Tag: learning and development

42% of intermediate and junior staff struggle with “boring and unengaging” training

In the face of skills gaps and fierce competition for enhanced services and products, CYPHER Learning, a modern learning platform provider, has conducted research shedding light on the disparity between employers and employees regarding workplace development.

The study’s key findings expose a significant contrast in training opportunities. It reveals that a staggering 88% of business owners and C-level executives enjoy the freedom to choose when, where, and how they undergo training. In stark contrast, only 37% of entry-level employees have the same privilege. Additionally, 42% of owners and C-suite executives who received training in the past year reported having more training compared to the previous year, while just 17% of intermediate or entry-level workers experienced a similar increase.

Moreover, business owners and C-level executives are nearly three times more likely to describe their training as “enjoyable” and at least twice as likely to find it “inspiring” compared to junior employees. Conversely, 42% of intermediate and junior staff struggle with “boring and unengaging” training, with over a third (36%) agreeing that workplace learning and development (L&D) has become synonymous with “death by PowerPoint.”

Graham Glass, CEO of CYPHER Learning, commented: “When someone is starting out their career, that’s usually when they’re most in need of training. Too often, they don’t get it, which can hinder teams and individuals from reaching their full potential. For higher performance, businesses can reset the balance by delivering quality, ‘executive-style’ training to staff at all levels.”

Recognized as a crucial factor in achieving business growth, employee satisfaction, and successful recruitment, learning and development (L&D) holds immense importance. Analyzing the survey responses of 4,000 general workers in US and UK companies with over 500 employees, the survey findings indicate that 98% of all workers consider training important for their roles, with 64% acknowledging that professional development has provided them with a competitive edge. Furthermore, 76% of employees are more likely to remain with employers who prioritize training, as 71% believe that a lack of investment in training reflects a lack of concern for employees. Despite these positive attitudes towards training, a concerning portion of the workforce has not received any training in the past year, with 17% reporting no training.

Among those who have undergone training, a portion has failed to perceive its benefits, including 5% who believe they received no benefit, 31% who feel unprepared for future skills challenges, and 34% who forgot their training within a month of completing it. Notably, 26% of respondents view current training programs as wasteful, offering no business value.

Glass, continued: “Employees clearly place high value on training, which is why it can help to attract top talent. In fact, employees rank training as high a priority as healthcare. But not all training programs are created equal! A system that delivers forgettable, generalised content, or doesn’t keep workers competitive, is less valuable to them and the organisation alike.

It’s crucial that businesses modernise their development programs. But that’s harder with outdated infrastructure, content, and resources. Greater personalisation at scale takes a more agile platform – something that supports competency-based skills development one employee at a time. Such a platform can foster a culture of habitual reskilling that unlocks more potential organisation-wide and keeps the innovation engine purring.”

The research features within CYPHER’s The State of Corporate Learning and Development in 2023: Stuck in the Middle report, which can be downloaded https://www.cypherlearning.com/the-state-of-corporate-learning-and-developement-2023.

Share this article on social media

Lack of resources and leadership support stifles upskilling efforts

According to new research from O’Reilly, the demand for digitally skilled workers in UK vertical industries, including technology, finance, e-commerce, and retail, is outgrowing the level of digital skills available.

Despite this, only 51% of British companies within these industries are willing to spend more than £25,000 on recruitment and learning and development to boost skills such as cybersecurity, software architecture, and data analysis.

Three hundred HR decision-makers within the technology, finance, e-commerce, and retail industries were surveyed to find out which digital skills are most in demand. The research, conducted by Censuswide in September 2022, also looked at the potential barriers to upskilling staff.

The research found that 27% of the HR decision-makers believe their organisation faces the biggest lack of skilled workers in cybersecurity, followed by software architecture at 15%, and data analysis at 14%.

Yet, only 33% are willing to spend more than £10,000 on recruitment and L&D to hire cybersecurity talent. Seventy-one percent of organisations will spend no more than £10,000 on recruitment and L&D for data analysis, and 68% said the same about software architecture skills.

On the other hand, 32% of organisations are planning to spend £20,000 or more on recruitment for AI and ML and 31% on cloud. More than a quarter of organisations will spend up to or more than £20,000 on AI and ML (29%) and cloud (28%) L&D to upskill employees.

