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90% of executives say skills are becoming the way their organizations are “defining work”

According to a recent report published by Deloitte, organizations that use skills-based practices, such as career mapping for skill sets and hiring that focuses on ability instead of degrees, outperform their peers that don’t do so. However, many organizations are struggling to make significant changes amid calls for workplace agility, Deloitte noted in its report.

Some of the changes mentioned in the report extend to the function of the job itself; with 60% of executives surveyed saying that “fractionalized work,” or work that allows workers to flow between tasks based on their skills or interests, would create better value for an organization. And a number of workers said that “broadened work,” or work that is structured around broad problems to be solved, would be the best way to organize work.

While almost 90% of executives surveyed reported that skills are becoming the way their organizations are “defining work, deploying talent, managing careers and valuing employees” — and 90% of organizations said they are “actively experimenting” with skills-based programming — 59% of workers surveyed said their organizations still value degrees and job experience over “demonstrated skills and potential.”

There was however a disconnect noted by various organizations, even as President Joe Biden made public calls for workers to consider “skills not degrees.”

According to a Cengage report from July, a majority of employers surveyed still require degrees for entry-level jobs, due in part to questions over the value of credentials and other nondegree signals of skill. But many recognized that removing that requirement would help them find workers.

Similarly, 72% of employers in Morning Consult survey data released in August reported that they didn’t see degrees as reliable signals for candidates possessing the right skills, but just over half admitted they still hired from degree programs because it felt less risky. Young workers are also wary of the risk; only 31% surveyed said nondegree programs were a better long-term investment than a degree, and 65% were worried about choosing the wrong path altogether.

Surveyed employers who have pushed for skills-first programming noted that it required a complete rebuild of their job descriptions and positions. But by doing so it helped them remove barriers to significant sources of talent, one organization said during a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs virtual event in July.

As agility once again comes into focus with employers entering the post-pandemic era, skills will likely remain a top priority for organizations, Deloitte’s report noted.

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The Bill deleted the section that allows employees to choose their own payroll payment cycle

According to reports, the New Jersey Staffing Alliance called on New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy to conditionally veto temp worker rights legislation in order to fix flaws in the legislation. The group argued the law, S. 511, could force closure of staffing firms and cause job losses for temporary workers.

On Tuesday, the alliance issued a press release calling for the governor to conditionally veto the bill. It said the conditional veto is the last opportunity to make changes to the bill.

The New Jersey Staffing Alliance released statement: “The Temp Workers Bill of Rights addresses numerous very important issues that will improve the work environment for temp workers, but it contains several problematic areas for which we have advocated changes and have been ignored. The bill in its current form could tip some staffing agencies, particularly smaller ones, to shut their doors, which could cause drastic reductions in the 500,000 temporary employees New Jersey staffing firms supply to every industry and job category in the state [and that generate] almost $6 billion dollars in the state’s economy.”

In August, the New Jersey Senate approved the bill, giving the governor 45 days to sign it, veto it or issue a conditional veto.

Four amendments to the bill were requested by the New Jersey Staffing Alliance:

  1. Delete the section of the bill that requires temporary staffing firms to pay wages and equivalent benefits to their clients’ full-time workforce and makes clients liable for this. The alliance said the concern is clients will not be willing to share their proprietary compensation information and will instead no longer use staffing firms. Staffing firms would also be forced to adjust their own pay scales for categories of work by individual client if clients do share the information.
  2. Delete the section that allows employees to choose their own payroll payment cycle.
  3. Delete the section regulating hiring of temporary staff by clients and placement fees. It noted virtually every staffing contract provides a pathway for clients to hire temporary workers and pay a negotiated fee that rewards the staffing firm for finding the worker and assigning the worker.
  4. Fix a discrepancy in the law between “temporary labor” and “temporary laborer.” It requested the two definitions be consolidated to ensure the segment limitations apply to the entire bill.

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Planning staffing levels also appeared high on the list

According to a survey of CFOs by Gartner Inc, hiring and retaining staff are the most difficult tasks facing Chief Financial Officers over the next 12 months. The tight labor market is one of several factors – including inflation and supply chain disruptions – that are set to challenge corporate profitability through 2023.

