Tag: Recruitment

Half of workforce looking to reskill

In the latest survey from CV-Library, it’s been revealed that ‘The Great Resignation’ is set to continue with more than two thirds of the UK professional workforce saying they’ll look for a new role in 2022.

More than half of the workforce (57.6%) is planning to reskill or retrain next year with belief that it will make them more employable.  Other factors driving the reskilling are a desire for a more meaningful career, better long-term job security and being unable to find a suitable job with their current skills.

The top five reasons for moving on in 2022, according to the CV-Library survey were:

  1. 1%: want/need a career change
  2. 3%: higher salary
  3. 7%: the uncertainty of the pandemic delayed an inevitable decision
  4. 9%: more flexible working opportunities
  5. 2%: burnout

Lee Biggins, CEO and founder of CV-Library commented: “Employers can take action to prevent increased staff turnover. Offering top salaries is the obvious choice but investing in training and upskilling, offering remote working opportunities, and building strong internal teams, look to be the smartest moves businesses can take in 2022.”

Ken Brotherston, Managing Director at TALiNT Partners doesn’t necessarily agree. He weighed in: “Whilst I might quibble about the percentage of people claiming they will look for a new job, I do agree that there are a range of underlying challenges for employers which need to be addressed and that there is no single solution.”

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The retailer is on track to open another 1,000 stores

Lidl has announced a pay increase from next year and according to the supermarket chain, the rise in wage will make it the highest paying supermarket in the UK. The supermarket said higher rates will apply to the capital’s workforce. Lidl commented that “entry-level wages will increase from £9.50 to £10.10 an hour outside of London and £10.85 to £11.30 within the M25 from March 2022, with colleagues earning up to £11.40 and £12.25 respectively, depending on length of service.”

The increase represents a pay rise of more than 6% for some and this will benefit more than 80% of its staff. By comparison, the UK’s minimum wage for workers over 23 is set to rise from its current level of £8.91 an hour to £9.50 from April 2022.

It stated that the increase recognised “the hard work and dedication of frontline colleagues during the last 18 months of the pandemic.”

It comes after continued staff shortages in a market where employers are continuing to struggle to fill roles, affecting the hospitality and retail sectors.

Lidl is expanding and currently has more than 850 stores in Great Britain. According to reports it says it’s still on track to increase that to 1,000 by the end of 2023.

Nan Gibson, Lidl’s chief HR officer, commented to the BBC: “We do not expect to pass that on to customers in the form of price rises.” She said it was currently “very difficult” to recruit staff, adding: “We are competing for talent with all the other retailers and, indeed, other industries.”

Ms Gibson said Lidl’s pay rise was intended to retain existing staff “as far as possible”, but also to attract new workers.

Christian Härtnagel, chief executive at Lidl GB, said: “We have ambitious plans to grow our business across Great Britain, and to do that, we need to ensure we attract and look after the best talent at every level of our business.”

 

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Lack of transparency around salaries hinders women

A recent survey from Glassdoor, the jobs and insights agency, has found that women across the UK are at a disadvantage because of a lack of transparency around salaries. A mere 25% of full-time employees in the UK strongly agree that their employer is transparent about pay with 54% of workers admitting they aren’t comfortable discussing their salary with their boss.

The survey suggests that the lack of discussion around pay is contributing to inequality for women. Sixty-seven percent of female workers didn’t ask for a salary increase in 2020, which equates to 30% more than men. In the last year, 35% of those working in the female-dominated industries of education, healthcare, and hospitality asked for a wage increase compared to 62% of those working in the traditionally male-dominated world of finance and 56% in tech.

According to the results of the survey, women are also 26% less likely than their male counterparts to ask for more money in the next 12 months, with 37% of women planning to ask for a pay rise next year.

The survey revealed that over half (56%) of women admit they lack the confidence to ask for a pay rise and as a result, only 33% of female workers negotiated the salary of their last job offer (compared to 45% of men). Two in five (43%) women revealed that they simply accepted the salary that was offered to them (compared to 35 percent of men).

Nearly three in four of all employees (73 percent) got the wage increase they asked for last year, indicating that women will continue to miss vital opportunities to increase their earning potential.

