Tag: Recruitment

UK businesses have lagged the rest of the world over the past year when it comes to recruiting and retaining talent, according to a new study.

Outsourcing company KellyOCG surveyed more than 1,000 senior executives across 13 countries – Australia, Canada, China, Germany, India, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia, Netherlands, Singapore, Switzerland, the UK and the US – for its Global Workforce Agility Report.

It found that less than half (42%) of the UK firms surveyed thought their ability to recruit talent had improved over the past year, significantly lower than the global average of 59%. The only country that fared worse was Ireland, where only 39% of firms said they had improved their recruitment.

UK employers were also falling behind in terms of retention. While more than half (53%) said their ability to retain talent had improved over the past 12 months, this fell short of the global average of  62%.

One key reason for this was the pandemic, with the majority (55%) of UK employers saying it had had a negative impact on younger employees’ career development and progression in particular.

However, UK businesses also reported that employee satisfaction and wellbeing had fallen over the past 12 months. In this area, the UK ranked the lowest of all the countries covered, with less than half (39%) of UK firms saying employee satisfaction had improved over the last year.

Sam Smith, Vice-President and Managing Director of KellyOCG EMEA, said: “We know that the war for talent has intensified over the past few years, and the Covid-19 pandemic has clearly increased this pressure. Our data shows that the majority of UK businesses have struggled to improve their ability to recruit talent over the past year and clearly many are also struggling to successfully retain talent.”

Diversity drag

Worryingly given the political climate, UK firms were also not as committed to implementing hiring and promotion goals for talent from underrepresented groups, with 69% of UK companies saying this was the case versus 76% globally.

“They have to increase their focus on DEI and wellbeing, as well their own understanding of existing talent within the business in order to stand out. Age-old formulas are no longer going to be enough for employees and the sooner firms realise this, the sooner they can make the changes they need to create a more effective and successful strategy,” said Smith.

Moving forward, the researchers found that UK firms did not have a clear idea of how to turn things around. Only 40% said they knew the optimal mix of talent needed across their business. In addition, just 36% said they had a clear view of how talent strategy was linked to tangible business outcomes, significantly lower than the global average of 49%.

The UK respondents also failed to recognise the importance of improving the employee experience, with just over half (57%) saying this was as important as improving the customer experience. This was the second lowest rate globally and far behind the global average of 73%.

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The number of job vacancies in the UK has now surpassed pre-pandemic levels, with falls in redundancy and unemployment levels also pointing to much brighter prospects for UK workers than was the case a year ago.

 

The latest figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) showed that there were 862,000 vacancies in the April to June period, 77,500 more than in January to March 2020.

 

The ONS also reported that redundancy rates had fallen back to pre-pandemic levels during the quarter, with the unemployment rate falling 0.2 percentage points to 4.8%.

 

However, the number of payrolled employees has only risen above the levels seen before the first lockdown in some regions – the North East, North West, East Midlands and Northern Ireland.

 

Across the UK as a whole, while the number of employees rose 356,000 in June to 28.9 million, this figure remains 206,000 below February 2020 levels, suggesting that while there may be a high number of vacancies, some are going unfilled.

 

Indeed, Neil Carberry, Chief Executive of the Recruitment & Employment Confederation (REC), said: “Demand for staff is incredibly high right now, and recruiters are working flat out to fill roles – but serious worker shortages across the economy threaten to slow the recovery, especially in sectors like logistics, hospitality and IT.

 

“Firms need to be thinking hard about their offer to potential employees at a time like this, and government can support them by addressing long-standing business concerns about how the skills system supports our economy.”

 

‘Stick rather than twist’

Some of the shortages have come about due to the rapid reopening of the UK economy, but Tania Bowers, Legal Counsel and Head of Public Policy at APSCo, said there are also other factors at play.

 

“Aside from the struggles that staffing companies faced as hiring stalled at the beginning of the pandemic, available talent pools have also been impacted by both Brexit and the roll out of Off Payroll earlier this year.

 

“Temporary resources play a critical role in filling both sudden spikes in demand and resourcing gaps, but this segment of the workforce has been significantly impacted as IR35 was rolled out and the ability to tap into European contingent resources became unnecessarily complex following the UK’s exit from the Bloc.”

 

Emotional factors are also playing a part, added Kieran Boyle, Managing Director at CBK Recruitment: “We’ve found the candidate side of the market is as quiet as we have known, with very few people actively looking to make a move at present.

