Tag: DE&I

The Top 100 Staffing Companies issue of TALiNT International is out now! This latest edition of the go-to read in the total talent ecosystem is a true collaboration that not only celebrates the incredible growth that staffing firms have yielded over the last year, but is also a culmination of commentary and insight from members of TALiNT Partners’ membership programme, guest contributors and more.

The jewel in this crown is most certainly the the Top 100 Staffing Companies rankings. TALiNT Partners ranked staffing firms in the UK according to turnover and they’re delighted to see several TALiNT Partners members come out on top!

We spoke to Ben Kaminsky, Founder and CEO of EVA.AI | Powering HR 4.0, and discussed the conversational and predictive AI that engages users from a friendly process automation platform that personalises the digital experiences of candidates.

Other features include Harnessing the hidden workforce which unpacks how recruiters can bring more marginalised talent into the workforce and help employers remove unnecessary barriers to more diverse, resilient, and loyal talent; how DE&I has become an important differentiator for recruiters and why ESG is fast moving to centre stage for recruiters and their clients and much more.

Read the full magazine here: https://hubs.ly/Q01m_cXL0

This issue of the magazine will also be printed in limited numbers and distributed to our members and delegates at the World Leaders in Recruitment Summit on 13th of October.

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First firm to achieve status for entire company

Digital media and marketing recruitment firm, Aspire, is the first staffing company to put its entire team through the APSCo Inclusive+ Recruiter training programme.

The course deals with the challenges that recruiters face in supporting their clients to attract and retain a more diverse workforce, including:

  • Building confidence and making the business case for ED&I
  • Supporting clients on their ED&I journey
  • Unconscious bias and how it impacts the recruitment process
  • Attracting diverse and underrepresented talent through inclusive job ads and building an inclusive brand
  • Inclusive recruitment practices, what they are, and how to implement them
  • An introduction to the Equality Act and the most important elements to consider before and during recruitment.

The training programme is designed for the recruitment sector and delivered by the Association of Professional Staffing Companies (APSCo). Adam Tobias from Inventum Group designed it.

Paul Farrer, Founder of Aspire, commented: “As a business, diversity and inclusion is part of our core. Not only have we inserted diversity clauses into our client terms, but we’ve also built diversity into our own people development and culture. As a sector that is so heavily involved in, and responsible for, building diverse workforces, it makes absolute sense that recruiters themselves should have an understanding of diversity, inclusion, biases and equality. Historically we’ve had a diversity task force in place to both audit our business and keep ED&I at the top of our agenda, for this reason our new starters are also required to go through our own diversity training. We also support the APSCo Embrace Forum to help drive diversity across recruitment and I am sure those members will take a lead and follow suit.”

“While diversity training is a must for recruiters working directly with candidates, we put all staff forward for Inclusive+ Recruiter as it is our responsibility as business leaders to embrace and encourage diversity for all, therefore all our UK people regardless of level or job role are now accredited. I would highly recommend this training for others in the staffing sector. It’s tailored specifically to recruiters, which means it’s not only highly targeted, but it also provides tangible takeaways that staff can implement. Hats off to Adam Tobias and APSCO for developing this practical initiative.”

Ann Swain, CEO of APSCo added: “Recruiters have a crucial role to play in improving diversity, equity and inclusion in global workforces. We developed this training to help equip staff in the sector with the tools to be more diverse and I’m delighted with the response we’ve had since Inclusive+ Recruiter was launched. To see Aspire put its entire business through the training is testament to the firm’s commitment and passion to the cause.”

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70% of respondents say their organisation should do better in terms of diversity

New research by released by Thoughtworks, a global technology consultancy, has revealed that employees in the tech sector believe that their employers are not doing enough to prioritise gender equality, this despite the clear ethical, social and business benefits for doing so.

Alarmingly, the national survey of 500 employees from UK tech and software companies found just two in five (41%) of organisations in the sector had a plan in place to improve gender equality in the workplace.

In terms of initiatives, only 23% of people in the tech sector said their organisations had a return-to-work programme for working parents and carers, while 27% offered diversity and inclusion training.  Just one in four organisations (25%) offered mentoring for employees.

Overall, three in five respondents believed that their organisation should be doing better in terms of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI). Around half (51%) said their organisation was behind the industry with 16% believing their company has no plan to address DEI issues at work.