The research also found that over the next 12 months, organisations will spend an average of:

  • £13,962 on L&D for Gen Z
  • £13,608 for Millennials
  • £13,495 for Gen X

The majority (83%) of vertical industries plan to spend between £25,000 – £50,000 on overall recruitment for skilled tech vacancies over the next twelve months; however, only 78% will spend the same amount on tech-related L&D.

Looking at each sector, the research revealed that:

  • The technology sector is planning to spend an average of £33,676 on recruitment and £31,651 on L&D.
  • The finance sector will spend an average of £33,075 on recruitment and £31,400 on L&D.
  • The retail and e-commerce sector will spend an average of £29,275 on recruitment and £28,801 on L&D.

The research found that the biggest barriers to upskilling current employees are : Insufficient resources (21%); lack of internal personnel (19%); lack of internal buy-in (17%).

In the tech sector, 21% of organisations agreed that lack of leadership support is a key barrier to upskilling current employees. Conversely, across all industries combined, 58% of HR decision-makers said that they are ‘significantly’ supported by leadership when it comes to investment in tech-related L&D.

Alexia Pedersen, VP of EMEA at O’Reilly, commented: “It’s encouraging that 80% of companies within the UK’s tech, finance and retail sectors have increased investment for tech-related learning and development over the past three years. However, our data suggests that further investment is needed to recession-proof the UK’s vertical industries.”

“With the pound currently at a 37-year low against the dollar, now is the time for companies to deploy upskilling programmes alongside ongoing recruitment efforts. Likewise, employees should prioritise L&D to safeguard their role and make themselves an invaluable asset to their organisation. This will be key to creating a highly skilled workforce that keeps British businesses at the forefront of their industries globally.”

Share this article on social media

50% of organisations considering practical training for financial planning in cost-of-living crisis

Research* from DeltaNet International has shown that learning and development professionals believe mental health and wellbeing is the most important eLearning topic for the next 12 months.

In a close second came stress management training for employees, with nearly nine in 10 (88%) employers saying they are worried about how the cost-of-living crisis is affecting employees.  

These areas are ranked as more important than diversity and inclusion, cybersecurity, health and safety, and sustainability training.  

Half of those surveyed (50%) revealed that their learning and development budgets would not change despite the current economic climate putting increased pressure on businesses to support employees further with one in five (21%) stating that a reduction in their budget would be one of the biggest challenges affecting learning and development in the workplace. 

Regarding specific training to help employees navigate the cost of living, almost two-thirds (65%) said this isn’t something they have yet given. But half (50%) are considering implementing practical training such as financial planning.  

The results also revealed an underinvestment in training line managers. Just 27% of L&D professionals said they plan to provide line managers with training linked to the rising cost of living, such as helping managers to spot the signs of those in their teams who may be struggling. 

Chris Chappell, Head of Content at DeltaNet International, said: “Given the current economic situation we find ourselves in, it’s unsurprising that mental health support and stress management are topping the agenda for learning and development priorities.  

“Businesses must support colleagues as best as possible to maintain a contented and productive workforce, but many still have not acted. Whilst good rates of pay and benefits schemes are key to helping people through the cost-of-living crisis, there is much more we can do to support employees, and training plays a key role in this.” 

Employee engagement with L&D also remains a big challenge. 27% of those surveyed revealed this is currently their primary obstacle. Most HR and training professionals are trying to overcome this by asking employees for written feedback on training, with 77% conducting post-training evaluation – only 12% request verbal feedback. 

 

Share this article on social media

83% of workers want companies to reimagine corporate learning

According to new research from Executive Networks and NovoEd, the days of learning leaders presenting to an in-person group in a conference room are not over, but eight out of ten learning leaders (83%) reported that the burgeoning hybrid workforce is pushing companies to reimagine corporate learning to meet new ways of work. Nearly six in ten (59%) of the 515 learning leaders at large corporations who participated in the survey believe that hybrid learning is becoming a major part of the learning landscape, not just a temporary trend.

Christina Yu, CMO at NovoEd commented: “Learning leaders are preparing for profound changes as they redesign corporate learning with new delivery methods and rethink how to meet the needs of new audiences. The pivot to online learning and the availability of a greater range of technology and tools that can be integrated into learning initiatives, such as social and collaborative learning platforms, make it easier for real-time interaction between cohorts, experts, and mentors.

