Tag: learning and development

87% of organisations are currently using coaching

Digital coaching platform, CoachHub has presented the findings of its 2023 Business Trends in Coaching survey, and it has identified coaching has become an integral part of learning and development for the modern organisation.

Coaching is among the top three tools in which companies are investing their learning and development budget at present. Business buyers surveyed stated that they see employee wellbeing as the top use case for coaching, followed closely by leadership development.

Professor Jonathan Passmore, Senior Vice President (Coaching) at CoachHub said: “For generations, coaches and clients have been experiencing the breadth of benefits that coaching brings, and it is truly wonderful to see that this is increasingly being heard at an organisational level.”

Alongside an increase in coaching spend is an increase in openness to the application of new technologies within people development, with almost two thirds (61%) of respondents stating that they believe in the potential of virtual reality in the sector.

Other key findings include:

  • 87% of organisations are currently using coaching
  • 44% of respondents say that coaching supports professional development, increasing performance, or learning new skills
  • 85% predicted that there would be growth in the demand for managers developing coaching skills in their organisation.

Passmore continued: “The evidence shows that the learning and development industry is fast embracing the benefits of virtual delivery. There is a clear demand for a coaching model which responds to the needs of the user at a time and a place that suits them,” continued Passmore. “It has never been a better time to democratise access to coaching, ensuring that coaching is for everyone, regardless of seniority or job title.”

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LinkedIn’s vision is to create a skills-first approach to hiring and learning

LinkedIn announced that it acquired EduBrite, a Fremont, California-based SaaS learning platform focused on creating, hosting and deploying professional certificates.

Several members of the EduBrite team, including CEO Ajay Upadhyaya and co-founder Manish Gupta, will join LinkedIn when the transaction closes.

According to LinkedIn, the acquisition will enable it to integrate EduBrite’s certification assessment engine into its learning platform, making it simpler for the company to test and verify the skills people claim to possess.

The deal aims to help LinkedIn further deliver on its vision to create a skills-first approach to hiring and learning.

EduBrite was founded in 2009.

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The programme provides a full-time curriculum to train participants in a bid to stave off skills gaps 

SAP SE announced the launch of its Partner Talent Initiative. The initiative aims to identify and train new and existing talent in the SAP Partner Ecosystem in order to support increasing demand within the IT channel for skilled certified professionals.

Participants who complete the programme will graduate with three SAP certifications before re-entering the partner ecosystem as graduates who are ready for employment. The programme provides full-time curriculum designed to certify IT professionals in crucial and high demand areas including  RISE with SAP S/4HANA Cloud as well as an introduction to SAP S/4HANA Financial Accounting.

Two cohorts have already started the programme and following successful completion, graduates will begin a three-month intensive training program that will equip them with the professional and personal skills needed to become an SAP consultant.

SAP’s partners are in demand as the SAP EMEA North cloud services market is growing at CAGR of 16% which has resulted in a digital skills gap. The new programme is open to both recent graduates and those working in complimentary industries and will help address existing gaps in talent by equipping graduates with the skills and qualifications that they need to find employment in the partner community.

Participants will receive ongoing support and continuous feedback from delegates, instructors and the wider partner team throughout the training period and will also have an executive welcome and kick-off event upon joining. Participants will be given the option of attending a physical graduation ceremony upon completion.

SAP also announced that a business development fund (BDF) incentive to partners who recruit, train and certify new consultants under the Drive2Deliver partner capacity initiative.

The Partner Talent Initiative also includes:

  • Access to enablement content for members of SAP partner ecosystem
  • First-hand practice on live SAP software training systems
  • Expert-led and peer-to-peer learning environments
  • Opportunities to obtain SAP Global Certification digital badges and stay current with ongoing technology advances

Celine Cazali, chief partner officer, SAP UK & Ireland, made comment: “By launching the Partner Talent Initiative, graduates of the program will learn invaluable skills, helping customers and partners successfully become Intelligent Enterprises and provide high-quality services. Through a rigorous curriculum, combined with continuous feedback and support, our programme will equip the next generation of consultants with the mindset, skills and ambition needed to succeed in the channel and beyond.”

