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85% are more likely to apply for jobs that disclose that information

According to a survey by ResumeBuilder.com, a majority of workers would demand to know the salary ranges for their jobs, with 88% saying they would demand to know the salary range if allowed under new salary transparency laws being enacted in some states.

The survey also found that 85% of workers said they are more likely to apply to job ads that list salary ranges. However, workers were split when it comes to what companies should be allowed when listing salary ranges. More than half, 58%, said companies should be able to list any salary range, no matter how wide, while 42% said salary ranges should have limits.

Stacie Haller, Career Counselor and Executive Recruiter at ResumeBuilder.com commented: “While applicants tend to favor companies that provide salary ranges in their job descriptions, displaying a very wide salary range does not help anyone. Companies that provide realistic and reasonable salary ranges can build trust with potential employees and attract more qualified candidates.”

Overall, 92% percent of American workers support salary transparency laws, according to the survey. Of supporters, 61% believe these laws will improve wage gaps, 58% believe they will make it easier for job applicants and 47% say they will boost transparency. However, 63% of respondents fear it will be problematic to know how much money their co-workers make.

The survey included 1,200 workers and was conducted online on Nov. 2.

 

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Year over year, job openings are down 6.9%.

According to seasonally adjusted data released by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of US job openings fell 3.3% in October to 10.3 million. Year over year, job openings are down 6.9%.

However, Reuters noted that job openings remained significantly high in October, which points to continued labor market resilience despite the Federal Reserve’s efforts to cool demand by aggressively raising interest rates and were in line with economists’ expectations.

Hires were down 1.4% in October from September and fell 6.9% year over year. The number of separations, which includes quits, layoffs and discharges, rose 0.3% month over month.

Quits, which are included in separations and are voluntarily initiated by employees, fell by a scant 0.8% in October compared to September. Layoffs and discharges, which come under involuntary separations, rose 4.4% in October from September.

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Mexican labor reform decreases agency work volume of business by 80%

The regulatory outlook for the staffing industry remains negative for the next six months in 13 countries, according to the World Employment Confederation’s recently released Staffing Executive Regulatory Outlook report. The impact changes in regulation are expected to be neutral in seven countries and positive in four.

Overall, the staffing industry anticipates regulatory changes to have a positive impact in the Netherlands, Spain, UK and Italy.

The report noted following the Mexican labor reform implemented in September 2021, agency work is no longer allowed in Mexico, decreasing the volume of business by 80% compared to the situation before the reform. However, agency work can continue operating in “specialized services” falling outside the core activity of the user company.

In Europe, the expected negative regulatory changes include:

  • A new regulation on the maximum length of an assignment in Sweden.
  • A new regulation on statutory sick pay and pensions in Ireland.
  • Discussions and possible regulation on the overall protection of agency workers covered by collective labor agreements in Germany, linked to the EU Court of Justice proceeding.
  • Discussions on the use of agency work in the healthcare sector in both Denmark and France.
  • A new law entering into force in Norway on maximum length of assignment and a regional ban in the construction sector.

The biannual poll includes responses from executives of 24 different national staffing federations. It was conducted in October.

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Tech and Telecoms challenged by migrations, inflation, and cost of labor

The ManpowerGroup Talent Solutions 2022 Total Workforce Index™ (TWI) has revealed the U.S., Singapore, and Canada as the highest-ranking labor markets across the globe for sourcing, hiring, and retaining talent. The ninth annual TWI report has analyzed more than 200 factors to evaluate skills availability, cost efficiency, regulation, and productivity. These findings were combined with big data and expert analysis to assess the workforce engagement of 69 global markets.

The current labor markets are characterized by intense competition for skilled workers, with 75% of companies globally reporting talent shortages and difficulty hiring — a 16-year high according to ManpowerGroup’s 2022 Talent Shortage Survey. This year’s revamped TWI places more emphasis on the impacts of remote work, the growing willingness and flexibility of employers to scale back education requirements and choosing to skill candidates on the job.