Gartner surveyed 234 CFOs in July, and 54% cited hiring and retaining enough workers as their top challenge. It was followed by forecasting (36%) and cutting the right costs (35%).

Marko Horvat, VP, Research, in the Gartner finance practice said: “The data from CFOs align with what we are hearing from HR leaders, namely that competition for talent is expected to become fiercer over the medium term and retaining that talent will become more challenging. CFOs will need to deploy a variety of strategies to ensure critical roles remain filled while also protecting margins.”

Also on the list, “planning staffing levels across the company” was cited by 21% of CFOs.

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51% of HR pros are concerned about it

According to a poll by the Society of Human Resource Management, more than a third of HR professionals (36%) say “quiet quitting” is happening in their organizations with 51% of HR pros are concerned about it.

Quiet quitting has become a buzzword, referring to employees only doing what is necessary for the jobs and not going above and beyond.

Of HR professionals who say their organization is experiencing quiet quitting, 60% report their organization’s culture enables this behavior. Qualitative data from the survey point to issues such as lack of engagement, communication difficulties or poor management of people. Remote and hybrid work was also cited as a concern because of poor supervisor support and lack of accountability.

Johnny Taylor, Jr., President and CEO of SHRM commented: “With a slowing economy, employers can’t afford to have employees loudly or quietly quit. Organizations must ensure they have strong, healthy cultures that are communicated clearly to their employees. Employees who are culturally aligned will thrive; those who aren’t happy with their organization’s culture and way of work should find more ideal employment.”

Other findings:

  • Of HR professionals concerned that quiet quitting will negatively impact their organization, many believe it will decrease employee morale in the workplace (83%), decrease employee productivity (70%) or decrease the quality of employee work products (50%).
  • Of HR professionals who report their organization is experiencing quiet quitting, 72% say they are witnessing millennial employees (those 26-41 years old) quiet quitting within their organization.
  • 43% of HR professionals agree that employee productivity is a big concern at their organization right now.

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Knowledge and expertise are essential for creativity 
According to a recent survey conducted by Gartner, Inc, 49% percent of HR leaders named innovating for success as one of their top three priorities for 2022. The latest findings were announced during the Gartner ReimagineHR Conference, on 16th of September.

Despite HR leaders prioritising innovations, a May 2022 Gartner survey of more than 3,500 employees found that only 46% of employees agree that their organisation encourages creative thinking.

Emily Rose McRae, Senior Director in the Gartner HR practice said: “The survey results show that an organisation’s actions directly impact the ability of employees to be creative by 25%. In fact, an organisation’s actions have more than double the impact of an individual’s personality when it comes to driving employee creativity.”

The analysis found that effective creativity – producing a high volume of relevant and novel ideas – requires three things:

  1. Knowledge and expertise
  2. Ability to overcome “stickiness” of prior knowledge
  3. Imagination

According to the survey results, there are three actions organisations can take to increase employee creativity in general:

Broaden participation to increase knowledge and expertise

In today’s dispersed workforce, individuals seamlessly toggle between asynchronous and synchronous work environments. As such, leaders and teams must create space for idea generation to occur across all modes of work, while simultaneously facilitating participation.

Leaders should also intentionally include employees from all levels. Executives are more likely to spend their time thinking strategically, while managers are more likely to focus on change management, and those more junior may have the clearest understanding of where potential quick wins lie.

McRae continued: “Bringing together employees who reside in various parts of the organisation, both physically and figuratively, will enable the business to harness the diversity of perspective as a knowledge base for creative activities.”

Lower stress to reduce stickiness of prior knowledge

The pressure to respond as work, and the workplace, evolved during the pandemic affected every industry and all leaders and employees. HR has had to exercise creativity in many forms – from developing a hybrid/return-to-office strategy, designing a pandemic talent strategy, to finding flexibility for frontline workers and establishing mechanisms for employee activism.

Finding creative, innovative solutions requires mental and temporal space. At a base level, managers must reduce tasks that crowd out creativity, while ensuring employees have time to decompress and recharge between tasks. At the broadest level, senior leaders should consider if their organisation has a culture that rewards idea generation, regardless of the ultimate success of ideas.