Despite these concerns, the vast majority of employees in the IT sector (87%) agreed there are business benefits from championing DEI issues. Two in five say that it would foster better employee relationships (39%), with the same proportion believing it would increase staff retention (38%). At a time when skills shortage in the UK tech sector is up 191% compared to the same period for 2020[1], the need for initiatives that will positively improve employee engagement and retention is particularly pressing.

Amy Lynch, head of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Thoughtworks UK commented: “Our research findings make clear that, from an employee perspective, our sector must do more to foster a true sense of equity and diversity.

“If staff are concerned, as this research suggests, then the messages are not getting through. At Thoughtworks, diversity, equity and inclusion are at the heart of our business.

“We decided to partner with WORK180 and go through their endorsement process as a commitment to our public stance on increasing diversity. WORK180 promotes organisational standards that raise the bar for women in the workplace. The work that WORK180 is doing with Endorsed Employers such as Thoughtworks is already having a positive impact, but it’s not over yet.”

Amy Lynch added: “We won’t stop until all women are able to thrive and feel equally valued at work. WORK180 is a hub for like-minded individuals who want to make that change, and who are also searching for employers like Thoughtworks that want to make a real and lasting difference for all women.”

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Asia is leading the way in gender diversity

In recent months, hiring in the financial services industry has hit record numbers globally, with eight major hubs showing increases of 64% in advertised roles. This makes the financial services sector one of the fastest hiring industries post-pandemic, only surpassed by the technology sector.

These findings were revealed in a new report from recruitment consultancy Robert Walters. The report, ‘Hiring Trends in the World’s Leading Financial Services Cities’  looks at the labour market across London, New York, Tokyo, Sydney, Paris, Singapore, Frankfurt, and Hong Kong.

London continues to power ahead as home to the most financial services professionals working in any one city (293,700). However, the AsiaPac region has increased in the last 12 months, with Singapore (250,000), Sydney (167,364), and Tokyo (166,000+) being the most notable cities with high levels of financial services talent.

Job Growth in the Past Year by City

  • London: +101%
  • New York: +78%
  • Tokyo: +77%
  • Singapore: +76%

Job Growth by Region

  • Europe: +62%
  • North America: +60%
  • AsiaPac: +61%

In terms of the greatest numbers of advertised job roles, New York (48,595), London (38,945), and Paris (24,165) are in the lead.

AsiaPac, however, shows the best hiring conditions. Professionals in Sydney (81%), Singapore (76%), Hong Kong (67%), and Tokyo (60%) expressed a high willingness to move roles even with this very tight candidate market.

Asia is also leading the way with gender diversity in the financial services sector. For example, Singapore (46%) has almost 50/50 gender diversity; meanwhile, in Hong Kong, women make up 44% of the banking workforce.

New York (36%) and London (36%) lag with gender diversity. However, they have made strides in cultural, racial, and socio-economic diversity. Many firms in these areas have advanced recruitment programmes to ensure their workforce represents the diversity of the city in which they are based.

Senior hires typically represent around 8-10% of all new hires. Most of the hiring is at junior and mid-management levels. However, the figures for senior hires rose dramatically over the last 12-18 months, with 1 in 3 new hires in banking has been at a senior level in some cities.

  • London: 20% of new hires are for senior roles, an increase of 5%
  • New York: Team/Department Heads were the only area to experience growth in the pandemic (+26%)
  • Tokyo: 19% of new hires are at a senior level
  • Sydney: 28% of new hires are for senior positions, an increase of 5%
  • Paris: 63% growth at Manager-level and above
  • Singapore: 31% of new hires are for a senior role

Toby Fowlston, CEO at Robert Walters comments: “The global financial services system is as solid as it was before the pandemic – and much healthier than after the last crisis in 2008 (GFC).

“Whilst the pandemic did not have the expected harmful financial effects on the global banking industry, it has certainly accelerated change in a multitude of other areas. Digital banking boomed whilst cash use fell, savings expanded and credit card debts were paid-off in record time, remote became a way of working, data-capture and usage is a central business function, and environment and sustainability are now front of mind for customers and regulators.”

“All of this change has led to exponential hiring in the sector – with each hub trying to fight for the same talent at the same time, the results being a fiercely competitive recruitment market like we’ve never seen before, with execs being offered over +30-40% pay increases with the option to work from anywhere in the world.”