The ages of the workforce

There’s also heavier focus on the age of the workforce. As older workers leave the labor market, more companies are cultivating sustainable populations of talent by prioritizing the availability of large pools of Gen Z and millennial workers. Additionally, cost-of-living indices, wage inflation rates, and exchange rate volatility are new factors introduced into the TWI based on the significant impact of these issues on organizations and their workforces. This helps to provide a clearer picture of economic stability as companies make workforce mix and location decisions.

Dave McGonegal, Vice President of Talent Solutions Consulting & Advisory commented: “In a digital-first global economy, skilled talent is the new currency for business and economic growth. Organizations looking to separate from the pack turn to the Index to help them navigate change in real-time. This includes navigating new markets that will enable companies to compete for much-needed talent proactively and creatively, while still meeting business objectives. Companies need to become employers of choice, regardless of location, and factor in the needs most important to employees.”

When it comes to Technology and Telecommunications, organizations have been challenged by migrations, inflation, and cost of labor. This is causing them to heavily weigh a range of factors that contribute to long-term sustainability, productivity, and cost efficiency. In heavily regulated industries such as Pharmaceutical, Biotech, and Medical Device Manufacturing companies are finding challenges with cost efficiency and talent availability as specialized skill sets, certifications, and background checks are required for producing medical devices.

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Amazon joins big tech companies in staff cuts

EmployBridge, the largest industrial staffing firm based on US revenue, is laying off 171 employees across the US, according to a Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification, or WARN notice, filed with the Georgia Department of Labor. Amazon is also reportedly laying off personnel, while Twitter is adding to its previously reported staff cuts.

Citing according to a source familiar with the EmployBridge layoffs, the Atlanta Business Chronicle reported that the affected employees are a mix of full-time and part-time workers who have back-office support roles such as in information technology support, accounting or human resources.

EmployBridge this month announced it completed its acquisition of Bluecrew, a Chicago-based online provider of industrial workers on a W-2 basis. Atlanta-based EmployBridge places more than 450,000 temporary associates annually via 446 offices in 48 states. It was acquired by Apollo Global Management Inc. in 2021.

Amazon this week also began cutting jobs across the company. Managers have begun informing employees that they have two months to find another role inside the company or accept severance, according to media reports.

TechCrunch reported that the company allegedly plans to lay off 10,000 – comprising roughly 3% of its corporate workforce. The figure would mark the largest “workforce reduction” ever undertaken by the e-commerce and cloud computing giant in its nearly 30-year history.

And Twitter has laid off 4,400 of its 5,500 contractors, CNBC reported. The move follows the layoffs of approximately half of its internal staff. According to a report from Quartz, counting Twitter and Amazon, major tech companies will have laid off 33,000 workers over the last month.

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A third of workers plan to look new roles in 2023

According to iCIMS’ “2023 Workforce Report”, one in three workers are planning to look for a new job in 2023, this amid business disruption and new outlooks on work. However, the Report found that another third of workers plan to stick with their current roles and take on more hours and responsibilities.

Meanwhile, three out of four business leaders feel retaining talent in 2023 will be a bigger challenge than hiring talent.

In terms of remote work, nearly 60% of people believe they are more likely to get training or learning opportunities in an in-person environment. Meanwhile, 41% of women and 32% of men feel they will unlikely get promoted if they work remotely.

The Report revealed that training remains a priority for a majority of workers (78%) when making career decisions. Non-traditional work perks, such as gym memberships, play a role in the decision to accept a job offer for just 16% of respondents.

Additionally, 60% of workers rank their company’s DE&I initiatives as effective. However, most respondents feel these practices are missing at their workplace, such as pronoun usage, celebrations of different cultures, unconscious bias training or allyship programmes.

The survey includes responses from job seekers, HR and business leaders. The report also contains market data from iCIMS’ recruitment platform.