Jill Cotton, Career Expert at Glassdoor commented: “Workplace transparency is a hallmark of many successful companies and more transparency is needed in the future. One in two women admit to lacking confidence at work – companies should open an honest discussion around salary from the point that the role is advertised and throughout the person’s time with the organisation. Having clear salary bands limits the need for negotiation which, as the Glassdoor research shows, has a detrimental effect on female employees’ ability to earn throughout their career.

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80% of industries reporting record job vacancies

According to the latest labour market stats from the ONS, October saw 29.3 million employees, up by 160,000 on the revised September statistics. However, it was noted that it’s possible these figures may change while furloughed staff, who were made redundant, work out their notice period. But responses to the ONS survey suggest that redundancy numbers are likely to be a small share of those still on furlough when the scheme came to an end.

The Labour Force Survey estimates that for July to September 2021 the employment rate increased 0.4 percentage points on the quarter, to 75.4%. ONS reported that the increase in employment was because of a record high net flow from unemployment to employment. Total job-to-job moves also increased to a record high, largely driven by resignations rather than dismissals, during the same period. The rise is also driven by an increase in part-time work and an increase in the number of people on zero-hour contracts, driven by young people.

The unemployment rate decreased 0.5 percentage points to 4.3% while the inactivity rate remained unchanged at 21.1%.

But we have yet to see the full effects of the end of the furlough scheme and the relevance of zero-hour contracts in these figures. David Head, Director at TALiNT Partners commented: “Zero-hour contracts, if implemented ethically between employer and employee, are perfect because they allow flexibility in the workforce and allow businesses to expand and contract whenever necessary. However, having vast numbers of people on zero-hour contracts will inevitably mask the true numbers of the unemployed.”

The latest figures show that the number of job vacancies in August to October 2021 continued to rise to a new record of 1,172,000. This is an increase of 388,000 from pre-pandemic numbers of January to March 2020 level, with 15 of the 18 industry sectors showing record highs.

During the quarter, annual growth in average total pay (including bonuses) was 5.8% and regular pay (excluding bonuses) was 4.9%. Annual growth in average employee pay has been affected by temporary factors that have inflated the headline growth rate. These factors are now waning and will have a smaller impact on growth rates, according to the report.

James Reed, Chairman of REED commented on the continued increase of job vacancies: “This ongoing rise in job vacancies is a positive sign of the economy’s continued revival. Rapid job creation means there are plenty of opportunities to go around, and not just for those recently off furlough, but also for others who have faced long or short-term unemployment as well as those already in work who are seeking a new challenge.

“After experiencing a cautious labour market during the pandemic when job opportunities were restricted and workers were less incentivised to move, there has never been a better time to look for a new role than now.”

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Reskilling workforce key to plugging skills shortage hole

The newest McKinsey Global Survey on reskilling has highlighted the urgency needed to address massive skills gaps across all industries. The accelerated move towards digitization and remote work has placed new demands on employees who now require different skills to support significant changes to the way they work and to the business priorities their companies are setting.

Most of the survey respondents said that skill building (more than hiring, contracting, or redeploying employees) is the best way to close skills gaps and that they have accelerated their efforts to reskill or upskill employees since the start of the pandemic. The results also pointed towards a shift in the most important skills to develop, which leaned towards being social and emotional in nature, for example, empathy, leadership, and adaptability.

The survey suggested that the need to address skill gaps is imperative with most respondents (58%) saying that closing skill gaps in their companies’ workforces has become a higher priority since the pandemic began. And of five key actions to close these gaps – hiring, contracting, redeploying, releasing, and building skills within the current workforce – skill building is more prevalent now than it was in the months preceding the pandemic. Sixty-nine percent of respondents said that their organizations do more skill building now than they did before the COVID-19 crisis.

The redeploying of talent to new roles often requires some degree of skill building and has become more commonplace over the past year with 46% of respondents reporting an increase in redeploying talent within their organizations.

Additionally, the results of the survey suggested that this commitment to skill building represents more than a one-time investment. More than half of respondents said that their companies plan to increase their spending on learning and skill building over the next year, compared with their investments since the end of 2019.