Increase novelty to drive imagination

The shift to hybrid work has limited employee interactions. When work consists primarily of similar days interacting – or not interacting – with the same people, creativity is particularly challenging.

HR should work with managers to bring together people who haven’t worked together before, or who have very different perspectives. Progressive organizations are going a step further and intentionally create shared new experiences among employees. One method is to offer individuals and teams, both remote and onsite, daily or weekly challenges, such as: work from a different location, take a walk in a new neighborhood, or try a new food.

“Adding novelty to the everyday – and sharing it with colleagues – can spark people to see problems differently and thus develop new solutions,” concluded McRae.

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Senior leaders unaware or unwilling to alter approach to managing the workforce

According to the 2022 Culture Report on Tech-Enabled Employee Experience from Achievers Workforce Institute, companies where senior leaders accept remote work are 29% less likely to struggle with attraction and retention.

While employees’ desire for flexibility in the workplace is at an all-time high, senior leaders at many companies are unaware or unwilling to alter their approach to managing the workforce.

In fact, the number one reason that workers changed jobs during the pandemic was for better work flexibility, AWI said. Of the workers who have the option to be hybrid or remote, 85% said they prefer that option. However, two-thirds say company leaders expect them to be in the office at least part-time.

Likewise, 56% of leaders in HR say the C-Suite doesn’t understand this change in the workforce, and 45% say they don’t have support needed to make changes that will attract, engage and retain top talent.

Employer concerns

Dr. Natalie Baumgartner, Achievers Workforce Institute’s Chief Workforce Scientist said: “A major concern for company leaders is fostering a culture of connection and belonging with a dispersed workforce. We know that a strong sense of belonging drives a 3x return on a wide number of business outcomes. Many leaders believe that to achieve their desired culture, employees must be in the same physical space. However, the world of work has changed and so must our approach to creating a sense of belonging for employees. Employees are sharply focused on having an experience of connection and belonging, but they are confident they can achieve it while working from anywhere.”

Despite concerns over their performance, the research found that remote workers were equally as productive as those who worked in the office. It also found that employees are more likely to be engaged and advocate for their company when remote. They also have a tendency to trust their company leaders more.

In addition, HR leaders in companies that support remote work say they’re less likely to struggle when trying to attract and retain top talent.

The AWI study identified four types of technology that can foster the culture that both employees and company leaders are seeking: network, recognition, wellness and feedback. By implementing these systems, research shows that employers find an increase in engagement, belonging, trust and productivity, as well as their employees feeling valued and less burned out, overall.

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Hiring process down to 25 minutes

Package delivery service UPS plans to hire more than 100,000 seasonal employees ahead of the year-end holiday rush. The company made the announcement last week.

UPS noted it has streamlined its hiring process, and it now takes 25 minutes for most people to go from filling out an online application to receiving a job offer. The company said nearly 80% of seasonal positions do not require an interview.

The company is filling full- and part-time seasonal positions, primarily seasonal delivery and commercial drivers license drivers, package handlers and driver helpers. Permanent positions are also available in some areas for those who apply early.

UPS also reported that nearly 35,000 seasonal employees earned permanent positions following the 2021 holidays. A full-time UPS package delivery driver makes an average of $95,000 per year plus an additional $50,000 in contributions to health, wellness and pension benefits.

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However, the sector is at its lowest rate since June 2020

According to the Institute for supply Management report the “Manufacturing ISM Report on Business” the US manufacturing sector grew in August at the same rate as in July — which was the lowest rate in more than two years. While employment in manufacturing picked up, concerns about a slowing economy have remained.

The Manufacturing PMI report is based on a survey of manufacturing supply executives.

Overall, the ISM’s Manufacturing PMI’s reading of 52.8% in both August and July was the lowest level since its 52.4% reading in June 2020. Readings above 50% indicate expansion in the US manufacturing sector.

August’s reading also indicates expansion in the overall economy for the 27th month in a row after contracting in April and May 2020, said Timothy Fiore, chair of the ISM’s Manufacturing Business Survey Committee.

Respondents noted price expansion eased dramatically; however, they continued to express unease about a softening economy.

Employment was a bright spot.

The measure of employment in the report returned to expansion in August after three months of contractions. It was at a reading of 54.2% in August, up from 49.9% in July. Readings above 50.5% over time is generally consistent with an increase in US Bureau of Labor Statistics data on manufacturing employment.