 

“The pandemic has created a safety first mindset, with people choosing to stick rather than twist. In certain sectors of the market, such as insurance, there are a phenomenal amount of vacancies, which has pushed salaries up as firms compete to nab what little talent there is available.”

 

Vacancies would seem to be leading to pay increases in other industries as well, with the ONS data showing that growth in annual average pay for the March to May period was an inflation-busting 7.3% for total pay and 6.6% for regular pay (excluding bonuses).

 

However, the ONS noted the rises were perhaps not quite as impressive as the first appeared: “Annual growth in average employee pay is being affected by temporary factors that have inflated the increase in the headline growth rate. These are compositional effects where there has been a fall in the number and proportion of lower-paid employee jobs so increasing average earnings and base effects where the latest months are now compared with the start of the coronavirus pandemic, when earnings were first affected and pushed down.”

 

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UK employers are struggling with the worst labour shortages for almost a quarter of a century as the reopening of the economy continues.

The Recruitment & Employment Confederation (REC) warned that the availability of workers was deteriorating at a record pace, fuelled by factors such as increased hiring, Brexit, pandemic-related uncertainty and the furlough scheme.

The latest REC/KPMG UK Report on Jobs survey revealed that in June permanent staff appointments expanded at the fastest rate since the survey began in October 1997, while temp billings grew at their highest level for nearly 23 years.

But during the same time period, the availability of workers fell at an unprecedented rate, leading to a sharp increase in starting rates of pay.

The demand for staff continued to move beyond crisis-hit sectors such as hospitality, with jobs in IT and computing rising the fastest in June, followed by hotel and catering jobs and engineering.

Claire Warnes, Partner and Head of Education, Skills and Productivity at KPMG UK, said the latest figures showed action was needed to address the country’s skills gap: “For the fourth month running we’re seeing a decline in the availability of candidates to fill all these new roles and the most severe deterioration for 24 years. We need action from businesses and government to reskill and upskill furloughed and prospective workers now more than ever, as the increasing skills gap in the workforce has the potential to slow the UK’s economic recovery.”

Neil Carberry, Chief Executive of the REC, added: “Recruiters are working flat out to fill roles across our economy. The jobs market is improving at the fastest pace we have ever seen, but it is still an unpredictable time. We can’t yet tell how much the ending of furlough and greater candidate confidence will help to meet this rising demand for staff. In some key shortage sectors like hospitality, food, driving and IT, more support is likely to be needed to avoid slowing the recovery.

“That means supporting transitions into growing sectors through unemployment support and new skills programmes, as well as making sure the new immigration system reacts to demand, as promised. But it also means that hiring companies need to re-assess their workforce plans. In a tight jobs market, working with professional recruiters to position your firm as an employer of choice is a must.”

Further pain ahead

The situation is likely to get even worse when the travel industry gets back on its feet if the results of a separate survey are to be believed.

Ahead of Grant Schapps’ announcement of the scrapping of home quarantine for fully vaccinated travellers, job board CV-Library ran a survey of travel and tourism workers and found that almost 60% were not planning to return to the industry.

Of those responding to the survey, 68.4% believed the industry would face a shortage of workers, with  58.1% saying they weren’t considering returning even once the industry is fully operational again.

When asked why they were turning their back on the industry, the main reason was that it had shut down and jobs were no longer available. However, almost a third of respondents (30%) said they felt the industry was too unpredictable and almost half (47.2%) felt that the salaries and benefits on offer were now worse than in pre-pandemic times.

Lee Biggins, CEO and founder of CV-library, said: “These results should be alarming for employers, but, sadly, they aren’t surprising. We’ve all witnessed the impact of this pandemic on the hospitality sector and the travel and tourism industry has been the hardest hit sector of all. As such, a shortage of candidates when the restrictions are lifted feels somewhat inevitable.

“It’s crucial that businesses take notice of these results and listen to job seekers. There are plenty of staff out there but, in order to recruit, businesses can’t just pick up where they left off. Competitive pay and benefits must be offered, and with the industry unlikely to be provided with much notice to get back up and running, those with the strongest employer proposition will win the race for talent.”

Graduate solution?

One potential avenue employers grappling with shortages may wish to explore is adapting some of their positions to appeal to the graduate market.

Though vacancy numbers as a whole may be rising, in the graduate market the reverse is true: data from job board network Broadbean showed that graduate and training vacancies were down 66% on pre-pandemic levels in the first half of this year, as well as being down 34% on the first half of last year, when the country was in the thick of the pandemic.

