Tag: Job Seekers

46% of applicants put off by bad online reviews

A recent survey by recruitment and employment technology company, CareerWallet has revealed detailed trends and insights into the UK job market. The report has shown the top seven reasons job seekers are put off a business when applying for a new role, with bad reviews and terrible annual leave topping the list.

Top reasons job seekers are put off applying for new roles

  • Bad reviews online 46%
  • Poor annual leave 44%
  • Bad staff incentives and benefits 42%
  • Morally dubious sector 32%
  • No hybrid working 21%
  • No sustainability policy 19%
  • Outdated sector 18%

The survey showed that job seekers extensively research firms before applying for new roles with nearly half (46%) put off by bad reviews online and 19% refusing to apply to firms with no sustainability policy. Terrible annual leave (44%) and bad staff incentives/ benefits (42%) were also high on the list of reasons job seekers would be put off applying to new potential employers when looking for a career change.

The national survey also revealed what is important for job seekers when applying for new roles and gives employers a good idea of what to consider in order to attract the best talent. For example, upgrading staff benefits, offering some level of hybrid working and also making sure annual leave is competitive and in line with competitors makes a job role more attractive to potential applicants.

Craig Bines, CEO at The CareerWallet Group made commented: “At CareerWallet we process millions of jobs a day and this allows us to quickly see how the job market is being impacted on a daily basis.

Our national employee survey has highlighted how UK jobseekers are extensively researching their next potential employer with 1 in 5 even checking for sustainability policies. Many businesses may need to consider changing outdated company policies around annual leave and hybrid working, making sure they remain competitive and can attract the very best talent.”

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CPI remains static

Although the previous week’s level was revised downward by 12,000, jobless claims increased by 14,000 last week. With this increase, the jobless claims level is now 262,000, according to the latest US Department of Labor reports.

According to a Reuters poll, economists forecast 263,000 applications for the latest week.

Other stats show that the four-week moving average of claims increased by 4,500 in the week ended Aug. 6 to 252,000. The previous week’s average, however, was revised downward by 7,250.

In related news, The US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the consumer price index for urban consumers was unchanged in July compared to the previous month. However, year on year, the index increased by 8.5% in July, this number down from 9.1% in June.

While the cooling of headline inflation is welcome at the Federal Reserve, economists warn that the Fed wants to see more months like this and that officials are also focusing on core prices, according to Market Watch.

Sal Guatieri, Senior Economist at BMO Capital Markets, commented: “The July CPI report might be the first clear indication that consumers are pushing back against high inflation in response to tighter monetary policy. It’s a sign that inflation is close to peaking, though the climb down the mountain will be slow due to rising wages and rents.”

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Half of workers dismiss jobs that do not offer hybrid working

According to new research by IWG, hybrid working is now the most sought-after benefit for job seekers. The research showed large numbers of office workers out flexible working alongside other benefits such as health insurance and group income protection (88%), life insurance (84%), unlimited vacation (76%), and extended parental leave (71%) as important benefits in a new role.

The survey was conducted among 2,000 office workers to understand better the key factors driving jobseekers’ decision-making.

The jobs website Indeed revealed that ‘hybrid’ is one of the fastest-growing search terms, having increased by 6,531% in the last 12 months. In addition, according to IWG’s research, half of workers would immediately dismiss jobs that do not offer hybrid working.

Job seekers also highly value the opportunity to work remotely. Searches for remote work have also risen by 666% and now account for 2.3% of all searches. Sixty percent of respondents stated they would like to work within 15 minutes of their home.

According to the research, office workers’ top five considerations when applying for a new role are:

  • Hybrid working (43%)
  • New colleagues (32%)
  • Potential for progression (30 %)
  • Company culture (27%)
  • Equity and bonuses (27%)

Half of office workers (49%) said they would immediately rule out jobs that didn’t offer hybrid working. Sixty-seven percent said it improved work/life balance. A further 37% mentioned improved mental health and wellbeing as a benefit. Reduction in commuting load was another benefit (36%). Thirty-one percent said it enhanced productivity.

IWG also provided data that indicates how the popularity of hybrid working is increasing the demand for suburban and rural office space. Demand for rural and suburban office space increased by 29% in 2021. Locations such as Bromsgrove (+52%), Beaconsfield (+33%), and Tewkesbury (+22%) rose in popularity.

Bruce Daisley, Author of The Joy of Work and former EMEA Vice-President of Twitter, said: “We’re right at the start of the biggest transformation in the way we work that we’ve ever witnessed. The biggest danger for firms is thinking that we’re the end of the change; we’re just at the start and companies need to prepare themselves.”

Mark Dixon, CEO of IWG, commented: “With a buoyant job market after a challenging couple of years, workers are demanding more of their employers and their roles. Gone are the days when salary was the only factor when considering a job offer, and nothing better demonstrates this than the rise of hybrid working.”

