Tag: salary bands

Lack of salary increases and growth opportunities identified as top issues

Two new reports published by 360Learning have indicated that the Learning and Development sector has some challenges to deal with. The reports revealed that 42% of UK L&D professionals had not received a pay rise in recent months, and a further 23% believe they do not have opportunities to develop at work.

The reports, which look at salaries, progression, and satisfaction in corporate Learning and Development (L&D) teams across the US and UK, have the following findings:

In the UK:

  • The most common annual salary range was found to be between £30-£39k a year
  • The average salary comes in at £31.6k
  • People working in voluntary sectors were likely to earn less than £39k
  • People in the private sector had the best chance of earning more than £80k
  • 25% of L&D Managers earned between £50-£59k
  • Administrators in the L&D environment earned the least at below £39k

In the US:

  • The most common salary range was $70-$100k
  • The mean salary across all roles was much higher than the UK average, at $91.2k
  • 41% of L&D Managers earned more than $100k
  • Instructional Designers and Learning Specialists in the L&D environment earned the least, at less than $70k

The gender pay gap is also clear in the results with:

  • One-third of UK women earn less than the national average (£31,285) compared to only a fifth of men
  • Half of the women in the UK earned less than £39k, compared to only 36% of men
  • Only a quarter of women said they earn more than £40k, versus 41% of men in similar roles

When looking at reasons for lack of advancement, in the UK, 6% of women report that childcare and family are stopping them from growing at work, compared to just 1% of men.

In the US, 4% of people cite personal or family reasons for preventing advancement.

The studies also looked at salary satisfaction. Interestingly, despite gender and role disparities, 53% of L&D professionals in the UK and US were satisfied with their salaries, with the satisfaction increasing per age bracket.

In the UK:

  • 56% of men and 55% of women were satisfied with their earnings
  • 58% of men and 59% of women between 25 and 45 were also happy with their incomes.
  • 42% of UK professionals haven’t had a pay rise in more than 12 months
  • Of the professionals who had not had a pay rise, 54% admitted that they’re not comfortable asking for one
  • Among the professionals who did receive pay rises, 52% were below the rate of inflation, with 45% as low as 1%-3% – half the rate of inflation

In the US:

  • 80% of professionals have had a raise in the past two years
  • 20% have had no raise at all or last had a raise three or more years ago
  • If they have had a pay rise, 38% saw a 1-3% increase
  • 10% of professionals had enjoyed a salary increase of 10% or more over the past 12 months. 41% were “comfortable” or “very comfortable” about asking for pay rises

As far as the impact of education and career experience on salary is concerned, the survey found that 74% of higher salaries across the UK went to people aged over 45; however, 73% of the over 45s surveyed had been in the L&D industry for less than a year.

It would appear that qualifications do not have much influence on compensation. Most of the UK respondents don’t have an L&D-related degree. Of the respondents who earned more than £70k a year – only 7% had degrees or higher. However, in the highest salary bracket, only 2% of people without an L&D-related degree earn more than £80,000 compared to 6% of respondents who do. Clearly,  L&D degrees can lead to higher salaries when it comes to senior roles.

In the US, where wages were higher than $70k, there were almost equal numbers of people with L&D degrees and those without, indicating that on-the-job training via mentors, upskilling, and learning management systems can be an effective route to progression.

The survey provided insights into the roles of mentors in earning potential. For example, the respondents who had a salary of more than $100k a year were more likely to have mentors than those earning lower salaries. Similarly, professionals with a 4% or higher salary increase in the previous 12 months were also likely to have had a mentor.

Generally speaking, mentorship numbers are higher in the US than in the UK. Of the US respondents, 65% of professionals agreed that they benefitted from mentoring, while only 47% in the UK said the same. These numbers could correlate with the fact that 20% of male and 21% of female L&D professionals in the UK feel that they lack opportunities to progress in their careers.

With 4% of US respondents and 22% of UK respondents saying they want to leave L&D, it is essential that L&D professionals feel empowered to effectively provide training and support to other employees.

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UK vacancies up 48% year-on-year

The locations with the highest rates of jobseekers have been revealed in a new study. London, Manchester, Birmingham, and towns on London’s commuter belt topped the list. The study results indicate that as offices reopen and daily commuting re-commence, workers are searching for roles closer to home.