“As a whole the global financial services sector has made solid strides in gender diversity – with near half of the entry-level workforce in financial services being women.”

“The task now is to equal representation at the top, where in banking less than a quarter of high-level senior positions are held by women. We are seeing some worthy gains been made in this area, and I think the increasing diversity in senior positions will only help to speed up the rapid rate of innovation and change within the sector.”

“Employers will continue to experience challenges in attracting junior analysts and associates as the traditional appeal of working for a large Financial Services organisation now finds itself in a battle with the lure of a career in a start-up or major tech firm.”

“Reputational issues suffered since the GFC and workplace-related perceptions – around hours, flexibility, and culture – will all need to be addressed head on by financial services firms if they want to build out their future talent pipeline.”

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How can businesses improve inclusivity?

A recent audit of the FTSE100 found that neurodiversity and disability are the areas of diversity most likely to be ignored when it comes to recruitment and employee support. The audit, conducted by Agility in Mind, looked at initiatives announced by FTSE100 companies over the last five years concerning age, disability, gender, mental health, neurodiversity, LGBTQ+, and race.

The audit found that despite 99% of FTSE100 companies having an inclusive mission statement, only 37% have a substantial disability initiative, and only 4% offer a neurodiversity initiative.

In partnership with research house, Censuswide, Agility in Mind then surveyed 250 UK business leaders to explore the disparity between support for diverse groups. The survey found that only 16% of business leaders describe their neurodiversity initiatives as ‘highly effective’, compared to 26% in both race and gender.

Although 15% –  20% of the global population is thought to be neurodivergent, with conditions such as ADHD, autism, dyslexia, dyspraxia, or Tourette syndrome, only 21.7% of autistic people are currently working – making them the least likely to be employed of any disabled group.

Agility in Mind’s ‘Inclusive Growth’ playbook offers a six-step framework for managers struggling to implement this type of organisational change:

  • Remember, your organisation is unique, so simply copying other organisations may not achieve the results you want to see
  • Start with inclusivity in mind by bringing diverse views into the team managing change
  • Set out the characteristics of the organisation you want and share a clear vision for the future
  • Take small steps that are aligned with your vision to achieve real change
  • Iterate, ensuring you learn at each step, and share the lessons across the organisation
  • Make change visible to all, so everyone knows the progress you’re making.

Michelle Meakin, Business Services Director at Agility in Mind, commented:  “We’ve seen progress over the last few years with organisations of all sizes embracing change management processes to become more diverse. Core to this shift is in making sure that companies can build a culture of inclusion, making work accessible to everyone, which is able to scale as they grow.”

“However, where change is harder to track- such as with invisible disabilities or neurodiversity – businesses are still lagging. As the war for talent continues, organisations that are able to tackle this widespread issue are likely to see the most diverse – and productive – teams and reap the clear benefits of building an inclusive business. This is where the agile approach to change management comes to the fore; incremental change, a strong vision of inclusion and how to get there, and an openness to adapting the route are key ingredients to meaningful and lasting progress.”

Toby Mildon, Diversity and Inclusion Architect, said: “The disparity between commitment to nuances of diversity has been an ongoing issue. That only 4% of the FTSE100 offer initiatives to support neurodiverse employees, in comparison to the 47% that offer an LGBTQ+ empowerment initiative or are accredited by a national association for LGBTQ+ rights, is telling of how much work there is still to be done.”

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Half of workers dismiss jobs that do not offer hybrid working

According to new research by IWG, hybrid working is now the most sought-after benefit for job seekers. The research showed large numbers of office workers out flexible working alongside other benefits such as health insurance and group income protection (88%), life insurance (84%), unlimited vacation (76%), and extended parental leave (71%) as important benefits in a new role.

The survey was conducted among 2,000 office workers to understand better the key factors driving jobseekers’ decision-making.

The jobs website Indeed revealed that ‘hybrid’ is one of the fastest-growing search terms, having increased by 6,531% in the last 12 months. In addition, according to IWG’s research, half of workers would immediately dismiss jobs that do not offer hybrid working.

Job seekers also highly value the opportunity to work remotely. Searches for remote work have also risen by 666% and now account for 2.3% of all searches. Sixty percent of respondents stated they would like to work within 15 minutes of their home.