In addition, corporate learning organizations are shifting away from focusing on full-time employees with long tenures. Currently, nine in ten organizations (89%) are targeting learning to full-time internal employees. Yet just six in ten (62%) will focus learning opportunities on full-time employees in 2025. Notably, the learning and development audience will expand to include customers, external stakeholders, contractors, gig workers, freelancers, service providers, and workers’ dependents. The biggest jump in training offerings for new audiences will be digital automation workers, which will rise 23% in 2025.

Jeanne Meister, Executive Vice President at Executive Networks said: “The expectation that online and hybrid learning would be a temporary fix during the pandemic changed as hybrid and remote work became a permanent part of the business landscape. The corporate university is no longer a physical space. Learning and development needs to happen where work takes place and learning leaders must place a greater focus on creating blended learning experiences that mirror hybrid work models.”

With in-person corporate learning on the decline and corporate universities transforming into corporate academies, business leaders are re-evaluating how best to revamp their practices, communicate their business value, and repurpose facilities once used for in-person learning and development. When effective, strategic learning capabilities are aligned to the business needs of the organization, learning leaders can go a long way toward ensuring their organizations can compete in an unpredictable and fast-changing environment.

Share this article on social media

Developing and upskilling existing employees problematic for a third of hiring leaders

 A new report from Glassdoor has revealed the burning issues facing talent acquisition leaders across the UK. The findings suggest increased workplace transparency and authentic employer branding can slow employee churn and attract talent.

Surveying talent acquisition, employee experience and employer branding specialists, Glassdoor’s State of Employer Branding report found the most significant hiring challenges employers are faced with today are:

  • Salary expectations not aligning with what the company pays (32%)
  • Best candidates receiving multiple offers from other companies (32%)
  • The company receiving too few qualified candidates (27%)
  • Applicants lacking the skills specified in the job description (23%)
  • Building a quality pipeline of job candidates takes too much time and resources (23%)

Furthermore, hiring leaders across the UK agreed that conditions have become more challenging since the pandemic. Compared to 2019, retaining employees is more difficult for more than half of (55%) talent acquisition specialists. A further 50%  found sourcing candidates with the right qualifications harder and 47% could no longer make competitive offers.

Internally, developing and upskilling the existing workplace was problematic for a third (34%) of hiring leaders and 28% said adapting to a remote or hybrid workforce was also challenging.

EMPLOYER BRANDING CAN WIN THE WAR FOR TALENT

Glassdoor’s research reveals that companies with a clear mission and a strong reputation for being a great workplace find it easier to stand apart from the competition and attract and retain talent.

Before 2020, many employers benefitted from established recruitment plans and office perks. But the upheaval caused by the pandemic allowed employees to challenge in-office norms and demand more of their employers.

According to Glassdoor, today employees overwhelmingly expect more flexible work options; mentions of hybrid increased 1600% in UK employee reviews on Glassdoor this year, and 39% of job hunters say flexibility is a critical consideration of where to work**. In addition, work has also become more personal, with 1 in 5 surveyed wanting their own values to align with the mission and culture of their employer.

In the report, nearly 7 in 10 UK hiring leaders (68%) agreed that their employer brand gave them the edge over competitors when hiring new talent. Additional Glassdoor research*** reveals job seekers who see a company brand at least 10 times are 8x more likely to apply than those who saw the brand once.

Internally, three-quarters (75%) of talent acquisition and employer branding specialists say they are in tune with the wants and needs of their employees and 82% agree their executive team engages with building their employer brand.

But what physically is being done by teams to strengthen their brand? The most common employee experience and engagement tasks carried out are:

  • Delivering diversity and inclusion programmes (59%)
  • Engagement surveys (59%)
  • Developing employee engagement programmes (55%)
  • Taking action on employee feedback (54%)
  • 360 reviews (48%)

Jill Cotton, Glassdoor Career Trends Expert commented: “As we reach the end of 2022, a new employer-employee dynamic has emerged. Employees are holding companies accountable for promises made and choosing to work for organisations whose values align with their own. Record job vacancies may have given job hunters the upper hand when choosing where to work. But our research shows that successful employers listen to and deliver upon the wants and needs of their workforce. Cultivating a strong employer brand helps companies stand apart from the competition by answering the ‘why’ someone should want to work for you.”