This has led to a situation where the number of applicants per graduate vacancy now stands at 51, up 46% on 2019 numbers.

Alex Fourlis, Managing Director at Broadbean Technology, said: “It is concerning to see that graduate and early careers recruitment is faring considerably worse than other areas of the employment market.

“The fact that vacancy levels today are considerably lower than during the pandemic suggests that while employers are investing in experienced talent at a time when many sectors are contending with skills shortages, there is a real threat that this dearth of talent will be exacerbated in the coming months and years if graduate and early careers recruitment isn’t prioritised by companies.”

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The Freelancer & Contractor Services Association (FCSA) has launched revised Codes of Compliance, which it says are tougher and even more transparent than previous versions.

Following a review that took five months, the new codes provide added assurance to agencies, hirers and contractors, according to the FCSA.

In particular, member firms must now provide more transparency to contractors, particularly in relation to holiday pay in umbrella employment contracts and on payslips.

Umbrella companies have come under repeated fire this year, with claims some unscrupulous providers withhold holiday pay and other benefits owed to workers. In April MP Ruth Cadbury went as far as to call for umbrella firms to be banned due to “significant malpractice” in the industry.

Legitimate umbrella providers have argued, however, that especially given the introduction of new IR35 rules earlier this year, there’s a clear need for such structures.

“As market conditions change so too must our codes,” said Phil Pluck, the FCSA’s Chief Executive. “This is to ensure the highest standards of compliance are continued to be met by our member firms. Which is why now, we’re announcing the launch of our latest Code revisions.

“The most comprehensive and compliant set of evidence-based standards now exist in our sector. No one else in the sector can give contractors or the supply chain this level of assurance.”

The FCSA has also introduced new pre-requisite and due diligence checks on all new applicants, which must be passed before proceeding to the accreditation assessment stage.

It said each step in the assessment process is conducted by independent and regulated accountants and solicitors, all with considerable experience in the sector. No member of FCSA staff, the board or membership are involved in this process.

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E-current account provider Unizest has launched a new service to help international candidates open a bank account in the UK and enable recruiters to offer a better start to new overseas workers by arranging payments.

Supported by Mastercard and Railsbank – and recruiters including Response RecruitmentAustralasian Recruitment Company and Tri Consulting – Unizest allows workers and students coming to the UK to open an e-current account before they leave their home country and they receive their Debit Mastercard upon arrival.

“On a daily basis, we have overseas workers walking off the street into our office looking for employment,” says John Devine, MD at Response Recruitment. “Many can’t open a traditional UK bank account but obviously need to set up a basic banking service. We can now offer Unizest’s new e-current account. It’s a win-win for recruiters, their clients and candidates,”.

Matt Oldham, co-founder of Neofin Ventures – the company behind Unizest’s launch – says; “Our aim with Unizest is to ensure that all newcomers to the UK, whether that be for work or for study, are given the best start when embarking on their new life here. We want to help smooth the transition by removing one of the biggest hurdles they face – setting up basic banking services. By kick-starting the process of getting an account, before new hires even arrive in the UK, Unizest enables businesses to focus on the many other processes and aspects of recruitment.”

Unizest, which has attained Pending B Corp® status, has become an approved service partner of the Association of Labour Providers (ALP), which promotes responsible recruitment. “We are pleased to welcome Unizest as an ALP service partner and look forward to their e-current account helping to promote good practice,” says David Camp, chief executive of the ALP.

It has also partnered with Just Good Work to provide overseas workers with independent advice and guidance on work and life in the UK – including rights and obligations, recruitment and employment information directly on the app.

“People coming to a new country to work or study are making a big life change,” says Quintin Lake, director of Just Good Work. “By partnering with Unizest, Just Good Work provides practical help and support at every stage in multiple languages. Whether that be understanding how things work here or getting sound advice in avoiding deception or exploitation. We are excited to be supporting Unizest, who share our desire to protect and support people newly arriving in the UK”.

Unizest customers can manage their money through the Unizest app – available to download on iOS and Android. Onboarding includes five steps, linking to the Home Office Share Code to ensure customers have a confirmed right to reside in the UK, making the set up simple for Unizest users.

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Claire Leigh, managing director of Brampton Recruitment, shares her thoughts on holiday pay and how temporary workers can ensure they receive what they are entitled to.

Temporary workers have a contract with an agency, but work on a temporary basis for an employer. This differentiates them from full-time employees and the self-employed.