 

 

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As we come out of the pandemic, the economy has bounced back faster and stronger than anyone imagined and the number of jobs available are at record levels.

In general, it is always wise to treat dramatic headlines or simple phrases with a large pinch of salt. My rule of thumb is this: does the person promoting the headline have an interest in it being true? If so, approach with caution.

Likewise, any survey that takes ‘intent’ and translates it into ‘certainty’ should also be handled with care. For example, a statement that ‘60% ofcandidates intend to change jobs in the next six months’ does not mean that is what’s going to happen. For the last 10 years I have fully intended to lose 10kg and do a triathlon and yet both are but still unachieved!

Which brings me to the ‘great resignation’. Despite the ubiquity of the phrase, it’s been surprisingly hard to find compelling evidence to support that it’s actually happening.

Let’s look at the evidence in favour. As we come out of the pandemic, the economy has bounced back faster and stronger than anyone imagined and the number of jobs available are at record levels. It is also a fair assumption that there is an element of catch up from candidates who have wanted to change jobs since last year but were nervous about doing so. Another factor is that September is historically an active month for jobs changes.

It is also increasingly understood that employers who refuse to consider more flexible working patterns or who appeared indifferent to the challenges of their employees during the pandemic may suffer some sort of backlash. But the ‘great resignation?’ I’m not so sure.

Let’s consider the other side of the argument. Many industries are still very challenged with employees terrified, not just about changing jobs in their sector, but about losing the one they have. There are still around one million workers about to come off furlough which will have some impact on re-dressing the imbalance in the labour market.

And if we are to talk about the ‘great resignation’, we must also look to its equal and opposite force ‘the great retention.’ The vast majority of HR and TA people can not only read, but they can count and think and figure out that something needs to be done. Whether that’s increasing salaries (around20% should do it) creating more flexible working patterns even for employees who are still required to be on site for 100% of their jobs, looking at innovative learning and development initiatives and so on and so on, they know they need to respond, and they are.

So yes, we do have a truly unique labour market right now, and no, the mismatch between supply and demand won’t last forever. In the meantime there will be a higher degree of market movement than usual but ‘the great resignation?’ I don’t think so.

Whilst the pandemic has changed many things, it hasn’t changed the fact that the best employers attract and retain the best talent but that doesn’t make much of a headline.

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The series of TALiNT Partners’ awards continued with the TIARA Recruitment Awards – UAE hosted in Dubai on 4th November and resulted in a resounding success. Ken Brotherston, TALiNT Partners’ MD, shares his experiences of a great week spent exploring Dubai and workforce trends in the region. 

It’s been over 10 years since I last visited Dubai so I was more than a little interested to see how much it has changed since I was last there. I was also looking forward to the three events we had scheduled for the week as I was hoping they would give me some insight into the talent challenges in the region and how they compared to our experiences with other markets.  

On a physical basis Dubai just keeps getting bigger; the rate of new buildings in the last decade is astonishing, as is the continuing speed with which new ones are going up. The limited time I did have by the pool (honest!) was certainly not spent in quiet contemplation, given the constant cacophony of pile drivers and dumper trucks; and if the scale of construction is a sign (*and it generally is) then there is no lack of confidence about Dubai (and the wider UAE’s future). 

But what about from a people perspective? Our three key sessions gave a wide ranging perspective: the first, at London Business School’s campus in the Dubai International Financial Centre, brought together the Head Of Staffing for LinkedIn for the region, Susana Correia, Ron Thomas, a highly experienced CHRO and one of the local market’s foremost commentators on workforce trends, and Michael Morcos, Vice Chair of the Board Practice  at Korn/Ferry, the world’s largest organisational consulting firm in a discussion with a group of executive MBAs. The key takeaway from this session was undoubtedly a confirmation that capable senior execs (and especially those with transformations and/or project management capabilities) are in more demand than ever before and, as employers become ever more flexible, on how and where their key execs work with them – it is opening up entirely new talent pools.   