Timothy Fiore, Chair of the ISM’s Manufacturing Business Survey Committee commented: “According to Business Survey Committee respondents’ comments, companies continued to hire at strong rates in August, with few indications of layoffs, hiring freezes or head-count reductions through attrition. Panelists reported lower rates of quits, a positive trend.”

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73% of workers report high levels of stress

According to findings from Alight and Business Group on Health’s research series, 2022 Alight International Workforce and Wellbeing Mindset Study, close to three-quarters (73%) of workers reported high levels of stress due to such factors as the ongoing pandemic, economic concerns and social unrest. Additionally, more than one-third (34%) of workers reported suffering symptoms of burnout, while only one in three employees said their employer cared about their wellbeing.

While employees across the United States and Europe continue to report high levels of stress, a surprising percentage do not take full advantage of their workplace’s well-being initiatives, despite employers’ continued prioritisation of these programmes, a new survey has found.

Ellen Kelsay, President and CEO of Business Group on Health commented: “These sentiments demonstrate a disconnect in employees’ views of their workplace wellbeing benefits, as large employers have continued to make significant investments in workforce wellbeing benefits and programmes.”

Just 15% of employees in the United States and the United Kingdom reported being aware of employer-sponsored stress-management programmes. And of those who were aware of the benefit, less than one-quarter (23%) said they used it, even though 32% of employees wanted their employer to offer more mental health resources.

The survey findings identified key areas of opportunity for companies in prioritising the total wellbeing of their workforce and increasing employee awareness and adoption of available wellbeing programmes. These include:

  • Building awareness of available mental health programmes. Creating engaging and personalised programmes through a combination of technology, navigation and communication can boost employee awareness of available and accessible resources.
  • Supporting long-term financial goals and understanding short-term demands. Long-term financial planning remains a challenge for many employees, who need assistance with reducing debt levels, sticking to a budget, saving for more immediate financial needs and having longer-term savings goals. Balanced financial wellbeing programmes that provide smart steps for employees to take today can help boost overall financial wellbeing and reduce one of life’s major stressors.
  • Providing balance and flexibility. The pandemic demonstrated that workers value flexibility and, for those who can, being able to work remotely at least some of the time. More than half of employees (54%) said a flexible work environment differentiated one employer from another, creating an opportunity for employers to set themselves apart from peers. Additionally, more than half (59%) of all workers said being able to work remotely had a positive impact on their

Kantar conducted the research, surveying more than 10,000 employees from February 2022 to March 2022 in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, France and the Netherlands. This marked the first time the study included countries outside the United States. Additional reports about the research will be issued later this year.

Stephan Scholl, CEO of Alight Solutions said: “Workers worldwide found that COVID-19 intensified challenges to wellbeing. As a result, they sometimes face difficulties in showing up to work as their best selves, which ultimately affects companies’ bottom line. At the same time, caring about employee wellbeing is critical to recruiting and retaining talent.”

Other survey findings:

  • Fewer than half of UK employees (44%) believe their company does an overall good job at communicating with them
  • Only 1 in 10 employees in the UK rated their employee experience as awesome whilst 42% deemed it as okay, pretty bad or awful.
  • Nearly a third (31%) of UK employees would not say great things about their employer given the chance.
  • US. employees tended to have a more positive view of their overall wellbeing than those in Europe. More than half (53%) of U.S. employees rated their overall wellbeing highly, compared to 40% in the U.K.

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The US-based firm noted the increase in fee revenue was primarily driven by continued demand for integrated service offerings and the acquisitions of Lucas Group and Patina Solutions Group in the previous quarters

Korn Ferry a global organizational consulting firm has announced first quarter fee revenue of $695.9 million. In addition, first quarter diluted earnings per share was $1.45 and adjusted diluted earnings per share was $1.50.

Gary D. Burnison, CEO at Korn Ferry said: “I am pleased with our financial results during the fiscal first quarter. We generated $696 million in fee revenue, up 19% (24% at constant currency) year over year. Our diluted earnings per share and adjusted diluted earnings per share were $1.45 and $1.50, respectively, and our Adjusted EBITDA was $132 million, representing a 19% margin.”