The research by job search engine Adzuna also revealed that every advertised London-based job ad received an average of 65 views during April – indicative of high job churn in the capital city and centre of the Great Resignation in the UK.

Second on the list of jobseeker activity was Manchester, with over nine views for every job listing. Birmingham was third at over seven views per ad.

Edinburgh, Scotland, and Cardiff, Wales, also featured on this list, with view rates of 2.5 and 1.83, respectively. Northern Ireland, however, didn’t feature on the list – possibly showing that the Great Resignation has not reached them yet.

Further findings for April 2022 included:

  • Advertised vacancies in the UK were up 48% year-on-year, to 1,298,581.
  • Over half a million vacancies were on offer across London and surrounding areas.
  • The average advertised salary in London and surrounding commutable areas was £45,515.
  • The average advertised UK salary was £36,587 in April. This is 3% lower than 12 months ago (£37,898).
  • The number of advertised vacancies has exceeded the number of job seekers for the first time.

The study also revealed a growing interest in jobs within commuter towns. Slough and Heathrow experienced the fourth-highest jobseeker activity level. While traditionally, workers in these locations would have commuted into London, they are now looking for jobs closer to home. Job ads, on average, received over four views per posting in these areas.

There was also high jobseeker demand in other commuter towns around London:

  • Chelmsford (2.47)
  • Reading (2.45)
  • Guildford and Aldershot (2.07)
  • Luton (1.88)
  • Crawley (1.87)

The commuter belt towns accounted for a fifth of the list of top 30 UK towns and cities with the highest jobseeker activity.

Looking across the UK, England had the highest activity from jobseekers, with an average of 3.6 views per job ad. Rates were much lower across the rest of the UK with Scotland at 0.26, Wales at 0.11 and Northern Ireland at only 0.03.

Paul Lewis, Chief Customer Officer at Adzuna, comments: “London is at the core of the Great Resignation in the UK, but our data reveals the trend is spreading out fast. In particular, jobs in commuter towns are seeing high interest levels driven by a renewed interest from Brits to spend more time at home. As offices have reopened and commutes have restarted, workers are looking for close to home options that will continue to give them the flexibility they got used to over the pandemic and various lockdowns, be that picking the kids up from school, or simply working flexible hours. The return-to-office is a huge driver of the current high movement between jobs, and companies offering fully remote options, or even much publicised ‘work from anywhere’ policies, are stealing a march on the competition and coming out on top.”

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Lack of transparency around salaries hinders women

A recent survey from Glassdoor, the jobs and insights agency, has found that women across the UK are at a disadvantage because of a lack of transparency around salaries. A mere 25% of full-time employees in the UK strongly agree that their employer is transparent about pay with 54% of workers admitting they aren’t comfortable discussing their salary with their boss.

The survey suggests that the lack of discussion around pay is contributing to inequality for women. Sixty-seven percent of female workers didn’t ask for a salary increase in 2020, which equates to 30% more than men. In the last year, 35% of those working in the female-dominated industries of education, healthcare, and hospitality asked for a wage increase compared to 62% of those working in the traditionally male-dominated world of finance and 56% in tech.

According to the results of the survey, women are also 26% less likely than their male counterparts to ask for more money in the next 12 months, with 37% of women planning to ask for a pay rise next year.

The survey revealed that over half (56%) of women admit they lack the confidence to ask for a pay rise and as a result, only 33% of female workers negotiated the salary of their last job offer (compared to 45% of men). Two in five (43%) women revealed that they simply accepted the salary that was offered to them (compared to 35 percent of men).

Nearly three in four of all employees (73 percent) got the wage increase they asked for last year, indicating that women will continue to miss vital opportunities to increase their earning potential.

Jill Cotton, Career Expert at Glassdoor commented: “Workplace transparency is a hallmark of many successful companies and more transparency is needed in the future. One in two women admit to lacking confidence at work – companies should open an honest discussion around salary from the point that the role is advertised and throughout the person’s time with the organisation. Having clear salary bands limits the need for negotiation which, as the Glassdoor research shows, has a detrimental effect on female employees’ ability to earn throughout their career.

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