According to the research, office workers’ top five considerations when applying for a new role are:

  • Hybrid working (43%)
  • New colleagues (32%)
  • Potential for progression (30 %)
  • Company culture (27%)
  • Equity and bonuses (27%)

Half of office workers (49%) said they would immediately rule out jobs that didn’t offer hybrid working. Sixty-seven percent said it improved work/life balance. A further 37% mentioned improved mental health and wellbeing as a benefit. Reduction in commuting load was another benefit (36%). Thirty-one percent said it enhanced productivity.

IWG also provided data that indicates how the popularity of hybrid working is increasing the demand for suburban and rural office space. Demand for rural and suburban office space increased by 29% in 2021. Locations such as Bromsgrove (+52%), Beaconsfield (+33%), and Tewkesbury (+22%) rose in popularity.

Bruce Daisley, Author of The Joy of Work and former EMEA Vice-President of Twitter, said: “We’re right at the start of the biggest transformation in the way we work that we’ve ever witnessed. The biggest danger for firms is thinking that we’re the end of the change; we’re just at the start and companies need to prepare themselves.”

Mark Dixon, CEO of IWG, commented: “With a buoyant job market after a challenging couple of years, workers are demanding more of their employers and their roles. Gone are the days when salary was the only factor when considering a job offer, and nothing better demonstrates this than the rise of hybrid working.”

“Daily commuting is an expensive and unnecessary practice, and it’s clear to see that workers around the UK are taking back control of this time. Employers who don’t offer hybrid working are going to miss out on the best talent. Not only do employees benefit from a dramatically improved work-life balance, but by switching to a hybrid model, businesses can expect to save an average of more than £8,000 per employee, all while minimising their carbon footprint.”

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Employers told to voluntarily report ethnicity pay  

Ever since the Gender Pay Gap Reporting Regulations were introduced in 2017 the industry has been discussing whether the UK Government would introduce mandatory ethnicity pay reporting requirements for UK employers. Over the years, there have been several calls to action and lobbies for the Government to do so but pleas have fallen on deaf ears as last week, the Government confirmed that “at this stage” it will not be introducing a mandatory requirement for UK employers to report on their ethnicity pay – much to the dismay of many industry bodies, regulators and employers.  

Considering the sharp focus on DE&I post COVID-19, this decision is somewhat disappointing as Laurie Ollivent, Senior Associate, Employment & Incentives and the Diversity Faculty at Linklaters commented: “Whilst the Government hasn’t ruled out introducing mandatory ethnicity pay reporting in the future, it is clear that we should not expect it as a legal requirement in the UK anytime soon. But what the Government has said is that for those employers who choose to voluntarily report on their ethnicity pay gap, they are supportive of the recommendation that employers should publish accompanying action plans and a diagnosis which explains any pay gap and addresses any disparities, and once employers are equipped with a trustworthy, consistent standard for reporting, they should take meaningful action to identify and tackle any causes of disparate pay. In other words – employers need to focus on their narratives. Whilst we accept there are challenges to ethnicity pay reporting beyond those employers face with gender pay reporting which means that the data alone will only ever be a blunt tool to identify potential disparities, the expectation of a narrative without further guidance on what this should look like and the requirement for employers to tackle any causes of disparate pay and report on progress may be off-putting for some businesses considering whether to voluntarily report on their data at this stage and risks halting progress on voluntary reporting rather than encouraging it.  

Simon Kerr-Davis, Counsel, Employment & Incentives and the Diversity Faculty at Linklaters also made comment: “The Women and Equalities Committee report from early 2022 highlighted the increase in employers choosing to voluntarily report on their ethnicity pay gaps. The report states that in 2021, 19% of UK employers voluntarily reported on ethnicity pay – up from 11% in 2018. Whilst this sounds promising and is a large increase, many believe that mandatory reporting obligations are needed – much in the same way as gender pay reporting obligations – for other businesses to follow suit and really drive and achieve change across UK business. 

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Two thirds of women say workplace ‘behind’ with gender equality

[subhed] 63% of women feel unsupported at work

Research by Thoughtworks, a global technology consultancy, has found that around two thirds of women in the UK believe there is still a long way to go when it comes to a range of gender equality issues, from career prospects and personal development to parental support.