Our second session of the week was our Talent Conference, bringing together key employers, staffing solutions providers and HR tech firms to look at trends across the wider market. Peter Hogg, Talent Acquisition Director, Schneider Electric demonstrated the power of creating an internal talent market place whilst Ghenwa Habbal, Head of Talent Management, Ford Middle East & Africa discussed how to use a digital capability to create a total talent approach.  

Darren Grainger, MD of NES Fircroft emphasised the importance of strategic supplier partnerships; Jonathan Rook, Managing Director of Sova Assessment highlighted the possibilities of digital assessment, not least for some of the large nationalisation programmes going on across the region.  

It was also very powerful to hear Nihal B. Hammad, Director, Human Resources, Albatha Healthcare Group, talk about diversity in the region and whilst it is important to balance D&I initiatives with local customs and practices, progress is being made. No doubt some might say not fast enough but that’s a discussion for a separate blog. 

Our final event of the week was the culmination of our TIARA staffing campaign to recognise the achievements of a range of staffing firms and solutions providers in the region and it was fantastic to see some of the impressive work being done by so many firms across the region and in particular to celebrate our Recruitment Industry Leader of the Year, Aws Ismail, of Marc Ellis Group who judges commended for his investment in establishing a strong team, an open and supportive culture and for his support for his local community through an incredibly difficult year.  

The MENA region, and the UAE specifically, is continuing to go from strength to strength. As we look at new ways of working combined with, for example, nationalisation programmes, this will help to open up new markets in which to trade or sell services and create a larger pool of educated and engaged talent. And as the region works towards a longer-term strategy of relying less on an economy based on fossil fuels, the energy and dynamism of the region will create a lot of exciting opportunities for some time to come.  

By Ken Brotherston  

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Bullhorn, a global leader in cloud-based software for the staffing industry and Pixid, a European-owned cloud-based recruitment technology provider have joined forces to increase their service offering for their clients. This partnership is set to reinforce both enterprises’ position in key global recruitment markets.

The evolution of recruitment solutions ecosystem has seen innovative start-ups challenge larger enterprises. Bullhorn historically has actively sought out partnerships with those businesses offering the most innovative solutions. This has enabled Bullhorn customers to connect with other recruitment and HR systems.

PIXID VMS is the first global mid-market, fast-to-deploy, pay-as-you-go Vendor Management System (VMS) to implement a full two-way integration with Bullhorn. This is of major benefit for temporary staffing agencies and MSPs, who will now be able to connect these two very powerful tools.

The PIXID VMS solution enables temporary staffing agencies to streamline their contingent staffing processes and seamlessly connect with their end clients and workers. The new integration between Bullhorn and Pixid VMS, will allow recruitment suppliers to receive requests, identify, select and supply suitable candidates for contingent work assignments directly via the Bullhorn system, within seconds.

Group President of PIXID Group, Etienne Colella says: “PIXID Group has adopted a partnership strategy to connect the very best recruitment and staffing industry players to our state-of-the-art solutions. We look forward to growing further opportunities with Bullhorn as our markets in Europe and around the world expand.”

Peter Linas, CPO and EVP of Corporate Development at Bullhorn says: “We are delighted that Pixid Group has chosen to partner with Bullhorn. By combining PIXID VMS with our world-leading technology, Bullhorn users are now able to connect these two very powerful and complementary tools, giving them a competitive advantage by greatly expanding their abilities to provide rapid and reliable contingent staffing services to their clients via the Bullhorn platform.”

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Trinnovo Group the biggest winner of the night!

On Wednesday 20th October winners of the 2021 TIARA Recruitment Awards were revealed at a Gala Dinner for 450 guests at The Brewery in London, attended by CEOs and senior executives from the UK’s top 500 recruiters.

“Resilience is a fitting theme for the 2021 TIARA Recruitment Awards,” said Alex Evans, Programme Director TALiNT Partners. “The COVID-19 crisis hit the staffing sector hard in 2020, but those best able to optimise their talent, technology, and brand have taken advantage of new ways of working and competing for market leadership. This year’s winners are the champions of change that the industry needs to adapt and prosper to a constantly evolving talent market.”