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Microsoft, Salesforce, Meta and Twitter make mass staff cuts

Big names in Big Tech are letting go of staff at what is said to be the most dramatic cull in tech sector history. Meta has laid off more than 11,000 employees thereby reducing its headcount by around 13 percent, while Microsoft announced at the end of October that it’s laying off around 1,000, with numbers still to be confirmed. Elon Musk led the charge, however, by laying off around half of its workforce when he took control of the social media platform on October 27. This, in a bid to run a financially healthier business by taking it private and enhancing his unilateral power as CEO.

Salesforce has joined the avalanche with an announcement of 2,500 redundancies in the US, with the jury still out on whether or not the mass layoffs will reach UK shores.

Meta, the social media giant, is battling falling revenues and rising competition despite reporting profits in excess of £23 billion. Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg emailed employees on Wednesday morning informing them of the redundancies.

He said: “I want to take accountability for these decisions and for how we got here. I know this is tough for everyone, and I’m especially sorry to those impacted.” Zuckerberg said revenue growth experienced during the pandemic had not been sustained, ad performance was down, and ecommerce had declined, all in an environment of economic downturn.

He added: “[These factors] caused our revenue to be much lower than I’d expected. I got this wrong, and I take responsibility for that.” Despite drops in share prices and apprehension around Zuckerburg’s Metaverse development, he has said that investment in Real Labs will continue.

Why? the industry is asking. Since the pandemic, the tech industry has seen an explosion of use of and investment in tech, probably since Facebook’s arrival 18 years ago. The result of rising inflation and reduced revenue seem to be the main reasons for the slew of mass redundancies, even in the face of reporting massive revenue over the last year.

Ken Brotherston, TALiNT Partners CEO said: “First of all, it’s only the most dramatic cull in tech history if you’re under 40. The dot com reverse was quicker and deeper in percentage terms but, of course, that isn’t any comfort if you are one of the people affected. What might offer some succour however is that we still have a pretty robust employment market with a lot of the skills previously valued by these big tech firms still in high demand from lots of other employers.”

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LinkedIn issued a cease-and-desist letter to hiQ in 2017

LinkedIn has announced a win in a six-year lawsuit against hiQ Labs Inc., a now dormant company that had scraped LinkedIn data.

hiQ, which was founded in 2012, went dormant by 2019 after being unable to find further investors and the loss of major clients, according to court records.

hiQ’s products included “Keeper,” designed to analyze and predict the retention risks for the employees of a given employer and indicate which employees were at greatest risk of being recruited away, according to court documents. hiQ’s other product, “Skill Mapper,” aggregated and summarized the skills possessed by an employer’s workforce by analyzing all of the skills employees listed in their LinkedIn profiles, including from previous roles.

In its operations, hiQ attempted to reverse engineer LinkedIn’s systems to avoid detection by simulating human site-access behaviors, according to court documents. hiQ also hired independent contractors known as “turkers” to conduct quality assurance while logged in to LinkedIn by viewing and confirming hiQ customers’ employees’ identities manually. When LinkedIn’s defenses restricted the turkers’ real accounts, hiQ instructed them to create fake ones.

LinkedIn issued a cease-and-desist letter to hiQ in 2017.

Sara Wight, VP, Legal-litigation, Competition and Enforcement at LinkedIn, wrote in a post. “The court ruled that LinkedIn’s user agreement unambiguously prohibits scraping and the unauthorized use of scraped data as well as fake accounts, affirming LinkedIn’s legal positions against hiQ for the past six years. The court also found that hiQ knew for years that its actions violated our user agreement, and that LinkedIn is entitled to move forward with its claim that hiQ violated the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.”

 

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The redundancies equate to 13% of Meta’s headcount

Meta has laid off more than 11,000 employees thereby reducing its headcount by around 13 percent, in the most dramatic cull in its history. The social media giant is battling falling revenues and rising competition. Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg emailed employees on Wednesday morning informing them of the redundancies.

He said: “I want to take accountability for these decisions and for how we got here. I know this is tough for everyone, and I’m especially sorry to those impacted.” Zuckerberg said revenue growth experienced during the pandemic had not been sustained, ad performance was down, and ecommerce had declined, all in an environment of economic downturn.

He added: “[These factors] caused our revenue to be much lower than I’d expected. I got this wrong, and I take responsibility for that.”

