Tag: Contract workforce

Oxford, Sheffield, and Worcester workers report working the longest days

Recent research commissioned by workspace brokerage Office Freedom has revealed that 87% of workers are working longer hours than they are contracted to. In addition, most have agreed that they are doing more when working from home.

Two thousand office workers participated in the survey to uncover working habits across the UK. The survey compared trends and patterns between cities, regions, ages, and genders.

According to the survey:

  • Workers in Oxford, Sheffield, and Worcester have the longest working day, at an average length of 7.3 hours.
  • Over 80% of respondents work more than they are contracted to.
  • 28% of men state that they work more hours than contracted daily, compared to 13% of females.
  • 63% of workers take a maximum of 30 minutes for lunch. Workers in the West Midlands take the longest break, whereas workers in the South West take the shortest breaks at an average of 25 minutes.
  • One-third of workers are taking longer lunch breaks when working from home.
  • Despite the long working days and employees putting more hours into their jobs, 37% of workers feel they are not rewarded for doing a good job.
  • Common benefits among all employees are high street discounts, health and wellbeing initiatives, insurance, and extra holidays.
  • 45% of respondents rated their company highly for being appreciative, with companies in Scotland being the most highly rated.
  • Across all regions, 67% of respondents enjoy where they work.
  • Younger workers are more likely to enjoy where they work than those aged 35 and over.
  • Since working from home and hybrid working were introduced, most employees state that they enjoy working more than previously.
  • 42% would be disappointed to return to five days in the office.

A spokesperson from Office Freedom said: “It seems that the flexibility of hybrid working has enabled more people to enjoy their jobs and take away some of the day-to-day stresses, like commuting, for example.”

“Rather than spending hours on the train or in the car, it’s apparent many would rather put that time back into their working day.”

“This new way of working is here to stay, especially now that the benefits have been realised by both companies and employees. Inevitably, working habits have changed for the better and it’s now time for companies to embrace the shift and ensure their initiatives and expectations align with the new norm.”

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Identify fraud poses major security risks for businesses

The US government has reported that North Koreans are hiding their identities in order to get contract jobs in the global technology sector and subsequently warned that such workers pose major security risks to businesses.

The US Department of State, the US Department of the Treasury, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation issued the advisory for the international community, the private sector, and the public to warn of attempts by Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, a.k.a. North Korea) IT workers to obtain employment while posing as non-North Korean nationals. It’s said that there are reputational risks and the potential for legal consequences, including sanctions designation under US and United Nations authorities, for individuals and entities engaged in or supporting DPRK IT worker-related activity and processing related financial transactions, the advisory stated.

The Government stated: “The DPRK dispatches thousands of highly skilled IT workers around the world to generate revenue that contributes to its weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missile programs, in violation of US and UN sanctions. These IT workers take advantage of existing demands for specific IT skills, such as software and mobile application development, to obtain freelance employment contracts from clients around the world, including in North America, Europe, and East Asia.”

In many cases, DPRK IT workers represent themselves as US-based and/or non-North Korean teleworkers. The workers may further obfuscate their identities and/or location by sub-contracting work to non-North Koreans. Although DPRK IT workers normally engage in IT work distinct from malicious cyber activity, they have used the privileged access gained as contractors to enable the DPRK’s malicious cyber intrusions. Additionally, there are likely instances where workers are subjected to forced labor.”

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App has placed 100,000 workers in nine months

Jobandtalent, a workforce marketplace that matches workers with temporary roles, has announced that it secured $500 million in equity investment from Kinnevik and SoftBank Vision Fund 2 to facilitate its expansion into the US. The move will significantly increase the size of its tech and sales teams over the next 24 months.

Jobandtalent’s app matches workers with temporary roles at companies in a range of sectors including logistics, e-commerce, warehousing, and manufacturing. As the marketplace grows, the AI learns and makes even more precise matches which means even more workers finding and staying in jobs and reducing a company’s attrition rate.

More than 1,300 companies, including DHL, FedEx, XPO, Ceva Logistics, eBay, IKEA, Kuehne & Nagel, JD Sports, Ocado, Sainsbury’s, Argos and GLS make use of the Jobandtalent.

Juan Urdiales, co-founder and CEO of Jobandtalent commented: “With temporary working increasingly becoming the norm, the opportunity to help workers find reliable, consistent jobs is growing by the day. The Jobandtalent platform has found the right roles at the right companies for more than 100,000 workers in the first nine months of 2021 alone, providing them with the benefits and security of full-time employment. We are excited to accelerate the expansion of our team and grow our presence in both new and existing markets – helping more workers find the jobs they want, and helping businesses fill the roles they need.”

Natalie Tydeman, Senior Investment Director at Kinnevik, said: “Jobandtalent’s workforce-as-a-service platform is disrupting the modern labour market and placing people back at the centre of employment. By offering a personalised service driven by data and proprietary technology, Jobandtalent is simplifying the experience of finding work for thousands of people and transforming it for the better. We’re proud to be working with Juan and the team to accelerate the growth of the business.”

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55% of businesses make use of the contract workforce

Based on a survey of over 4,500 people, Sonovate’s Future World of Work report reveals that freelance and contract work is on the rise post-pandemic, but 31% of SMEs routinely pay them late; with more than half of those freelancers and contractors stating that late payments impact their ability to pay their bills on time.

While small and medium sized SME owners are keen to attract contractor workers to address skills gaps failing to pay them on time could lead to them missing out on talent opportunities.

The survey revealed that 74% of SMEs said they see the benefits of hiring freelance or contract workers for specialist support over having to invest in a permanent workforce.

Over 40% of SMEs that use freelance labour admitted they often wait until the last day the payment is due before paying contractors. However, this isn’t necessarily the business owners’ fault with half (50%) saying that late payments from clients or customers impact their ability to pay their workforce on time. 

Sonovate’s research shows that over half (55%) of SMEs that use freelance labour have witnessed a sharp increase in the number of people looking for temporary or contract work since the start of the pandemic with nearly four in ten workers (36%) saying they would like to move to a more flexible way of working but are worried about the uncertainty of pay. Over half (56%) said they would only work for a company which had a track record of paying wages on time and 64% think the Government needs to do more to enforce the prompt payment of invoices. Almost half of freelancers (48%) refuse to continue to work with businesses that are late to pay them. 

Richard Prime, co-founder and co-CEO at Sonovate, commented: “The Report shows us that freelance and contract workers have spiked in popularity since the start of the pandemic, with the crisis opening our eyes to new ways of working.” 

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