The Agency Worker’s Regulations (2010) which details a worker’s rights, state that all temporary workers are entitled to a minimum of 28 days holiday a year, pro rata.

As temporary workers may not have consistent hours, many do not understand how to calculate their holiday pay and entitlement.

Holiday pay is accrued at a rate of 12.07 per cent of gross pay, therefore it is important that workers keep a detailed record of their earnings.

To put this into context, if a temporary worker is paid £7.50 per hour they will accrue holiday pay at the rate of just over 90p per hour.

Keeping a record of how many hours they have worked may also be useful for temporary workers, but is not essential for calculating holiday pay.

Twelve weeks

Although holiday pay begins accruing immediately, after twelve weeks a temporary worker is entitled to the same working conditions and basic pay, or to be paid within the same salary bracket as a permanent member of staff doing comparable work.

In terms of holiday pay, this means if permanent workers are entitled to more than the minimum of 28 days paid holiday, a temporary worker should receive the same if they have been working for more than twelve weeks.

However, employer benefits which are calculated through a payroll system, such as healthcare might not be offered to a temporary member of staff. After twelve weeks if a temporary worker is with the same agency they will be enrolled onto an autoenrollment pension.

Help and advice

Recruitment agencies should be the first point of contact for any temporary workers concerned or confused about holiday pay or benefits. At Brampton Recruitment, we explain these rights upon registration and again upon placing a candidate in a role.

Temporary workers who have found their role through Brampton Recruitment will have this information in writing in a new starter pack, however we encourage anybody registered with us to get in contact for further advice if it is required.

Alternatively, the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS) provides advice on all areas of employment law, on its website and helpline.

As more people are turning to temporary work, it is essential that this growing pool of workers are aware of their rights. Although legislation can be confusing, help is available to ensure temporary workers fully understand their entitlement to paid holiday and other benefits.

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The Recruitment & Employment Confederation has welcomed an Employment Tribunal decision that ruled that a temporary worker did not accrue holiday leave while on furlough, saying it provides much needed clarity for recruitment agencies.

Mr D Perkins v The Best Connection Group Limited (TBCGL) concerned a contract for services worker who had been placed on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS).

The Tribunal was asked to consider whether or not the claimant should be entitled to accrue holiday pay while furloughed. It ruled he should not because he was not a worker for the purposes of the Working Time Regulations 1998.

It also highlighted that the terms of his contract with the agency were such that the agreement only existed when he was on assignment. It specified that he would not “receive payment from TBC or its clients for any time not spent on assignment whether in respect of holidays, illness or absence for any other reason”.

As he was unable to work for TBCGL while on furlough, the judge ruled the claimant could not be interpreted to be on assignment.

The ruling is aligned with government guidance on the accrual of holiday pay for furloughed agency workers, which states: “Some agency workers on a contract for services may not be entitled to the accrual of holiday or to take holiday under the Working Time Regulations while on furlough because they are not workers or treated as workers under those regulations when between assignments or otherwise not working on assignments.”

Lorraine Laryea, Director of Recruitment Standards and Compliance at the REC, said: “One of the major issues for recruiters in 2020 as they considered whether to engage with the new Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) to furlough temporary workers, was whether holiday and holiday pay would accrue for those workers who were placed on furlough.

“The REC lobbied the government extensively to release guidance on exactly this, which resulted in advice being published in May 2020. However, this isn’t statutory guidance and it’s important to bear in mind that the judgment is a first instance decision, meaning that other Employment Tribunals presented with similar cases could reach a different decision.

“However, the analysis in this case, which draws out the specific nature of temporary workers on contracts for services and the interaction with the holiday pay legislation and furlough provisions, is compelling and in the view of the REC more accurately reflects how the law should apply in these types of claims.”

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People analytics solution will support recruiters managing hybrid & home working teams

Access Recruitment has added to its growing portfolio of staffing industry SaaS solutions with the acquisition of Bristol based NorthStar, whose solution brings appraisal, recruitment analytics and businesses mapping together in one place.

“We are passionate about innovating to help recruiters run and grow their businesses,” said Paul Vogel, MD of Access Recruitment. “The addition of NorthStar to our portfolio of recruitment software allows agencies to translate their data into meaningful action. With many businesses now operating hybrid home/office teams, it has never been more important to have full visibility of your business operations and also critically to support your consultants to develop their skills.

“We have a long history of working together, with NorthStar originally being built around our CRM product, Access RDB. The platform has evolved to support a range of recruitment agencies across the UK and ANZ and integrates with multiple CRMs, including our latest cloud-based offering, Access Recruitment CRM.”