“Daily commuting is an expensive and unnecessary practice, and it’s clear to see that workers around the UK are taking back control of this time. Employers who don’t offer hybrid working are going to miss out on the best talent. Not only do employees benefit from a dramatically improved work-life balance, but by switching to a hybrid model, businesses can expect to save an average of more than £8,000 per employee, all while minimising their carbon footprint.”

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Twice as many job seekers in the city compared to same time last year

According to job seeker data from job aggregator, ClickJobs.io, 35.4% of all job seekers in the last month were applying for roles in the capital, putting London in the lead for job applications in the UK.

Year on year, these figures show a huge spike. During the same period last year, 19.7% of applications were for jobs in London. The next city on the list, Birmingham, only accounted for 3.7% of applications. Manchester and Leeds followed at only 2%.

The spike comes as no surprise as offices reopen post-pandemic and people begin to return to the city. While this is good news for London-based businesses, it could negatively impact hiring employers in other cities and regions.

Joe Boll, CEO at ClickJobs.io, commented: “At CilckJobs.io we believe it is essential to understand how job seekers are applying for the latest jobs across our portfolio of websites to ensure we can offer the very best solution to mirror these trends. This new data shows a huge increase in demand for jobs in London which is good news for the capital but could impact other regions looking to attract talent.

We manage millions of jobs every week which means we can quickly see how the market is changing and what key trends are happening across employment in the UK.”

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Only 41% of women negotiate salaries for new roles, research reveals

Only 41% of women negotiate their starting salaries for new roles, compared to 61% of men, leaving women at a greater risk of a cost-of-living crisis. This is the finding from new research commissioned by Reed.co.uk.

The study also found that 27% of women are uncomfortable discussing their salary with employers. In comparison, only 13% of men felt the same. Yet, 90% of employees who did negotiate their most recent salary said that they were successful in receiving an increase.

The research among 250 hiring managers and 2,000 job seekers indicated that 51% of people have never negotiated wages for a new job. The ‘ask gap’ is obvious in these statistics, too, with 59% of women saying they had never negotiated salaries when offered new roles, compared to 39% of men.

When it comes down to the money, the most common salary increase in salary was between £1,000-£2,499 (42%). A further 27% received a raise of between £2,500-£4,999. Of these numbers, 42% of men were more likely to secure these pay increases than 31% of women.

The research indicates that salary negotiation is a sought-after skill. Seventy percent of workers agree that salary negotiation should be taught in school. Minority workers particularly value education on the subject, with 74% of women stating that salary negotiation should be taught in school, compared to 65% of men. Similar results were seen with:

  • 78% of LGBTQ+ vs. 70% of straight respondents
  • 83% of BAME vs. 77% of white respondents
  • 82% of disabled vs. 69% of non-disabled respondents

In support of this, 77% of employers look upon candidates positively when the candidates negotiate their salaries during the recruitment process.

When looking at age-related responses, the trends relating to salary discussions seem to be changing. Younger employees are much more open to discussing their salary, with 91% of employees aged 18-34 disclosing their earnings to someone, compared to only 26% of older workers (aged between 55-64).

Between partners, 58% of job seekers share salary details, and 44% share their salary with their families.

Simon Wingate, Managing Director of Reed.co.uk, commented: “The latest Reed.co.uk data sheds new light on how the gender ‘ask gap’ is perpetuating unequal pay. While the government has taken important strides through the pay transparency pilot, the research shows that more needs to be done to address the disparity in confidence between men and women when discussing salary.”

“By introducing salary negotiation skills into school education, future generations across society will be able to understand and implement negotiation strategies during the hiring process – and across other life experiences such as purchasing a house or car. This will enable them to secure a higher starting salary and help close existing pay gaps.”

“At a time when the cost-of-living is rising, the study also shows the value in employees pushing their future employers for a salary increase when being offered a new role and confirms that finding a new job is one of the best possible ways to secure a pay rise. Reed.co.uk has a wealth of career advice on the subject of salaries to help people get paid what they’re worth.”

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A positive candidate experience is likely to result in job offer acceptance

Job vacancies across the UK have reached a record high of 1.03million. When considering the war for talent and according to screening and identity services firm, Sterling, employers must streamline onboarding processes or risk losing candidates to the competition.

Research has found that 60% of job seekers abandon the application process if it takes too long or is too complex with a separate study suggesting that a positive candidate experience makes a candidate 38% more likely to accept a job offer from a company.

Steve Smith, Managing Director, Sterling EMEA commented: “There is no doubt that acute skills shortages across the UK are driving the need for efficient onboarding processes. With rising vacancy numbers and competition for talent intensifying, employers must quite simply streamline background screening processes or risk losing candidates in the process.

“With UK employment now at pre-pandemic levels employers across almost every sector are crying out for skills – and in this jobseeker-driven market, candidate experience can become your competitive advantage.”

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