Share this article on social media

Half of deskless workers claim that COVID-19 worsened the training provisions

New research amongst HR managers and ‘deskless’ workers, including those in the hospitality, retail, and construction industries, reveals that 86% of HR heads and 69% of employees believe there is room for improvement when it comes to their employer’s approach to training and development.

The research, which was conducted as part of a new report from Cloud Assess, found that HR heads are conscious of the importance of upskilling, with 97% agreeing that training and development is vital to their company’s future success. Those surveyed thought that training can offer a range of benefits to their organisation, including boosting business performance, improving efficiency, and increasing staff retention and satisfaction.

Despite this, businesses continue to underestimate the extent of the current training crisis in vocational industries. Whilst the majority acknowledge that their training programmes could be improved, 85% of HR heads maintain that their company does offer comprehensive training to all employees. A significant proportion of deskless workers disagree. In fact, a third of workers believe their employer’s approach to training is limited or inconsistent.

The challenge has been amplified by the pandemic, with almost half of HR managers and deskless workers claiming that COVID-19 worsened the training provisions available to employees. This couldn’t have come at a worse time, given that the majority of HR managers (80%) and deskless workers (68%) think the need for training and development has increased in the last five years.

In addition, workers’ are increasingly prioritising training when it comes to choosing an employer, with deskless workers ranking upskilling opportunities in the top five most important workplace benefits. Similarly, over two-thirds of deskless workers stated that the training and development opportunities offered by their employer have a strong influence on their loyalty to the business.

The report also explores how workers want the upskilling they are demanding to be delivered. The majority (74%) prefer their training delivered via face-to-face or hybrid (a mixture of face-to-face and online) methods. Online training in isolation was found to be the least popular (12%) amongst staff, demonstrating a clear preference amongst deskless workers for hands-on training sessions which reflect the practical nature of their roles.

Rob Bright, CEO and Founder of Cloud Assess, commented: “Our research confirms what we already suspected. The world of work has changed forever and workers’ priorities have shifted. The real insight is that employers simply can’t afford to cut corners when it comes to training and development. It’s playing an increasingly important role in employee satisfaction and it needs to be delivered in a way that works for them. Plus, with millions of job vacancies across the UK, deskless workers are now in a position to choose a place to work based on these factors.

“It’s crucial that businesses acknowledge the wants and needs of this valuable talent pool and invest in upskilling their workforce effectively, or risk losing out in the fight for talent.”

Share this article on social media

86% of HR heads and 69% of employees believe L&D can be improved

New research by Cloud Assess, found that amongst HR managers and ‘deskless’ workers, including those in the hospitality, retail, and construction industries, 86% of HR heads and 69% of employees believe there is room for improvement when it comes to their employer’s approach to training and development.

According to findings, HR heads are conscious of the importance of upskilling, with 97% agreeing that training and development is vital to their company’s future success. Those surveyed revealed that training can offer a range of benefits to their organisation, including boosting business performance, improving efficiency, and increasing staff retention and satisfaction.

Despite this, businesses continue to underestimate the extent of the current training crisis in vocational industries. Whilst the majority acknowledge that their training programmes could be improved, 85% of HR heads maintain that their company does offer comprehensive training to all employees. A significant proportion of deskless workers disagree. In fact, a third of workers believe their employer’s approach to training is limited or inconsistent.

The challenge has been amplified by the pandemic, with almost half of HR managers and deskless workers claiming that COVID-19 worsened the training provisions available to employees. This couldn’t have come at a worse time, given that the majority of HR managers (80%) and deskless workers (68%) think the need for training and development has increased in the last five years.

In addition, workers are increasingly prioritising training when it comes to choosing an employer, with deskless workers ranking upskilling opportunities in the top five most important workplace benefits. Similarly, over two-thirds of deskless workers stated that the training and development opportunities offered by their employer have a strong influence on their loyalty to the business.

The report also explores how workers want the upskilling they are demanding to be delivered. The majority (74%) prefer their training delivered via face-to-face or hybrid (a mixture of face-to-face and online) methods. Online training in isolation was found to be the least popular (12%) amongst staff, demonstrating a clear preference amongst deskless workers for hands-on training sessions which reflect the practical nature of their roles.