A major challenge for agencies is managing a growing number of consultants as well as tracking key KPIs as they scale. Access NorthStar enables individual consultants to identify where they are performing well and show areas for improvement. Scores can be shared with their peers to create healthy competition and gives team leaders a ready-made appraisal tool to use with their consultants.

APSCO’s UK Recruitment Index, published in October 2020, highlighted that automation and better use of technology was a key area of improvement, with 40% of recruitment firms with net fee income (NFI) greater than £10 million scoring themselves below 7 out of 10 – and 35% of those with less than £2 million NFI scored lower than 5. The report also highlighted that the largest firms with NFI of £50 million+ gave themselves low scores for retaining talent.

NorthStar was created to solve these challenges by automating analytics to enable better staff performance and engagement by highlighting areas where productivity can be enhanced. The platform pulls data from within an agency’s recruitment CRM visualising it across configurable consultant, team and senior leader dashboards.

 

“We are so proud of the Northstar product and where the team have taken it,” said Darren Ryemill, founder of NorthStar. “For us, choosing The Access Group as an acquirer was a no-brainer, because we felt that they would be the best people to take the product even further and fulfil its full potential. We are really excited to see where they take to next.”

To find out more, visit www.theaccessgroup.com/recruitment/software/productivity-performance-software/

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Despite the huge increase in job listings over the past few months, an even greater increase in the number of unemployed people has led to a sharp rise in the number of jobseekers per vacancy.

Analysis by online job search engine Adzuna and the Institute for Employment Studies found that despite the record number of vacancies advertised in June, on average the number of claimant unemployed per advertised role had risen to 2.2, up from 1.2 in March.

While the research found that there were more than a million jobs available in June, with more than 300,000 new vacancies advertised in the past week alone, it also pointed to a mismatch between the location and skills of jobseekers and the roles on offer.

Disparities between regions meant that in 30 locations there were more than 10 unemployed claimants chasing every vacancy, while in almost 100 areas there were more than five claimants for each job.

Ex-industrial, inner city and ‘Red Wall’ areas, where inequalities predated the pandemic, were found to be worst affected by imbalances in supply and demand.

Tony Wilson, Director of the Institute for Employment Studies, said: “Since the turn of the year we’ve gone from talking about an unemployment crisis to a recruitment crisis.  But the reality is that we’re facing a bit of both – with many firms struggling to fill jobs at the same time that more than two million people are struggling to find work. These problems are particularly acute in many of those areas that were faring worse before the crisis began and that are most in need of support as we come out of it.

“Government deserves credit for helping to avoid a jobs catastrophe last year.  But if we don’t act quickly now to help employers to fill jobs and the unemployed to take them up then we could be setting a timebomb for next year of labour shortages, higher inflation and long-term unemployment.”

Skills gap widening

This sentiment was echoed by Neil Carberry, Chief Executive of the Recruitment & Employment Confederation, which found in its latest JobsOutlook survey that business confidence in the UK economy had turned positive for the first time since June 2018.

“This surge in employers’ confidence in the UK economy is remarkable – an improvement of 61 percentage points from the previous quarter as restrictions were lifted and businesses started to open again. Positivity about hiring has steadily improved alongside that, and we are now seeing the highest levels of confidence for five years.

“However, we are seeing labour and skills shortages across the economy right now, which the pandemic has made worse. These could threaten to slow down the recovery if not addressed quickly. It’s vital that companies and governments come together and improve access to training and support for everyone who needs it, so that jobseekers are able to find work in those sectors that are growing.”

Part of the issue is that the pandemic has brought about enormous growth in some sectors, but led to a drop-off in others, meaning many of those out of work aren’t immediately suited to the roles on offer.

Adzuna’s analysis, using Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures, showed that while trade and construction jobs have doubled compared with March 2020 and logistics and warehousing and manufacturing vacancies have more than trebled, other sectors have been flat or seen little growth.

For example, accounting/finance, legal, energy, healthcare/nursing and graduate jobs had all seen growth of 4% or less, with graduate roles actually declining slightly since March 2020.

Andrew Hunter, co-founder of Adzuna, explained: “Many of the people currently out of work aren’t matching up to the jobs on offer, despite an acute talent shortage. This means many jobs are lying unfilled and accumulating, inflating overall hiring volumes.

“Upskilling and retraining will be crucial to ensure this talent flows where it’s needed. Wider moves to help people into jobs, including better childcare support and regular, flexible hours will play a part.”

