Category: Employers

Employees’ intent to stay at their jobs decreased by 37% in the last six months

According to The Conference Board, nearly a third of workers report decreased job engagement — the commitment and connection they feel to their work — but the shift to remote work spurred by the pandemic may not be the cause.

The survey found that work location — on-site, remote or a hybrid blend of the two — has no impact on self-reported engagement levels.

However, some people feel decreased engagement more than others. Women, millennials and individual contributors report lower engagement than men, older generations and executives.

A survey conducted by The Conference Board that polled more than 1,600 individuals — predominantly office workers — found that respondents weighed in on workplace culture, work location, compensation and benefits.

Robin Erickson, Ph.D., VP of Human Capital at The Conference Board commented: “Many workers have re-evaluated their priorities since the beginning of 2020 at the outset of COVID-19. Employees are not only demanding to retain the flexibility they gained from being required to work remotely, but they expect genuine and transparent communications to continue from their leaders as well.”

But even with lower levels of self-reported engagement, 82% say their level of effort remains the same or higher.

According to The Conference Board, more workers want to quit, but few have plans of actually doing so. Workers’ intent to stay at their jobs decreased by 37% in the last six months, but only 12% are actively planning to leave. Meanwhile, about 29% of workers are reconsidering their plans to quit due to the imminent recession.

Overall, the survey found that engagement levels decreased for all workers regardless of work location or schedule. However, most respondents report that having a caring, empathetic leader increased in importance to hybrid workers.

Rebecca Ray, Ph.D., Executive Vice President of Human Capital at The Conference Board said: “While these results show that a likely recession may slow some of the high turnovers we’ve been seeing, engagement is eroding for many of those who remain. For businesses to truly thrive, they should focus on improving employee engagement, no matter the employee’s work location or schedule.”

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Half of deskless workers claim that COVID-19 worsened the training provisions

New research amongst HR managers and ‘deskless’ workers, including those in the hospitality, retail, and construction industries, reveals that 86% of HR heads and 69% of employees believe there is room for improvement when it comes to their employer’s approach to training and development.

The research, which was conducted as part of a new report from Cloud Assess, found that HR heads are conscious of the importance of upskilling, with 97% agreeing that training and development is vital to their company’s future success. Those surveyed thought that training can offer a range of benefits to their organisation, including boosting business performance, improving efficiency, and increasing staff retention and satisfaction.

Despite this, businesses continue to underestimate the extent of the current training crisis in vocational industries. Whilst the majority acknowledge that their training programmes could be improved, 85% of HR heads maintain that their company does offer comprehensive training to all employees. A significant proportion of deskless workers disagree. In fact, a third of workers believe their employer’s approach to training is limited or inconsistent.

The challenge has been amplified by the pandemic, with almost half of HR managers and deskless workers claiming that COVID-19 worsened the training provisions available to employees. This couldn’t have come at a worse time, given that the majority of HR managers (80%) and deskless workers (68%) think the need for training and development has increased in the last five years.

In addition, workers’ are increasingly prioritising training when it comes to choosing an employer, with deskless workers ranking upskilling opportunities in the top five most important workplace benefits. Similarly, over two-thirds of deskless workers stated that the training and development opportunities offered by their employer have a strong influence on their loyalty to the business.

The report also explores how workers want the upskilling they are demanding to be delivered. The majority (74%) prefer their training delivered via face-to-face or hybrid (a mixture of face-to-face and online) methods. Online training in isolation was found to be the least popular (12%) amongst staff, demonstrating a clear preference amongst deskless workers for hands-on training sessions which reflect the practical nature of their roles.

Rob Bright, CEO and Founder of Cloud Assess, commented: “Our research confirms what we already suspected. The world of work has changed forever and workers’ priorities have shifted. The real insight is that employers simply can’t afford to cut corners when it comes to training and development. It’s playing an increasingly important role in employee satisfaction and it needs to be delivered in a way that works for them. Plus, with millions of job vacancies across the UK, deskless workers are now in a position to choose a place to work based on these factors.

“It’s crucial that businesses acknowledge the wants and needs of this valuable talent pool and invest in upskilling their workforce effectively, or risk losing out in the fight for talent.”

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Adzuna is calling on all businesses to show salaries in their job ads

New research by Adzuna has revealed the biggest gripes facing jobseekers up and down the country, with half (48%) claiming that no salary or a lack of salary clarity on job ads is their biggest bug bear.