Paul Cooper, chairman, UK & Ireland SAP User Group (UKISUG), also commented: “We welcome the creation of the Partner Talent Initiative as it will help address a potential skills gap in the future. Our most recent member research highlighted that many organisations are concerned a lack of available skills will impact the speed their organisation moves to SAP S/4HANA. A thriving partner ecosystem with more certified talent will be essential in supporting customers’ SAP S/4HANA journeys and developing the next-generation workforce.”

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Lack of salary increases and growth opportunities identified as top issues

Two new reports published by 360Learning have indicated that the Learning and Development sector has some challenges to deal with. The reports revealed that 42% of UK L&D professionals had not received a pay rise in recent months, and a further 23% believe they do not have opportunities to develop at work.

The reports, which look at salaries, progression, and satisfaction in corporate Learning and Development (L&D) teams across the US and UK, have the following findings:

In the UK:

  • The most common annual salary range was found to be between £30-£39k a year
  • The average salary comes in at £31.6k
  • People working in voluntary sectors were likely to earn less than £39k
  • People in the private sector had the best chance of earning more than £80k
  • 25% of L&D Managers earned between £50-£59k
  • Administrators in the L&D environment earned the least at below £39k

In the US:

  • The most common salary range was $70-$100k
  • The mean salary across all roles was much higher than the UK average, at $91.2k
  • 41% of L&D Managers earned more than $100k
  • Instructional Designers and Learning Specialists in the L&D environment earned the least, at less than $70k

The gender pay gap is also clear in the results with:

  • One-third of UK women earn less than the national average (£31,285) compared to only a fifth of men
  • Half of the women in the UK earned less than £39k, compared to only 36% of men
  • Only a quarter of women said they earn more than £40k, versus 41% of men in similar roles

When looking at reasons for lack of advancement, in the UK, 6% of women report that childcare and family are stopping them from growing at work, compared to just 1% of men.

In the US, 4% of people cite personal or family reasons for preventing advancement.

The studies also looked at salary satisfaction. Interestingly, despite gender and role disparities, 53% of L&D professionals in the UK and US were satisfied with their salaries, with the satisfaction increasing per age bracket.

In the UK:

  • 56% of men and 55% of women were satisfied with their earnings
  • 58% of men and 59% of women between 25 and 45 were also happy with their incomes.
  • 42% of UK professionals haven’t had a pay rise in more than 12 months
  • Of the professionals who had not had a pay rise, 54% admitted that they’re not comfortable asking for one
  • Among the professionals who did receive pay rises, 52% were below the rate of inflation, with 45% as low as 1%-3% – half the rate of inflation

In the US:

  • 80% of professionals have had a raise in the past two years
  • 20% have had no raise at all or last had a raise three or more years ago
  • If they have had a pay rise, 38% saw a 1-3% increase
  • 10% of professionals had enjoyed a salary increase of 10% or more over the past 12 months. 41% were “comfortable” or “very comfortable” about asking for pay rises

As far as the impact of education and career experience on salary is concerned, the survey found that 74% of higher salaries across the UK went to people aged over 45; however, 73% of the over 45s surveyed had been in the L&D industry for less than a year.

It would appear that qualifications do not have much influence on compensation. Most of the UK respondents don’t have an L&D-related degree. Of the respondents who earned more than £70k a year – only 7% had degrees or higher. However, in the highest salary bracket, only 2% of people without an L&D-related degree earn more than £80,000 compared to 6% of respondents who do. Clearly,  L&D degrees can lead to higher salaries when it comes to senior roles.

In the US, where wages were higher than $70k, there were almost equal numbers of people with L&D degrees and those without, indicating that on-the-job training via mentors, upskilling, and learning management systems can be an effective route to progression.

The survey provided insights into the roles of mentors in earning potential. For example, the respondents who had a salary of more than $100k a year were more likely to have mentors than those earning lower salaries. Similarly, professionals with a 4% or higher salary increase in the previous 12 months were also likely to have had a mentor.

Generally speaking, mentorship numbers are higher in the US than in the UK. Of the US respondents, 65% of professionals agreed that they benefitted from mentoring, while only 47% in the UK said the same. These numbers could correlate with the fact that 20% of male and 21% of female L&D professionals in the UK feel that they lack opportunities to progress in their careers.

With 4% of US respondents and 22% of UK respondents saying they want to leave L&D, it is essential that L&D professionals feel empowered to effectively provide training and support to other employees.