The Adzuna/Institute for Employment Studies report called on the government to help employers and jobseekers by getting Jobcentre Plus back up and running and by offering funding for retraining in shortage sectors.

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The UK construction sector is experiencing the highest levels of demand in years as it strives to recover from the delays and disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Of course, this is good news for economic recovery, but David McCormack, CEO of HIVE360, says he is concerned for the mental health and welfare of workers as the sector looks to meet the resourcing challenge.

Workers in high demand

The construction sector needs an extra 217,000 workers by 2025 to meet the post-pandemic bounce-back. *According to the CITB’s Construction Skills Network, most English regions will experience an increase in construction workers, with the East Midlands (1.7%) and West Midlands (1.4%) set to lead demand*.

Over half (53%) of the 2.8 million people working in UK construction are self-employed, on an agency or zero-hours contract, so companies throughout the construction sector supply chain will inevitably turn to recruiters for help with finding and supplying workers.

The creation of new job opportunities is positive, but employers in the sector must follow best practice guidelines and be legally compliant – including with the new IR35 rules – to ensure existing and new workers are treated fairly.

Worker welfare and wellbeing

Globally, the construction industry has one of the poorest records for employee mental health and suicide. The UK’s Office for National Statistics reports the suicide rate in construction is over three times more than the national average – about 400 workers in the UK’s construction and engineering sectors take their own live each year.

UK construction workers are also vulnerable to modern slavery, which covers forced labour and human trafficking.

Modern slavery is the illegal exploitation of people for personal or commercial gain. It is estimated that there is a large number of people experiencing modern slavery within the UK construction industry**.  Labour employed via sub-contractors or agents are considered most at-risk.

Last year, the government published its long-awaited response to its consultation on transparency in supply chains. Among the measures is a commitment to ‘mandating the key topics that modern slavery statements must cover’, with civil penalties for non-compliance anticipated in ‘due course’. In March 2021, the government launched a new online registry for modern slavery statements, to enable more informed scrutiny of an organisation’s approach to supply chains, with the comparative quality of statements available for all to see.

The risks from modern slavery can occur anywhere in a construction company’s operations – whether this is through direct employment, contractors or subcontractors – and can include failure to pay workers the UK minimum wage, and child labour in extended supply chains.

All construction workers have the right to control their wages, have a written employment contract, be paid on time, keep their passport, choose where they want to stay, change their job, or join a union. As well as this, they should be treated with respect, paid fairly and protected by the law.

The Construction Protocol

The Gangmasters & Labour Abuse Authority (GLAA), is a Non-Departmental Public Body of the UK Government, and a national enforcement agency whose role is to protect workers from labour exploitation.

To tackle modern slavery in the construction sector, the GLAA has collaborated with leading construction companies to create the Construction Protocol, which brings in the same measures and guidelines seen in the fresh food sector that protect the health and wellbeing of workers.

All signatories have agreed to raise awareness within supply chains to help to prevent and protect construction workers from exploitation or abuse, and take necessary steps to ensure exploitation and abuse of workers is recognised and addressed with appropriate safeguards put in place to ensure that exploitative practice is not repeated.

As a GLAA license holder and signatory of the Construction Protocol, HIVE360 is committed to helping participating companies with payroll and worker wellbeing.

Added benefits

HIVE360 is an expert in recruitment agency PAYE outsourced payroll,  and our HMRC-compliant payroll solution guarantees a speedy and transparent service, with no nasty fees for workers. It also delivers efficiency gains from our payroll, digital payslips, pensions auto-enrolment and pay documentation support.

HIVE360 goes further with our unique customisable engagement app Engage.

Provided as a standard element of our outsourced payroll solution, Engage gives workers access to a range of health and wellbeing benefits and services: 24/7, confidential access to mental health support, counsellors and GPs, 1000s of high street and online discounts, huge mobile phone savings, online training resources, along with a secure digital payslips portal and a real-time workplace pension dashboard to support employees’ financial wellbeing. To ensure the safety of employees in the workplace, we have also introduced an incident reporting system which allows workers to raise serious issues or concerns with their employer directly through the app, anonymously if they choose to.

HIVE360 is an outsourced payroll and employee benefits expert that is championing a new model of employment administration and redefining employment and pension administration processing. Visit: www.hive360.com

References

*CITB: Construction Skills Network forecasts 2021-2025: UK

**GLAA: Construction Industry Protocol

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