It comes as seven in ten Brits (69%) think employers need to be more transparent on their job ads, with a third (31%) believing salary transparency should be the number one priority on postings – more important than the job role itself (18%), the location (11%) or any work benefit schemes (7%).

Adzuna is calling on all businesses to show salaries in their job ads, are campaigning for the UK government to make including salaries on job ads a legal requirement.

The online jobs platform believes that employers not including salary information on job ads is leading to hours wasted for jobseekers. More than a third (36%) declined a job straight-out after they found out the intended salary, after going through lengthy interview processes. On average, jobseekers wasted six hours applying per position, with the wrong salary with 13% wasting over 10 hours on the process and 3% investing over 20 hours interviewing for the wrong job. In total, Adzuna analysis on job hunting activity over the last five years alone revealed UK workers have wasted over 70 million hours applying for jobs with the wrong salary*. Now, almost half of workers (46%) wouldn’t attend an interview in future if they didn’t know what an employer was willing to offer in terms of salary.

Salary transparency fuelling the gender pay gap 

Whilst the lack of salary transparency is frustrating on a practical level, it’s also hiding a bigger issue by helping perpetuate the gender pay gap. The research revealed that women (33%) are much more likely to find lack of salary transparency an issue when compared to men (21%). There is also a connection between salary transparency and the gender pay gap. A recent analysis by The Times*2 called out companies with the biggest gender pay gaps, including ASOS, EasyJet and Savills, all of which have low levels of salary transparency according to the Adzuna data.

North vs South divide

There also appears to be a regional divide when it comes to salary transparency. Yorkshire and The Humber (63%) is the most open and honest whilst London (55%), Scotland (49%) and Northern Ireland (28%) are at the bottom of the roster. Interestingly, London has been cited in the news as having both the worst ethnicity pay gap and worst gender pay gap which adds fuel to the fire*3.

Industry breakdown

The lack of salary transparency is an industry-wide problem, but certain sectors are faring better than others. Charity and voluntary jobs (88%) are the most transparent, followed by social work (76%) and manufacturing (75%). Creative and design jobs (32%) are the least transparent, while retail jobs (37%), energy jobs (39%) and IT jobs at (43%) also rank amongst the lowest.

Growing appetite for transparency

UK workers are crying out for more transparency in the jobs market. In fact, the lack of salary on a job ad makes potential employees sceptical of an employer. A third (32%) assume the company is hiding something, while a quarter believe it shows the company would underpay them (24%). Others think it makes the company look untrustworthy (22%), unprofessional (21%) or shows them to be biased on how they pay their employees (18%).

A third of Brits (32%) don’t know how much their colleagues are getting paid but four in five (80%) would be open or are neutral to their colleagues knowing how much they earn. Two thirds (63%) think employers making salaries more transparent would make the workplace fairer.

Salary transparency the start of the issue

Salary transparency is just the tip of the iceberg. The worst bug bear is not receiving a reply after applying for a role (32%). Alarmingly, jobseekers have applied on average for seven jobs in the last five years with just three in ten (30%) of those applications leading to an interview. So deep is the issue that four in ten (42%) Brits have wanted to move jobs but decided against it as the process of job hunting is too stressful. On average, this led them to staying in the job for an additional 3.5 years. A tenth (13%) are still in their job as a result.

Adzuna has worked with straight-talking TV personality, Olivia Attwood, who hit the streets to get the nation talking about salary transparency.

Olivia commented: “Let’s be honest (I always am!), job hunting can feel like a nightmare. Whether it’s rubbish job ads with no salary details and unrealistic standards or being ghosted after an interview – there’s a reason I applied to be on reality TV – job hunting wasn’t for me. It’s great that Adzuna is tackling the issue straight-on and campaigning to make salaries on job ads a law. I’m all for more transparency – I even tried to sign the petition twice!”

Doug Monro, Co- Founder & CEO at Adzuna commented: “Our research has confirmed what we have thought for a long-time – jobseekers are fed up with the job application process and the lack of salary transparency on job ads is one of main issues. We’re campaigning to make salary transparency law in the UK and calling on all companies to join our mission. We want employees to know their worth and waste less time on applications, but we also want to bring value to employers who will be able to attract the right candidates. Most importantly, we want to combat the existing gender pay gap and see salary transparency as the start of this important journey.”