The research included a sample of over 1,000 women and asked how they rated the organisation they worked for on a variety of inclusion issues. It found that around two thirds of women believed their organisations were behind the industry when it came to equal pay and equitable opportunity (63%), representation (64%), and career development (64%).

Additionally, a significant proportion of survey women believed their organisation either did not have a plan or didn’t know where to start to address issues of equal pay (30%), representation (26%) or career development (32%).

Less than half of the women surveyed (39%) could point to initiatives put in place by their company to address gender inequality, and only one in seven said their organisation had programmes to mentor women employees, while almost a quarter said their organisations provided inclusion training.

The survey revealed that 63% of women felt there was more work that could be done when it came to supporting working parents, with 29% believing their organisation either did not have a plan to resolve this issue or did not know where to start. Just one in six (18%) said their organisation has an official return to work programme.

More broadly, asking a sample of men, women and underrepresented gender minorities (UGM), the research found the vast majority of organizations (89%) agreed that there were business benefits from championing gender equality issues. Almost a third (29%) could see that it would foster better employee relationships, with the same proportion believing it would increase staff retention.

Amy Lynch, Head of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) at Thoughtworks UK, commented: “International Women’s Day is a key event to shine a spotlight on important areas. There have been some seismic shifts in just a couple of generations, however our results serve as a reminder that the finishing line is still some way off. We have to be candid that some challenges remain, but we can change this with positive action, effective policies and dedication all year round.

“For the tech sector, this is particularly important. There is a wealth of talent out there that does not fit a preconceived ‘mold’ and importantly could offer a sector which relies on innovation and different ways of thinking, a fresh perspective. A culture of inclusion and equity is an essential factor in the quest to attract and retain the best talent. It is the responsibility of leaders within the sector to create paths to give communities that feel technology is not for them the confidence to apply for jobs.”

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19% of women have left a job because of the inability to balance work and caring duties

According to wide-ranging research by Ipsos and Business in the Community (BITC), nearly six out of ten women (58%) say caring responsibilities have stopped them applying for promotion or a new job, and one in five (19%) have left a job because it was too hard to balance work and care.

Whilst 35% of all adults, and 44% per cent of working adults, have caring responsibilities, this research found that they are not spread equally across genders with women accounting for 85% of sole carers for children and 65% of sole carers for older adults. More people from ethnic minority backgrounds (42%) have caring responsibilities than from white backgrounds.

The research was conducted across a sample of 5,444 people in the UK in the hopes of gaining a better understanding of the contemporary attitudes and experiences around combining paid work and care. Although 94% agreed that caring responsibilities should be spread equally, 52% of women who were joint carers say they do more than their fair share with a mere 30% of men admitting they do less.

Only 27% of people believe men and women are treated equally in the workplace with one in five men (20%) saying that caring duties had stopped them from applying for a promotion or a new job, compared to the much higher percentage for women.

The impact of caring responsibilities on workplace progression is greatest on women, who, according to the study, are twice as likely than men to work part-time, and are lower-paid workers and shift workers.

People from black, asian, mixed race or other ethnically diverse groups are disproportionately affected, with the researching revealing that one in two (50%) who have caring responsibilities saying they had been unable to pursue certain jobs or promotions because of this. One in three (32%) have left or considered leaving a job due to a lack of flexibility, compared with around one in five (21%) white people.

Is there a care divide?

According to the research, women make up over half of the lone carers for all groups, including 85% of lone carers for children, 54% of lone carers for working age adults, and 65% of lone carers for older adults. People who care for older adults (68%) are less likely to feel supported than those with childcare responsibilities (78%) or caring for working age adults (77%).

Eight percent of carers identify themselves as ‘sandwich carers’, looking after both children and older adults at the same time with almost half (46%) of current workers having had childcare responsibilities come up ‘during the working day’. Over 50% of women, compared to 42% of men, say their day job has been interrupted because of this. More than one in three women (37%) said other caring responsibilities come up, compared to 31% of men.

Charlotte Woodworth, Gender Equality Campaign Director at BITC, commented: “Employers and policy makers need to understand that caring, for children and others, is a routine part of many people’s lives, and adjust working cultures to better support this. Otherwise, we will continue to see working carers, particularly women and people from black, asian, mixed race and other ethnically diverse backgrounds, pushed down and in some cases out of the workforce.