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Verbal communication and teamwork also top of list

A new study on skills in the workplace, commissioned by LMS provider Digits, has revealed the most important skills that workers expect from their managers. Of the 2,048 working-age adults polled, 51% of men and 45% of women agreed that leadership skills were the most important skills for managers.

Next on the list was verbal communication and teamwork, at 35%, followed by empathy at 30% and problem-solving at 29%. Written communication was at the bottom of the list at only 8%.

Just 10% of the respondents did not have any specific skill requirements for a manager.

Ranked by popularity, the most important skills needed by managers are:

  • Leadership skills (48%)
  • Verbal communication skills (35%)
  • Teamwork skills (35%)
  • Empathy (30%)
  • Problem-solving skills (29%)
  • A strong work ethic (21%)
  • Good time management (18%)
  • Conflict resolution (15%)
  • Written communication skills (8%)

Leadership skills include a variety of skills, hard and soft, and the term can mean different things to different people.

Bradley Burgoyne, Head of Talent at Digits, believes that the core leadership skills of a manager include:

  • Vision setting
  • Empathy and listening
  • Inclusive leadership
  • Coaching skills
  • Self-awareness
  • Collaboration skills

When analysed by age, the survey results revealed that opinions on managerial attributes differed depending on where people were in their careers, with 56% of people over 55 believing that leadership skills were the most important, compared to only 28% of 16 to 24-year-olds.

Other important attributes across the age groups were:

  • A strong work ethic is important to 25% of 16 to 24 year-olds
  • Verbal communication skills are preferred by 36% of 24 to 34 year-olds and 44% of over-55s
  • Teamwork skills are very important to 36% of those aged 35 to 54 years old

Burgoyne commented: “We’ve got more generations in the workforce today than we’ve ever had. And, each group of workers prefers slightly different managerial styles and leadership qualities.

“Every individual has their own expectations about how they want their managers to lead them, coach them, support them, relate to them, and empower them. Those skills don’t just happen, even the best managers need to receive regular training and development from their employers.”

“The challenge for HR and L&D teams is to ensure that their training strategy is broad enough to cater to all levels of employees in the organisation because, I think, everyone benefits from leadership or management development.

“It’s important that employers actively listen to their workforce and find out where the skills gaps are – what training do employees think they need? What training do employees think their managers need and what leadership qualities do they respond best to? They can then utilise the data to create training courses or a series of engaging development activities in their learning management system, that are really relevant to the people within the organisation rather than something that could, potentially, be seen as just a tick-box exercise.”

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“Trinnovo Group is purpose-led with a mission to build diversity, create inclusion, and encourage workplace innovation.” – Richard MacMillan, Chairperson, Trinnovo Group

In April, Trinnovo Group made two announcements: the appointment of Richard MacMillan to the Board of Directors as Chairperson as well as the launch of its fourth brand Equiris Consulting.

NEW CHAIRPERSON
Richard has a 25-year history in the staffing industry was CEO of health and life science staffing and services company called Independent Clinical Services (ICS) for 14 years. He led the growth and diversification of ICS through three periods of Private Equity ownership until it sold in September 2020. During his tenure, ICS completed multiple acquisitions, expanded its international presence, and developed several innovative healthcare services.

Richard commented: “Trinnovo Group is an exciting and dynamic business led by exceptionally talented people and I am delighted to join as Chairperson. Trinnovo Group is purpose-led with a mission to build diversity, create inclusion, and encourage workplace innovation. They have a unique and exciting approach to the full talent cycle. The business is flourishing, and I look forward to working with the team as they continue to diversify the business and grow internationally.”

James Cox, Trinnovo Group CEO also commented: “I am delighted to have Richard join us as Chairperson. Richard’s track record in international growth driven by an entrepreneurial and technology focused approach is second to none. The Board and I are hugely excited to work with Richard and to continue disrupting the recruitment sector via our people and delivering our vision, to be the fastest organically growing and most impactful recruitment business on the planet. Ashley Lawrence continues to support the group working with the Trinnovo Board in his new role as Founder.”

NEW BRAND
The announcement of the new brand, Equiris Consulting will enable high-growth businesses to attract, retain and develop amazing people and high-performing teams that are representative of society by ensuring that the world of work is a more inclusive and equitable place for everyone.