“We are in a new paradigm as global organizations fight for growth and relevancy while facing economic ambiguity. Today’s workscape has never been more complex – an imbalanced labor market, skills shortage and a major shift in how and where people work. While cycles will continually change, the long-term premium on people endures. Strategy without talent is helpless and talent without strategy is hopeless. Korn Ferry is the firm that helps clients drive performance through synchronizing their organization, their strategy and their people.”

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Talent Solutions

Acquisition strengthens Nash Squared as a major MSP

Nash Squared, a provider of talent and technology solutions, has become a major force in Managed Service Provision with its recent acquisition of Het Flexhuis – a Managed Service Provider (MSP) of talent and recruitment services based in The Netherlands.

Het Flexhuis has a strong track record in delivering outsourced recruitment services for government, public services, and commercial organisations and will operate as an independent brand within Nash Squared’s recruitment business Harvey Nash.

Bev White, CEO of Nash Squared, commented: “I am delighted to welcome Het Flexhuis into the Nash Squared family. It is our vision to help our clients access talent and technology in every way possible, and offering a high quality MSP solution is an important next step for us. Het Flexhuis brings enormous experience and expertise with them, and I am excited by the potential.”

Occo Lijding, MD of Harvey Nash The Netherlands, commented: “This represents a step change in how we can help and support our clients in talent and technology. I have long admired the team at Het Flexhuis, and when we met I was struck by how similar our values and ambitions were. They are the perfect fit for us, and I look forward to working with them.”

Frederieke Schmidt Crans, Managing Director, Het Flexhuis commented: “We are thrilled and excited to become part of Nash Squared. Our company was established ten years ago with a mission to create a world-class MSP with great people and processes at its core. We see joining Nash Squared as the natural next chapter in that success story.”

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Search engines combine forces to accelerate Adzuna’s growth in the US

On Tuesday, 14 June, Adzuna announced their acquisition of the US job search engine Getwork.

The Getwork team, under the leadership of Brad Squibb, will be working alongside the Adzuna team, intending to accelerate Adzuna’s growth in North America.

Getwork links job seekers with vacant roles at North American companies by indexing millions of verified jobs daily directly from tens of thousands of employer career sites.

Adzuna, with headquarters in London, UK, Indianapolis, IN, and Sydney, AU, uses AI-powered technology to match people to jobs. The company has recently launched in Switzerland, Belgium, Spain, and Mexico. Their operations now cover 20 markets globally.

The two companies will operate as independent brands with their own established communities.

Doug Monro, CEO, and Co-founder of Adzuna, comments: “Adzuna acquiring Getwork will help us supercharge our growth in North America. The Getwork team’s stellar reputation for great service and delivery has led them to be trusted by an impressive roster of household name companies in the US. It’s also a great fit as their team and mission are so aligned with ours. The US enterprise market is crying out for strong alternatives to existing offerings and we’re looking forward to combining Adzuna’s marketing expertise, global footprint and programmatic job matching technology with Getwork’s deep industry knowledge and reputation to deliver even better for our customers. The US is the fastest-growing part of our business and this acquisition will accelerate our profitable growth trajectory.”

Brad Squibb, President of Getwork, comments: “Adzuna is a truly global business, operating across 20 countries, which creates an exciting opportunity for us to scale into new markets with the help of a brand that has already paved the way for international expansion. We can’t wait to join Doug and the team on this journey.”

 

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Despite efforts there is still massive room for improvement in UK management and reporting

In research released today, findings reveal a lack of focus on progressing diversity in the workplace. In the study conducted by SD Worx, it was found that while 68% of UK companies are committed to removing unconscious bias in the recruitment process, many have failed to implement a reporting system to track progress on meeting ED&I objectives.

The survey revealed that only 26% of UK companies evaluate managerial commitment to achieving ED&I-related objectives. A further 32% admitted having no systems allowing employees to report discrimination.

The UK ranked third in its commitment to removing unconscious bias at 68% when it comes to ranking. Ireland ranked first at 74%, with Belgium coming in second, at 69%.

As far as rankings for equal access to training, the UK is slightly lower than other countries, with 64% of companies investing in equal access to training and development. Ireland (72%), Belgium (71%), and Poland (69%) topped the list.

