteen months on however, the economy has bounced back.

Since the beginning of 2021, there have been positive signs of growth with statistics from Reuters showing that the economy grew by 1.5% year-on-year as of Q3, with the non-oil revenue sector returning to pre-pandemic levels, growing by 10.1%. These figures, together with the high vaccine rollout and easing of travel restrictions, have provoked much optimism in the Kingdom. It remains to be seen how the discovery of Omicron will affect global economic recovery in the coming months.

Like the rest of the globe, hiring activity is back to pre-pandemic level and this is no different in the Kingdom while the next 12 months set to surge far beyond these levels. The local unemployment rate has hit a new 10-year low of 11.7% and is on track to reach the government’s target of 7% by 2030, although it seems the skills shortage is a global phenomenon.

Skills in demand

Saudi has not been immune to skills shortages. In line with the Kingdom’s vision to become a global leader within investment, tourism and trade, demand for the world’s very best talent is high. Hays has reported a demand for large-scale project experience in the following sectors:

  1. Design / Pre-construction
  2. Project delivery
  3. Digital technology

 

What candidates want

Talent attraction is key and Hays has reported that candidates are looking for competitive salaries with good benefits packages; job security; and efficient onboarding processes.

What employers want

Hiring trends in Saudi reflect its ambitious 2030 vision, with highly driven, highly skilled professionals being the most in demand. Employers look for candidates who have worked on major, multi-billion US$ projects which are similar in nature and end-use to those they will be working on.

According to Hays, candidates must also have experience working with innovative tech, demonstrate a track record of delivering projects / phases from inception to completion, and a proven success in senior leadership positions.

Hays says that being able to showcase this experience in a meaningful way is incredibly important too and they advise candidates to highlight how their skills and experiences align to the role they are applying for.

Aaron Fletcher, Business Manager – Saudi Arabia, Hays commented: “In line with the Kingdom’s vision to become a global leader within investment, tourism and trade, demand for the world’s very best talent is high and there is typically a shortage of supply of such talent in the region. As such, benefits paid in addition to salary are typically most generous in Saudi Arabia compared to the rest of the Gulf region. Relocation, housing and education allowances are offered as part of a standard employment package in Saudi Arabia.”

 

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