Rob Bright, CEO and Founder of Cloud Assess, commented: “Our research confirms what we already suspected. The world of work has changed forever and workers’ priorities have shifted. The real insight is that employers simply can’t afford to cut corners when it comes to training and development. It’s playing an increasingly important role in employee satisfaction and it needs to be delivered in a way that works for them. Plus, with millions of job vacancies across the UK, deskless workers are now in a position to choose a place to work based on these factors.

“It’s crucial that businesses acknowledge the wants and needs of this valuable talent pool and invest in upskilling their workforce effectively, or risk losing out in the fight for talent.”

Share this article on social media

Younger demographics vying for in-person learning and development opportunities

Though no strangers to a digital life, research from global workforce creation company Unispace  has revealed that Gen Z rely heavily on the professional and social structure of the office, with 78% finding it easier to bond with colleagues in the workplace and 81% feeling disconnected from their peers when working from home.

Gen Z crave in-person socialisation 

The data, taken from a study of 3,000 office workers, a third of which were in the earlier stages of their career, also revealed that the majority (79%) of Gen Z respondents felt more active when working in the office, while among older workers this figure sits at 66%. Most early careers professionals (60%) also admitted that work-from-home restrictions made them value the office more whereas this figure stood at just 43% for older workers. This suggests that Gen Z values the structure, socialisation, and support that a physical office provides more than older members of the workforce.

A lack of peer-to-peer learning

According to the study, younger demographics are also vying for learning and development opportunities from peers, but want to be able to access this in person. The vast majority (80%) of Gen Z respondents indicated that access to training would encourage them back to the workplace. The same percentage said they would be happier to return to work if they knew their team was going to be in the office, underlining the importance of face time for those in the earlier stages of their careers.

Despite the evident value that the younger generation put on the physical workplace, just 11% say they are happy with the way their office is set up, which is indicative of a huge opportunity to better support Gen Z in the workplace and subsequently bolster early career recruitment and retention.

Stuart Finnie, Head of Design at Unispace, commented: “With Gen Zers now accounting for around a third of the global population, for employers looking to beat the competition, considerations must be made to improve the quality of the environments they provide. Those employers who consider their workplace and generational needs, will be able to not only engage and retain their best talent, but also attract new staff in our current candidate-led jobs market.”

Share this article on social media

87% of organisations are currently using coaching

Digital coaching platform, CoachHub has presented the findings of its 2023 Business Trends in Coaching survey, and it has identified coaching has become an integral part of learning and development for the modern organisation.

Coaching is among the top three tools in which companies are investing their learning and development budget at present. Business buyers surveyed stated that they see employee wellbeing as the top use case for coaching, followed closely by leadership development.

Professor Jonathan Passmore, Senior Vice President (Coaching) at CoachHub said: “For generations, coaches and clients have been experiencing the breadth of benefits that coaching brings, and it is truly wonderful to see that this is increasingly being heard at an organisational level.”

Alongside an increase in coaching spend is an increase in openness to the application of new technologies within people development, with almost two thirds (61%) of respondents stating that they believe in the potential of virtual reality in the sector.

Other key findings include:

  • 87% of organisations are currently using coaching
  • 44% of respondents say that coaching supports professional development, increasing performance, or learning new skills
  • 85% predicted that there would be growth in the demand for managers developing coaching skills in their organisation.

Passmore continued: “The evidence shows that the learning and development industry is fast embracing the benefits of virtual delivery. There is a clear demand for a coaching model which responds to the needs of the user at a time and a place that suits them,” continued Passmore. “It has never been a better time to democratise access to coaching, ensuring that coaching is for everyone, regardless of seniority or job title.”

Share this article on social media

LinkedIn’s vision is to create a skills-first approach to hiring and learning

LinkedIn announced that it acquired EduBrite, a Fremont, California-based SaaS learning platform focused on creating, hosting and deploying professional certificates.

Several members of the EduBrite team, including CEO Ajay Upadhyaya and co-founder Manish Gupta, will join LinkedIn when the transaction closes.

According to LinkedIn, the acquisition will enable it to integrate EduBrite’s certification assessment engine into its learning platform, making it simpler for the company to test and verify the skills people claim to possess.

The deal aims to help LinkedIn further deliver on its vision to create a skills-first approach to hiring and learning.

EduBrite was founded in 2009.

Share this article on social media