Equiris is a talent consultancy and solutions provider with a diversity, equity, and inclusion methodology that is focused on the full talent lifecycle including attraction, assessment, onboarding, learning and development and retention.

TIARA Recruitment Award winners 2021, Trinnovo understands that every business is unique, and focus on building strong relationships that enable them to truly understand their clients’ business strategies. This focus enables them to embed bespoke talent solutions into clients’ businesses that help them achieve sustainable growth while ensuring that diversity, equity, and inclusion are at the forefront of their strategic agenda. It works closely with its sister brands, specialist recruitment companies Trust in Soda, Broadgate and BioTalent, to offer a full wrap-around DEI focused talent solution.

Cara Myers, Talent Advisory Director at Equiris Consulting commented: “I am so incredibly excited to be launching Equiris Consulting. Across our social enterprise and unique platforms, we have inspired a lot of change within the workplace and worked hard to make it a place that is more inclusive for everyone. We recognised, however, that we have an opportunity to do more, and to not only inspire change but to also work with our clients and partners to offer very targeted DEI focused talent solutions that enable high-growth companies to scale in a way that is diverse, equitable and inclusive.”

James Cox, Trinnovo Group CEO also commented: “The Board and I are hugely excited to launch Equiris Consulting. We created Equiris Consulting because we want to provide solutions that enable high-growth, tech-enabled businesses to grow in diverse and sustainable way. We are on a mission to build diversity, create inclusion, and encourage workplace innovation, and we are excited to see the impact that will be delivered through our new talent consultancy and solutions provider.”

 

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Watching videos is most popular learning method

According to new research commissioned by Digits, a learning management systems provider, more than one in four people say that they prefer learning through videos and internet-based courses. However, less than one in four of the 2,000 people polled favour face to face options. Only one in six people prefer listening to online or in-app content.

When given the option between in-person one-to-one tutoring and online tutoring, the latter was the least popular, with only one in eight respondents preferring this method.

The results also showed differences between male and female learning preferences.

  • 31% of men prefer watching online videos compared to 27% of women
  • 31% of women would opt for online courses compared to 26% of men.

Further distinctions were found between the various generations:

  • 43% of respondents over the age of 55 have no particular preference for learning methods compared to only 14% of respondents aged 16-to-34-years-old.
  • 29% of generation X-ers, aged 45 to 54, say they have no particular preference for learning methods.
  • 24% of people over 55 who did show a particular preference are more likely to try online courses than online videos (21%).
  • Video content was preferable to everyone under 55.
  • 25% of the 16-24-year-old age group prefer in-person learning to online courses – this could be attributed to pandemic-related disruption, where many learners missed in-person learning.

The study also researched the courses and topics that people have been searching for in recent years. The five most sought-after online courses, based on monthly search volumes, were:

  • Microsoft
  • Angular
  • Microsoft Excel
  • Data analytics
  • JavaScript

Bradley Burgoyne, head of talent at Digits, says: “I don’t think you can underestimate the effects of the pandemic and the seismic shift that it’s had on society as a whole. We’ve proven that we can do so much more virtually and remotely than we could ever have thought possible just a few years ago. It has changed how we interact with each other on many levels, and, as a knock-on effect, how we want to interact and experience learning and development – both professionally and personally.

“I think people really enjoy the flexibility that online learning brings – being able to learn at a time of their choosing, when they are ready to learn, for the length of time that they want to devote to it. As these survey results clearly show, people prefer learning methods that are less prescriptive and give them more personal choice in when and how they learn. I think it’d be really difficult for some people to imagine going back to how certain things were pre-2020. And why would they? Face-to-face learning, taking place at a set location and point in time, isn’t always as easy to fit in around the rest of people’s busy lives as online learning is.

“Of course, there is and will always be a demand for face-to-face learning. And that’s the challenge for HR and L&D teams – and anyone that offers training – as we move forward. When we’re designing a piece of learning or a development activity, it has to work on many levels: it has to be able to cater for different audiences, with different learning needs and preferences, who will all want to interact with it in a slightly different way.”

After more than two years of being forced to stay home, it is clear that eLearning has never been more popular, and most people enjoy the choice and control over how and when they learn.

 

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