Tag: disabled workforce

Only 41% of women negotiate salaries for new roles, research reveals

Only 41% of women negotiate their starting salaries for new roles, compared to 61% of men, leaving women at a greater risk of a cost-of-living crisis. This is the finding from new research commissioned by Reed.co.uk.

The study also found that 27% of women are uncomfortable discussing their salary with employers. In comparison, only 13% of men felt the same. Yet, 90% of employees who did negotiate their most recent salary said that they were successful in receiving an increase.

The research among 250 hiring managers and 2,000 job seekers indicated that 51% of people have never negotiated wages for a new job. The ‘ask gap’ is obvious in these statistics, too, with 59% of women saying they had never negotiated salaries when offered new roles, compared to 39% of men.

When it comes down to the money, the most common salary increase in salary was between £1,000-£2,499 (42%). A further 27% received a raise of between £2,500-£4,999. Of these numbers, 42% of men were more likely to secure these pay increases than 31% of women.

The research indicates that salary negotiation is a sought-after skill. Seventy percent of workers agree that salary negotiation should be taught in school. Minority workers particularly value education on the subject, with 74% of women stating that salary negotiation should be taught in school, compared to 65% of men. Similar results were seen with:

  • 78% of LGBTQ+ vs. 70% of straight respondents
  • 83% of BAME vs. 77% of white respondents
  • 82% of disabled vs. 69% of non-disabled respondents

In support of this, 77% of employers look upon candidates positively when the candidates negotiate their salaries during the recruitment process.

When looking at age-related responses, the trends relating to salary discussions seem to be changing. Younger employees are much more open to discussing their salary, with 91% of employees aged 18-34 disclosing their earnings to someone, compared to only 26% of older workers (aged between 55-64).

Between partners, 58% of job seekers share salary details, and 44% share their salary with their families.

Simon Wingate, Managing Director of Reed.co.uk, commented: “The latest Reed.co.uk data sheds new light on how the gender ‘ask gap’ is perpetuating unequal pay. While the government has taken important strides through the pay transparency pilot, the research shows that more needs to be done to address the disparity in confidence between men and women when discussing salary.”

“By introducing salary negotiation skills into school education, future generations across society will be able to understand and implement negotiation strategies during the hiring process – and across other life experiences such as purchasing a house or car. This will enable them to secure a higher starting salary and help close existing pay gaps.”

“At a time when the cost-of-living is rising, the study also shows the value in employees pushing their future employers for a salary increase when being offered a new role and confirms that finding a new job is one of the best possible ways to secure a pay rise. Reed.co.uk has a wealth of career advice on the subject of salaries to help people get paid what they’re worth.”

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More disabled people than non-disabled people research pay gaps before applying for jobs
According to the ONS’s disability pay gap report, the pay gap has widened since the 2014’s number of 11.7%. In 2019, the pay gap was 14.1% and shrunk slightly in 2021 to 13.8%.

UK careers site, Reed.co.uk’s research has also found that 66% of disabled people research gender pay gaps, whereas only 21% non-disabled people did the research. This is an indicator of how important pay parity is for minority groups. The study also revealed that one-in-ten surveyed respondents don’t think that any pay gaps exist in the UK.

Simon Wingate, Managing Director of Reed.co.uk, commented: “It is disappointing to see that the disability pay gap has widened since 2014. This widening discrepancy between disabled and non-disabled workers is especially concerning given that the rising cost-of-living crisis is putting pressure on people across all of society.”

“It’s also concerning for employers facing challenges of their own in terms of recruitment amid widespread labour shortages. Tackling the disability pay gap will be crucial to widening the talent pool, as our own research highlights how important pay parity is to minority groups. Two-thirds (66%) of disabled people state they research a company’s gender pay gap before applying for a job, compared to 21% of people without a disability. This sentiment, in conjunction with the newly released ONS report, demonstrates the attention and work that still needs to be implemented to ensure employers close their disability pay gap.”

“As a Disability Confident employer, Reed.co.uk recognises how important it is to support employees who disclose that they have a disability and will always seek to make reasonable adjustments for prospective candidates. Every individual’s needs will inevitably vary, and it’s important that employers understand this and make appropriate adjustments to support suitable candidates who have applied for a job with them. A fundamental way to attract prospective disabled workers is by being clear in job adverts that the organisation is an inclusive employer who values diversity and is willing to make reasonable adjustments to support candidates through the recruitment process and beyond. It is also helpful to be fully transparent about pay, flexibility, and benefits on job adverts as this will help employers attract a more diverse range of applicants to their role, and ultimately their business.”

As previously reported in TALiNT International, flexible working could create jobs for more than a million disabled candidates. Employers should be creating equal opportunities for every candidate in the workplace and not only promote equal pay, but also offer flexibility as a matter of course.

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