Michael McCartney, Employment Partner at Fladgate commented: “Meta’s announcement that it plans to make significant job cuts in response to the current macro-economic environment comes very soon after similar cuts were imposed by Elon Musk following his purchase of Twitter, demonstrating that there is a real impact on advertising revenues in the social media sphere. It would be surprising if either company adopted the approach P&O Ferries deployed recently when it sacked 800 seafarer without prior warning. This is because UK employment law requires an employer to consult with elected representatives (or Trade Unions if there are any recognised) for a minimum period of 30 days, where it envisages 20 or more redundancies and, for at least 45 days, if that number exceeds 100 redundancies. The company is also required to send a notice called an HR1 form to the UK government and if it fails to do this, its directors run the risk of criminal liabilities.

Social media firms (even more so than a travel company) are bound to be conscious of the negative publicity for any failure to comply with employment laws even if the financial penalty (which amounts to 13 weeks’ pay per employee) alone is not enough of a disincentive.”

Florence Brocklesby, Founder of Employment Law Specialists Bellevue Law also commented: “Redundancies are, sadly, a fact of life, and delivering difficult news is never easy. But how a restructuring is conducted is hugely important, not only for those leaving the business, but also for those who remain and the company’s wider reputation. Good processes combined with humanity are key to navigating a challenging time safely and with dignity.

“Twitter’s handling of its current restructuring has shone a light on how redundancies in the tech sector should – and should not – be handled. Just a few days ago Twitter announced plans to let go of 50% of its staff, with swathes of employees finding themselves suddenly locked out of company systems. Meta needs to avoid making those same mistakes today.”

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25% of employees have received employer assistance, outside of annual salary increases


New research
from Randstad has revealed that workers want more support from employers to help them manage the growing cost of living crisis.

The research, which surveyed 7,000 people across five markets* showed that the strongest pressure is coming from the younger generations with the majority (57%) of Gen Z and Millennials placing responsibility for ensuring that they can afford increasing costs with government or employers, compared to only 44% of Baby Boomers.

Sentiment differs across continents, as three in five (60%) Germans and around half of British (53%) and Dutch (46%) workers placed primary responsibility on government, while only a fifth (21%) of Americans agreed. US workers were more likely to pinpoint their employers as the ones who should take action, with a fifth (21%) choosing them, compared to less than one in ten (9%) of Brits and Australians and only 5% of Germans.

Growing expectations of businesses

Only a quarter (25%) of employees have so far received employer assistance, outside of annual salary increases, but most workers say they want to see more action from their employers in the next six months. Close to half (45%) want a monthly cost of living pay boost, with other demands on employers including:

  • Over half (52%) wanting their employer to increase their salaries outside of the regular cadence of pay reviews
  • Nearly a third (30%) wanting subsidies for daily expenses like cost of energy or travel
  • Over a quarter (27%) wanting a one-off cost of living payment

Younger workers have the highest expectations

The level of employee expectation also differs by generation, with younger workers wanting the most help. Half (49%) of baby boomers said they themselves were responsible for managing the increasing cost of living, compared to just a third (33%) of under-35s.

These generational differences are also reflected in the fact that two thirds (67%) of Gen Z workers have received or expect to receive additional assistance from their employer to help them through the cost of living crisis, compared to only a quarter (24%) of baby boomers who said the same.

Employers are beginning to make this a priority

There are some signs of employers beginning to help workers manage the current economic climate. One in ten workers (9%) have received a one-off cost of living payment and 8% are receiving monthly cost of living pay boosts. This is more common in Germany, where 14% of workers have received this assistance, compared to only 7% of Americans.

Sander van ‘t Noordende, CEO of Randstad, said: “As talent shortages continue across many industries around the globe, employees are now facing a fresh challenge of the increasing cost of living. Against this backdrop, workers are looking to employers to offer the complete package – flexible, inclusive and financially stable employment. While the economic environment may encourage people to stick with their employer, causing a slowdown in the “Great Rotation” businesses mustn’t miss out on the unique opportunity to create a more content and productive workforce. Those who feel supported now, are likely to remain loyal even when times aren’t as tough.”