While 64% of UK companies include transparency about ED&I goals and actions to attract a diverse workforce in their mission statement and corporate values, only 60% of the UK companies surveyed said that they promote ED&I in job advertisements, social media, and their websites.

The survey also revealed that countries vary in their level of focus concerning educating and involving managers in their ED&I policies. For example, in the UK, 60% of companies stated that they actively involve their managers in ED&I policies, and 60% provide internal training on the topic.

Colette Philp, UK HR Country Lead at SD Worx commented: “It’s no longer enough for businesses to say they prioritise diversity and inclusion. Instead, they must prove their commitment to achieving a more diverse workforce, both internally within their business and externally to attract talent.”

“There is more awareness than ever before regarding diversity in the workplace and it’s a deciding factor for many when it comes to searching for a role or staying with a business. A diverse workforce brings new experiences and perspectives and an inclusive environment allows individuals to thrive. If businesses aren’t already putting ED&I as a top priority, it’s essential they act now to do so.”

Jurgen Dejonghe, Portfolio Manager SD Worx Insights, added: “It’s important that companies start investing in an active reporting system about their actions concerning diversity, equality and inclusion. On the one hand, that data offers a strong basis for optimising the diversity policy with concrete and consciously controlled actions. On the other hand, such a system also provides clear evidence whether companies are effectively putting their money where their mouth is and not making false promises to (future) employees.”

For ED&I initiatives to be successful, change needs to come from the top, with proper rollouts and reporting system to track their progress.

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TALiNT Partners has announced the finalists for the 2022 TIARA Talent Solutions Awards with 22 of the United States’ best Talent Solutions, MSP & RPO firms shortlisted across eight award categories.

The finalists for the 2022 Talent Solutions Awards US, which spotlight MSP, RPO and Talent Solutions providers delivering excellence in recruitment and talent acquisition across the US, are the top of the crop and represent the very best in providers in the industry.

Ken Brotherston, Chief Executive of TALiNT Partners made comment: “Following the inaugural TIARA Talent Solutions Awards US last year, I am delighted to see many of our 2021 finalists return to celebrate their achievements, as well as a number of new entrants this year. The 2022 Awards are a true celebration across the market, from the large global players to newer entrants and niche RPO organizations, all demonstrating excellence in their impact for employers and their own employees.”

“The TIARAs are distinguished by the rigor of its judging process and the quality of its judging panel,” he added. “Entries will be assessed by our esteemed judges through six key metrics: excellence in delivery; innovation; DE&I impact; sustainable value; business growth; and purpose.”

What sets the TIARAs apart from other awards programs is their independent panel of expert judges and individual feedback given back to each finalist.

The judges for this year’s TIARA Talent Solutions Awards are drawn from the HR and Talent Acquisition community are:

  • Sachin Jain, Senior Director – Global Talent Management, PepsiCo
  • Andrew Brown, Director RPO and Recruiting, Cornerstone
  • Russell Griffiths, General Manager, Coleman Research
  • Rich Genovese, Global Head – Talent Identification & Discovery, Jazz Pharmaceuticals
  • Gregg Schneider, Senior Manager – Procurement Plus, Global Talent Marketplace and Innovation Lead, Accenture
  • Justin Brown, Talent Acquisition Project Manager, Gallagher
  • Chris Farmer, Global Program Owner, Salesforce
  • Kerri Arman, Former VP Global Head of Talent, American Express Global Business Travel
  • Saleem Khaja, COO and Co-Founder, WorkLLama
  • Fitzgerald Ventura, CEO, 1099Policy
  • Mike Wilczak, Chief Product Officer, iCIMS

Judges will convene in May to debate and decide the winner of each category Award as well as an overall Talent Solutions Provider of the Year. All winners will be announced at an exclusive virtual awards ceremony on Thursday June 9th, 18:00 EDT.

Winners will also be profiled in a special TIARA Awards supplement published with TALiNT International.

The TIARA 2022 campaign is supported by our headline partner Cornerstone, and sponsored by WorkLLama, 1099Policy, and iCIMS.

The full list of TIARA 2022 Talent Solutions Finalists can be viewed here.

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