“Flexibility is key, thinking not just about where work is done, but also when. We need to move past old fashioned ideas about five days a week, 9 – 5, in one location and support everyone to craft a better work life balance, that doesn’t see some people penalised because they can’t work in a certain way.

“But helping women do it all will only get us so far – we must also ensure men are given the opportunity to care. We need to overhaul out-of-date policies that presume only women want to take time out to look after the kids. The government should support employers to offer stand-alone, subsidised paternity leave, in keeping with most people’s beliefs that people of all genders should be supported to care”.

Kelly Beaver, Chief Executive of Ipsos UK, also commented: “A record number of women are in paid work in the UK, and they make up nearly 50% of the workforce, but our research shows that many feel they are held back in their careers by caring responsibilities which are not shared evenly. The majority of those we surveyed believe that more of this responsibility should be shared equally, irrespective of gender, and that employers have a key role in making flexibility at work the rule not the exception.

This research is invaluable in helping employers and policy makers to respond to the increasing demand for a more flexible approach to working and I am proud that at Ipsos we are leading the way, for example all our UK employees are offered equal paid maternity and paternity leave, because we firmly believe that the responsibility of raising a child should not be determined by your gender.”

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A mere 1% of employers report reducing pay gaps

According to results from Mercer’s new UK Gender and Ethnicity Pay Gap trends report75% of respondents disagreed with government’s decision to suspend gender pay gap reporting in 2020. Despite 74% of respondents reporting that their numbers have shown continued commitment for inclusion despite the suspension, there appears to be minimal progress made in closing the gap with half of respondents claiming to see little or no progress made year-on-year. A mere 1% of employers reported reducing their pay gap by more than 10%. The results of the report offer a clear indication of how businesses continue to struggle in closing pay gaps – a trend which is expected to continue. Considering the pandemic has brought DE&I into sharp focus, businesses should allocate more attention to pay gaps in a bid to attract and retain talent in a very challenging market.

Findings in the report revealed that fewer than one in three (30%) employers reduced its gender pay gap by 2% between 2019 and 2020. Granted, focus in 2020 was finding new innovative ways to work with the arrival of the pandemic, but alarmingly, a mere 18% of employers reported an increase in pay gap from 2019 to 2020. Recently reported government figures on the UK gender pay gap numbers suggest a median gap of 10.4% for 2020, compared to 9.7% from 2019. A similar theme to Mercer’s 2021 Gender and Ethnicity Pay Gap Trends survey; and highlighting that focus on pay gaps has dwindled over the last two years.

Michelle Sequeira, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Consulting Leader, Mercer UK commented: “Key drivers of pay gaps range from issues with attracting and retaining women to failing to eliminate the barriers to career progression that prevent female and diverse employees from entering more senior roles. There are employers who have also shown a willingness to change and they are encouraged to conduct deeper analysis to get to the root of the problem and put action plans in place.”

Following many global events surrounding race, it’s believed that employers are now looking beyond gender. Nearly 65% supported legislation enabling ethnicity pay gaps to be addressed and reported with 45% of respondents claiming they felt under pressure to conduct ethnicity pay gap analysis. Even though ethnicity pay gap reporting is not yet a legal requirement in the UK, according to Mercer’s report, 74% of employers have collected data or are planning to do so in future. More than half (57%) are conducting dry-run analysis to calculate ethnicity pay gaps, with 31% reporting that they have published or are planning to publish their pay gaps. Internal stakeholders and employees are adding pressure to organisations to make changes within the organisations and wider society.

Ms Sequeira made final comment: “To truly make a difference, employers must look beyond their pay gaps. In addition to examining ethnicity pay gaps, our report encourages employers to widen the pools from which they recruit and take steps to reduce unconscious bias in processes. Most important of all is creating a genuinely inclusive workforce that allows people to be themselves and thrive both in and outside of work. It is ineffective to offer working parents career development opportunities and salaries if they are expected to extend their working days in ways that negatively impact their family lives. It is futile to hire and train up diverse colleagues if they join a non-inclusive culture or are repeatedly overlooked for promotion. Understanding your current state and engaging and upskilling senior leaders is so key to help them realise where they are going wrong.”

 

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