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Talent Solutions

Acquisition strengthens Nash Squared as a major MSP

Nash Squared, a provider of talent and technology solutions, has become a major force in Managed Service Provision with its recent acquisition of Het Flexhuis – a Managed Service Provider (MSP) of talent and recruitment services based in The Netherlands.

Het Flexhuis has a strong track record in delivering outsourced recruitment services for government, public services, and commercial organisations and will operate as an independent brand within Nash Squared’s recruitment business Harvey Nash.

Bev White, CEO of Nash Squared, commented: “I am delighted to welcome Het Flexhuis into the Nash Squared family. It is our vision to help our clients access talent and technology in every way possible, and offering a high quality MSP solution is an important next step for us. Het Flexhuis brings enormous experience and expertise with them, and I am excited by the potential.”

Occo Lijding, MD of Harvey Nash The Netherlands, commented: “This represents a step change in how we can help and support our clients in talent and technology. I have long admired the team at Het Flexhuis, and when we met I was struck by how similar our values and ambitions were. They are the perfect fit for us, and I look forward to working with them.”

Frederieke Schmidt Crans, Managing Director, Het Flexhuis commented: “We are thrilled and excited to become part of Nash Squared. Our company was established ten years ago with a mission to create a world-class MSP with great people and processes at its core. We see joining Nash Squared as the natural next chapter in that success story.”

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Search engines combine forces to accelerate Adzuna’s growth in the US

On Tuesday, 14 June, Adzuna announced their acquisition of the US job search engine Getwork.

The Getwork team, under the leadership of Brad Squibb, will be working alongside the Adzuna team, intending to accelerate Adzuna’s growth in North America.

Getwork links job seekers with vacant roles at North American companies by indexing millions of verified jobs daily directly from tens of thousands of employer career sites.

Adzuna, with headquarters in London, UK, Indianapolis, IN, and Sydney, AU, uses AI-powered technology to match people to jobs. The company has recently launched in Switzerland, Belgium, Spain, and Mexico. Their operations now cover 20 markets globally.

The two companies will operate as independent brands with their own established communities.

Doug Monro, CEO, and Co-founder of Adzuna, comments: “Adzuna acquiring Getwork will help us supercharge our growth in North America. The Getwork team’s stellar reputation for great service and delivery has led them to be trusted by an impressive roster of household name companies in the US. It’s also a great fit as their team and mission are so aligned with ours. The US enterprise market is crying out for strong alternatives to existing offerings and we’re looking forward to combining Adzuna’s marketing expertise, global footprint and programmatic job matching technology with Getwork’s deep industry knowledge and reputation to deliver even better for our customers. The US is the fastest-growing part of our business and this acquisition will accelerate our profitable growth trajectory.”

Brad Squibb, President of Getwork, comments: “Adzuna is a truly global business, operating across 20 countries, which creates an exciting opportunity for us to scale into new markets with the help of a brand that has already paved the way for international expansion. We can’t wait to join Doug and the team on this journey.”

 

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Despite efforts there is still massive room for improvement in UK management and reporting

In research released today, findings reveal a lack of focus on progressing diversity in the workplace. In the study conducted by SD Worx, it was found that while 68% of UK companies are committed to removing unconscious bias in the recruitment process, many have failed to implement a reporting system to track progress on meeting ED&I objectives.

The survey revealed that only 26% of UK companies evaluate managerial commitment to achieving ED&I-related objectives. A further 32% admitted having no systems allowing employees to report discrimination.

The UK ranked third in its commitment to removing unconscious bias at 68% when it comes to ranking. Ireland ranked first at 74%, with Belgium coming in second, at 69%.

As far as rankings for equal access to training, the UK is slightly lower than other countries, with 64% of companies investing in equal access to training and development. Ireland (72%), Belgium (71%), and Poland (69%) topped the list.