This year’s Chair of Judges was leading human capital dealmaker Katie Folwell-Davies, Investment Director of Twenty 20 Capital. Commenting on this year’s finalists, she said: “Those companies that stood out for me were those that had invested through the pandemic – in headcount and technology – and had been able to demonstrate through their KPIs and their numbers the growth that was going to come from that investment.”

Jason Martin, Head of Strategy at Access Recruitment – headline partner of the TIARA Recruitment Awards – judged categories including the Best Recruitment Company to Work For and Recruitment Leader of the Year. “What has stood out in recent years, but even more so this year, was the focus on D&I and L&D,” he said. “I have really been impressed by the lengths that recruiters have gone to to invest in their people and the technology to support that. Those businesses have come out of lockdowns in the best shape to succeed over the next year.”

Trinnovo Group was the biggest winner of the night, taking the awards for Growth Recruitment Company of the Year, Best Recruitment Company to Work For with revenues between £20m and £50m, and Recruitment Leader of the Year for its founder and chairperson Ashley Lawrence.

Reed Global chairman James Reed was inducted into the TIARA Hall of Fame for his successful international expansion of Reed, spearheading the Keep Britain Working campaign in 2020, and for being a high-profile champion of the recruitment sector and its economic contribution.

The 2021 TIARA Recruitment Awards campaign was supported by headline partner Access Recruitment and supporting sponsors including: 6Cats International, Blackwood Capital, Clearwater International, Fore:Two Group, Gambit Corporate Finance, Grant Thornton, Mercury, Mishcon de Reya, Odro, Parasol Group, PurePro, Saffery Champness, Sonovate, Twenty20 Capital  and VacancySoft.

The full list of TIARA Recruitment Award winners and highly commended finalists is as follows:

The Saffery Champness Hall of Fame Award

  • Winner: James Reed, Chairman, Reed Global

The PurePro Back Office Team of the Year

  • Winner: NRL

The Sonovate Client Service Award

  • Winner: Sigmar Recruitment

The Access Group Tech Transformation Award

  • Winner: Advantage Resourcing
  • Highly Commended: Omni

The Fore:Two Group Candidate Service Award

  • Winner: ersg

The Blackwood Capital Diversity & Inclusion Award

  • Winner: Goodman Masson
  • Highly Commended: Trinnovo Group

The Odro Innovation Award

  • Winner: La Fosse Associates

The VacancySoft Marketing Campaign of the Year

  • Winner: Signify Technology

The Clearwater Growth Recruitment Company of the Year

  • Winner: Trinnovo Group

The 6Cats International Recruitment Company of the Year

  • Winner: NES Fircroft

The Grant Thornton Specialist Recruitment Company of the Year

  • Winner: Signify Technology
  • Highly Commended: NHS Professionals

The Parasol Group Temporary Recruitment Company of the Year

  • Winner: TFS Healthcare

The Mercury Best Recruitment Company to work for (£5m to £20m)

  • Winner: The Barton Partnership
  • Highly Commended: Xpertise Recruitment

The Twenty20 Capital Best Recruitment Company to work for (£20m – £50m)

  • Winner: Trinnovo Group
  • Highly Commended: JCW Group

The Gambit Best Recruitment Company to Work For (£50m+)

  • Winner: Amoria Bond

The Mishcon de Reya Recruitment Leader of the Year

Winner: Ashley Lawrence, Chairperson, Trinnovo Group

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A positive candidate experience is likely to result in job offer acceptance

Job vacancies across the UK have reached a record high of 1.03million. When considering the war for talent and according to screening and identity services firm, Sterling, employers must streamline onboarding processes or risk losing candidates to the competition.

Research has found that 60% of job seekers abandon the application process if it takes too long or is too complex with a separate study suggesting that a positive candidate experience makes a candidate 38% more likely to accept a job offer from a company.

Steve Smith, Managing Director, Sterling EMEA commented: “There is no doubt that acute skills shortages across the UK are driving the need for efficient onboarding processes. With rising vacancy numbers and competition for talent intensifying, employers must quite simply streamline background screening processes or risk losing candidates in the process.

“With UK employment now at pre-pandemic levels employers across almost every sector are crying out for skills – and in this jobseeker-driven market, candidate experience can become your competitive advantage.”

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