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Decision damages the flexibility of the UK labour market

Yesterday, the newly appointed Chancellor, Jeremy Hunt, upended much of the Mini Budget that his predecessor, Kwasi Kwarteng delivered less than a month ago. Hunt announced that he would scrap a planned repeal of the IR35 reforms (off-payroll) which came into effect in April 2021.

In the Mini Budget speech titled ‘The Growth Plan 2022’ that was given in September, Kwarteng delivered on Prime Minister Liz Truss’s promise to review IR35 legislation.

Understandably, this has caused frustration in the off-payroll community following hope of the repeal of legislation that added unnecessary complexities to the contractor workforce and organisations.

Clarke Bowles, Chief Revenue Office at My Digital spoke exclusively to TALiNT International:

“The new Chancellor, Jeremy Hunt has effectively lit a match under the Mini Budget, as a result the off-payroll working rules will remain in place for both the public and private sectors creating a multiverse style glimpse into what could have been. The repeal of the repeal effectively means business as usual as it has been since 2017 for the public sector and 2020 for the private sector whereby the end client has the responsibility to assess and then pass down an SDS (Status Determination Statement) and the fee payer carries the majority of liabilities. Cancelling the Off-Payroll Working Rules repeal seems, dare I say it, like a ‘blanket approach’ to all of Kwasi’s Mini Budget points and this one in particular won’t help the growth of the economy which relies heavily on flexible workers in the UK labour market, the repeal had the potential to serve as a catalyst to economic growth it’s unfortunate that we came so close to this being a reality but are unfortunately left with a piece of legislation which was never really fit for purpose. Whilst IR35 is incredibly complex I will continue to advise that accurate and fair assessments are and always have been the way forward, ensuring those who are genuinely outside of IR35 can continue to work in that manner.”

IR35 specialist, Qdos, also responded to the news. Qdos CEO, Seb Maley, said: “I’m lost for words. The chaos, uncertainty and disruption caused by the mini-Budget is unprecedented. While U-turning on some tax cuts made sense, cancelling the repeal of IR35 reform is the wrong decision at the wrong time. It’s a knee-jerk reaction from the government and, in my opinion, won’t benefit the economy. IR35 reform damages the flexibility of the UK labour market, which is key to economic growth. Many contractors left the sector after risk-averse businesses stopped engaging them. Repealing reform would have opened the floodgates – a catalyst for the recovery of this sector.

“With IR35 reform now remaining in play, businesses must continue prioritising compliance. The legislation is complex and navigating it can be a challenge, but with the right approach can, in fact, be managed.”

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Delays in candidate screening are threatening TA

According to research from Access Recruitment  present delays to candidate screening are threatening talent acquisition in most UK businesses with more than eight in ten (83%) employers losing out on top talent due to the time taken to complete pre-employment screening checks.

In today’s tight candidate market, recruiters cannot afford to experience such delays. Governmental processing bottlenecks are affecting background screening for 61% of UK companies, directly prolonging organisations’ time to hire.

Businesses are increasingly introducing automated screening, especially for Right to Work (RTW) checks. In October 2022, the Home Office made digital RTW processing a permanent fixture, introducing certified Identification Document Verification Technology (IDVT) for continued worker identification checks without the need to meet in person.

Flaws within current manual screening processes affect employers and candidates alike. Employers suffer delays in accessing the talent they desperately need, and candidates are stalled in commencing their employment.

James Waby, Pre-Screening Consultant at Access Recruitment spoke exclusively to TALiNT International:“According to our new data, almost half (49%) of agency and inhouse respondents are already utilising candidate screening technology. This is promising, but there is work to be done to ensure that more companies understand how to embrace technology to automate their pre-employment screening processes for better efficiency and compliance. Moving forward, organisations have so many opportunities to move away from manual processes to help them onboard workers faster, particularly amid the challenging economic environment and talent shortages.”

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Winners will be announced at TALINT Partners’ two-day Talent and TIARAS event in November

TALiNT Partners have announced the finalists for the 2022 TIARA Talent Acquisition Awards US. These awards, which set the standard for excellence, innovation and achievement, enable employers to showcase the incredible work they do in talent acquisition and resourcing.