While 64% of UK companies include transparency about ED&I goals and actions to attract a diverse workforce in their mission statement and corporate values, only 60% of the UK companies surveyed said that they promote ED&I in job advertisements, social media, and their websites.

The survey also revealed that countries vary in their level of focus concerning educating and involving managers in their ED&I policies. For example, in the UK, 60% of companies stated that they actively involve their managers in ED&I policies, and 60% provide internal training on the topic.

Colette Philp, UK HR Country Lead at SD Worx commented: “It’s no longer enough for businesses to say they prioritise diversity and inclusion. Instead, they must prove their commitment to achieving a more diverse workforce, both internally within their business and externally to attract talent.”

“There is more awareness than ever before regarding diversity in the workplace and it’s a deciding factor for many when it comes to searching for a role or staying with a business. A diverse workforce brings new experiences and perspectives and an inclusive environment allows individuals to thrive. If businesses aren’t already putting ED&I as a top priority, it’s essential they act now to do so.”

Jurgen Dejonghe, Portfolio Manager SD Worx Insights, added: “It’s important that companies start investing in an active reporting system about their actions concerning diversity, equality and inclusion. On the one hand, that data offers a strong basis for optimising the diversity policy with concrete and consciously controlled actions. On the other hand, such a system also provides clear evidence whether companies are effectively putting their money where their mouth is and not making false promises to (future) employees.”

For ED&I initiatives to be successful, change needs to come from the top, with proper rollouts and reporting system to track their progress.

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TALiNT Partners has announced the finalists for the 2022 TIARA Talent Solutions Awards with 22 of the United States’ best Talent Solutions, MSP & RPO firms shortlisted across eight award categories.

The finalists for the 2022 Talent Solutions Awards US, which spotlight MSP, RPO and Talent Solutions providers delivering excellence in recruitment and talent acquisition across the US, are the top of the crop and represent the very best in providers in the industry.

Ken Brotherston, Chief Executive of TALiNT Partners made comment: “Following the inaugural TIARA Talent Solutions Awards US last year, I am delighted to see many of our 2021 finalists return to celebrate their achievements, as well as a number of new entrants this year. The 2022 Awards are a true celebration across the market, from the large global players to newer entrants and niche RPO organizations, all demonstrating excellence in their impact for employers and their own employees.”

“The TIARAs are distinguished by the rigor of its judging process and the quality of its judging panel,” he added. “Entries will be assessed by our esteemed judges through six key metrics: excellence in delivery; innovation; DE&I impact; sustainable value; business growth; and purpose.”

What sets the TIARAs apart from other awards programs is their independent panel of expert judges and individual feedback given back to each finalist.

The judges for this year’s TIARA Talent Solutions Awards are drawn from the HR and Talent Acquisition community are:

  • Sachin Jain, Senior Director – Global Talent Management, PepsiCo
  • Andrew Brown, Director RPO and Recruiting, Cornerstone
  • Russell Griffiths, General Manager, Coleman Research
  • Rich Genovese, Global Head – Talent Identification & Discovery, Jazz Pharmaceuticals
  • Gregg Schneider, Senior Manager – Procurement Plus, Global Talent Marketplace and Innovation Lead, Accenture
  • Justin Brown, Talent Acquisition Project Manager, Gallagher
  • Chris Farmer, Global Program Owner, Salesforce
  • Kerri Arman, Former VP Global Head of Talent, American Express Global Business Travel
  • Saleem Khaja, COO and Co-Founder, WorkLLama
  • Fitzgerald Ventura, CEO, 1099Policy
  • Mike Wilczak, Chief Product Officer, iCIMS

Judges will convene in May to debate and decide the winner of each category Award as well as an overall Talent Solutions Provider of the Year. All winners will be announced at an exclusive virtual awards ceremony on Thursday June 9th, 18:00 EDT.

Winners will also be profiled in a special TIARA Awards supplement published with TALiNT International.

The TIARA 2022 campaign is supported by our headline partner Cornerstone, and sponsored by WorkLLama, 1099Policy, and iCIMS.

The full list of TIARA 2022 Talent Solutions Finalists can be viewed here.

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