Ken Brotherston, TALiNT Partners CEO commented: “The last year has seen an ever-growing range of challenges for talent acquisition and resourcing teams so it is a pleasure to be able to recognize and celebrate the amazing work being done by all of our finalists. The TIARAs are distinguished by the rigour of its judging process and the quality of its judging panel. Entries will be assessed across key areas including DE&I, innovation and organizational impact.

Shortlisted entries will be scored by a highly experienced, independent panel of expert judges drawn from the HR and Talent Acquisition community. The 2022 judging panel can be viewed here.

Judges will convene later this month to decide who will triumph in each category, as well as to crown the overall winner – the Overall Achievement in TA Award. All winners will be announced at the Awards Ceremony taking place on December 1 at the Atlanta Marriott Marquis, as part of its two-day Talent and Tiaras event.

Winners will be profiled in a special supplement published with TALiNT International. The full list of TIARA 2022 Talent Acquisition US Finalists can be viewed here.

The 2022 awards campaign is supported by Allegis Global Solutions, AMS, JoinedUp, Magnit, Omni Inclusive, Ph.Creative, Relode and WorkLLama.

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86% of HR heads and 69% of employees believe L&D can be improved

New research by Cloud Assess, found that amongst HR managers and ‘deskless’ workers, including those in the hospitality, retail, and construction industries, 86% of HR heads and 69% of employees believe there is room for improvement when it comes to their employer’s approach to training and development.

According to findings, HR heads are conscious of the importance of upskilling, with 97% agreeing that training and development is vital to their company’s future success. Those surveyed revealed that training can offer a range of benefits to their organisation, including boosting business performance, improving efficiency, and increasing staff retention and satisfaction.

Despite this, businesses continue to underestimate the extent of the current training crisis in vocational industries. Whilst the majority acknowledge that their training programmes could be improved, 85% of HR heads maintain that their company does offer comprehensive training to all employees. A significant proportion of deskless workers disagree. In fact, a third of workers believe their employer’s approach to training is limited or inconsistent.

The challenge has been amplified by the pandemic, with almost half of HR managers and deskless workers claiming that COVID-19 worsened the training provisions available to employees. This couldn’t have come at a worse time, given that the majority of HR managers (80%) and deskless workers (68%) think the need for training and development has increased in the last five years.

In addition, workers are increasingly prioritising training when it comes to choosing an employer, with deskless workers ranking upskilling opportunities in the top five most important workplace benefits. Similarly, over two-thirds of deskless workers stated that the training and development opportunities offered by their employer have a strong influence on their loyalty to the business.

The report also explores how workers want the upskilling they are demanding to be delivered. The majority (74%) prefer their training delivered via face-to-face or hybrid (a mixture of face-to-face and online) methods. Online training in isolation was found to be the least popular (12%) amongst staff, demonstrating a clear preference amongst deskless workers for hands-on training sessions which reflect the practical nature of their roles.

Rob Bright, CEO and Founder of Cloud Assess, commented: “Our research confirms what we already suspected. The world of work has changed forever and workers’ priorities have shifted. The real insight is that employers simply can’t afford to cut corners when it comes to training and development. It’s playing an increasingly important role in employee satisfaction and it needs to be delivered in a way that works for them. Plus, with millions of job vacancies across the UK, deskless workers are now in a position to choose a place to work based on these factors.

“It’s crucial that businesses acknowledge the wants and needs of this valuable talent pool and invest in upskilling their workforce effectively, or risk losing out in the fight for talent.”

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Leadership teams should be trained to manage a new remote workforce

According to a report by TechCrunch, monitoring employees by webcam is violation of human rights; this following Chetu, a Florida-based telemarketer, demanded a worker in the Netherlands turn on his webcam for nine hours per day and fired him when he refused, but a Dutch court later ruled against the firm.

The Dutch court’s ruling suggested the required use of webcams to monitor workers violates human rights. In court documents cited in the report, the worker said he felt the requirement was an invasion of privacy and suggested the company was already able to monitor all activities on his laptop and he was sharing his screen.

Debbie Walton, Editor at TALiNT Partners commented: “Considering the sharp focus that is on employee wellbeing, with burnout rife since work/ home lines are blurred with remote working, the micromanagement of staff won’t do much to retain valuable staff. Employers should ensure that their leadership teams are supported and trained where managing a remote workforce is in question.”

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Will this mean that more gig workers will be considered employees?

The US Department of Labor will be moving forward with a new rule aimed at determining who is an employee and who is an independent contractor with the department announced today that it will publish a notice of proposed rulemaking on Thursday.

Its new rule will likely require more workers — including gig economy drivers — to be classified as employees rather than independent contractors, The New York Times reported.

Marty Walsh, Secretary of Labor commented: “While independent contractors have an important role in our economy, we have seen in many cases that employers misclassify their employees as independent contractors, particularly among our nation’s most vulnerable workers. Misclassification deprives workers of their federal labor protections, including their right to be paid their full, legally earned wages.”

Specifically, the proposed rule would:

  • Align the department’s approach with courts’ Fair Labor Standards Act interpretation and the economic reality test.
  • Restore the multifactor, totality-of-the-circumstances analysis to determine whether a worker is an employee or an independent contractor under the FLSA.
  • Ensure that all factors are analyzed without assigning a predetermined weight to a particular factor or set of factors.
  • Revert to the longstanding interpretation of the economic reality factors. These factors include the investment, control and opportunity for profit or loss factors. The integral factor, which considers whether the work is integral to the employer’s business, is also included.
  • Assist with the proper classification of employees and independent contractors under the FLSA.
  • Rescind the Trump era 2021 independent contractor rule.

The current Trump-era independent contractor final rule was set to go into effect in March 2021 but was initially delayed by the incoming Biden administration and was withdrawn by the Department of Labor in May 2021. However, a federal court held the withdrawal was unlawful, and the rule remains in place.

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Search trend ‘hybrid working’ saw an increase of +250% in the past 12 months

A new study by live answering service, VoiceNation, has created a map of Europe, which shows the countries that prefer remote working, versus those that don’t.

Since the pandemic, remote working has become the new norm with very little sign of returning to full time, in-person working. And with the search trend ‘hybrid working’ seeing an increase of +250% in the past 12 months and over 822k remote jobs on LinkedIn, it is clear people are still very much interested in flexible working models.

But which countries are more in favour of remote working?

The study looked at positive and negative sentiments through Linkfluence.com, revealing which European countries are the most avid fans of remote working, and which aren’t.

Love WFH Love working in the office 
Austria Albania
Belgium Bosnia & Herzegovina
Bulgaria Germany
Chechia Greece
Croatia Italy
Denmark Russia
Estonia United Kingdom
Finland
France
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Latvia
Lithuania
Malta
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Ukraine

The countries that love remote working the most 

Renowned for its great working environment, Iceland tops the list as the best country in Europe for remote working. Here, your working hours do not take up too much of your day, allowing you to spend time outside of work doing things you love and spending more time with family. Iceland already had a 4-day working week in place before the Covid-19 pandemic hit!

The other Nordic countries, including Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland all had positive segments on remote working, and as they’re known for their great benefits and policies, it might be a perfect place to relocate if you’re interested in remote working while seeing new parts of the world!

With its strict COVID-19 regulations and lockdowns, France had to adjust itself to remote working, and it seems it’s there to stay. The people of France have come to terms with remote working after the pandemic and seem to prefer this way of working rather than working in the office every day.

In the Netherlands, remote working is a legal right by law, where your employer must review your request to work from home should you bring it up, so there’s nothing holding you back from working in a cute café tucked into a side street and exploring the many museums and other activities the Netherlands has to offer after working hours!

The countries that prefer working in an office

Some countries which preferred working in the office were Germany, Greece, and Italy. Here, it seems most workers liked the office environment, and preferred this to working from home. This could be due to a multitude of reasons, like socialising with your colleagues, getting out of the house and be out on the move every day.

Another country which had more negative sentiment than positive, was the UK. Lockdown forced many to work from home during the pandemic, but now that things have opened again, employees and employers alike are looking forward to getting back into the office, it seems.

There is no right or wrong opinion about remote working. Since it’s here to stay, more people will be able to find the set-up that is right for them, whether it’s going into the office often, or working from the comfort of their home.

Commenting on the study, a spokesperson at VoiceNation said, “We have most definitely seen a shift regarding working from home. The younger generations seem to prefer WFH, while older generations who are used to going in five days a week miss the office. Regardless of what you prefer, we hope our study can help people looking to perhaps relocate, or simply understand more about remote working!”

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