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Latest in the Region: EMEA

Report finds 47% of ex-employees still using former employer’s passwords.

According to a new report by PasswordManager.com, employers should not only worry about hackers but also about former employees who still have access to their accounts. The study revealed that 47% of 1,000 workers still use their former employer’s passwords even after leaving the company. The majority of them (58%) had not changed their passwords since they left, while 44% got their passwords from someone still working for the company, and 6.2% were able to guess it. More than half of the respondents (56.2%) used the passwords to access information for personal use, while 28% used them to access paid tools or subscriptions. The report also found that one in three respondents had been doing this for more than two years, and only 15% of them had been caught.

Daniel Farber Huang, Head of Privacy and Cybersecurity, warned former employees that the misuse of proprietary information could have legal implications. Employers should make their standards of care and conduct “100% clear” to employees, according to Huang. This should include authorized as well as unauthorized handling of intellectual property. Companies should create incentives for managing information properly and consider penalties or corrections for intentional or negligent use of information, including passwords and company accounts.

The report also highlighted poor cybersecurity among employers, despite recent attacks on major organizations worldwide. Huang attributed this lack of proper security to the cost factor and the need for a staff person to manage the ongoing process. Companies should value the importance of this role and not outsource it or pile it onto a junior staffer. Employers should provide clear guidelines for employees to follow and offer incentives for managing information properly.

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Climate change impact – a significant factor in job hunting

Seventy-six percent of young Europeans believe that the climate impact of prospective employers is an important factor when job hunting. This is according to the second part of the 2022-2023 European Investment Bank (EIB) Climate Survey.

The survey explores people’s views on climate change. Some of the results from the latest yearly European Investment Bank (EIB) Climate Survey, conducted in August 2022, included:

  • 76% of Europeans aged 20-29 say the climate impact of prospective employers is an important factor when job hunting and 22% say it is even a top priority.
  • 66% of all European respondents favour stricter government measures to impose a change in personal behaviour (72% of people under 30).
  • 79% of European respondents favour labelling all food to help limit the impact on climate and the environment.
  • 62% of Europeans say they would pay more for climate-friendly food.
  • 56% would be in favour of a carbon budget system to set a cap on the most climate-damaging consumption (62% of people under 30).

With the war in Ukraine continuing, rising energy prices and inflation have dramatically increased concerns about declining purchasing power in Europe. Climate change, however, remains the second biggest challenge facing Europeans, according to respondents. Seventy-two percent of respondents said they are convinced that their behaviour can make a difference in addressing the situation.

Many believe that the government has a role in encouraging individual behavioural change, with 66% favouring stricter government measures to force change in people’s behaviour. In addition, 72% of respondents under 30 agreed they would welcome such measures.

Increasing numbers of job seekers entering the workforce each year are looking at employers’ climate credentials when job hunting. Among the respondents, 62% say it is important that prospective employers prioritise sustainability, and 16% say it is a top priority.

Among people aged 20 to 29, typically first job seekers, 76% say that sustainability is an important factor in their choice of employer, and 22% say it is a top priority.

Many European respondents (56%) favoured a carbon budget system that would allocate a fixed number of yearly credits to each individual. These could be spent on items with a big carbon footprint (non-essential goods, flights, meat, etc.). This option was very popular among Chinese respondents (83%), but Americans were less supportive at 49%. Interestingly, the majority of Europeans favour this measure regardless of income.

Food production is responsible for a significant share of greenhouse gas emissions. To encourage people to make more sustainable choices when grocery shopping, 79% of Europeans suggested labelling all food products with their climate footprint.

A further 62% of Europeans said they would be willing to pay slightly more for food produced locally and sustainably. This willingness to pay more for food spans all income groups.

Another efficient way to limit greenhouse gas emissions is to reduce the consumption of meat and dairy products. Fifty-one percent said they would support limiting the purchase of these products to fight climate change.

Ambroise Fayolle, EIB Vice-President, said: The outcome of the EIB Climate Survey shows that Europeans are willing to help fight climate change at the individual level. As the EU climate bank, we welcome this commitment. It complements our role of financing green services such as sustainable transport, renewable energy, and energy-efficient buildings. In 2022, we supported green projects in Europe with investments amounting to €32.4 billion, many of which helped create new jobs. We will continue to support the acceleration of the green transition, one in which everyone can play their part and where no one is left behind.”

 

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52% of all employment is done by key workers

A new report by the International Labour Organization (ILO) has called for countries to improve the working conditions and earnings of key workers who were essential during the COVID-19 crisis. The report, World Employment and Social Outlook 2023: The value of essential work, highlights the extent to which economies and societies depend on key workers, yet they are undervalued.

Key workers can be found in eight main occupational groups and in the 90 countries where data was available, 52% of all employment is done by key workers. However, on average, key workers earn 26% less than other employees, with 29% of them being low paid. The report recommends greater investment in physical infrastructure, productive capacity, and human resources of key sectors, among other recommendations, to ensure the continuity of essential services during future pandemics or other shocks.

Gilbert F. Houngbo, ILO Director-General commented: “Healthcare workers, supermarket cashiers, delivery workers, postal workers, seafarers, cleaners, and others supplying food and necessities continued to perform their jobs, day in and day out, even at the height of the pandemic, often at great personal risk. Valuing key workers means ensuring that they receive adequate pay and work in good conditions. Decent work is an objective for all workers but it is particularly critical for key workers, who provide vital necessities and services both in good times and bad.”

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49% of organisations in the GCC currently offer remote or hybrid working

Hays Middle East, part of Hays plc, the global workforce solutions and specialist recruitment company, has released its latest Salary Guide 2023 for the Gulf Corporation Council (GCC). The guide provides comprehensive salary data for over 400 roles across 13 industries across the region, with the latest workforce trends based on expert insights and the analysis of a survey of over 2,000 employers and professionals.

The guide has revealed that despite global disruptions, the GCC has remained stable, with continuous investment and diversification leading to a buoyant labour market in 2023, creating new jobs across multiple sectors and geographies in the region with this being exemplified by 85% of employers planning to recruit permanent employees. However, with 45% professionals looking to change organisations, greater competition for the best talent is to be expected.

Employers can leverage flexible working options to counter competition

Hays believes that offering flexible working options is a viable way for employers to counter the fierce competition. The guide shows that while only 49% of organisations in the GCC currently offer remote or hybrid working options, 20% of employers anticipate that employees will be required in the workplace more. Professionals place work-life balance and flexible working as a top priority when looking for a new job.

Addressing the skills dissonance is vital for future success

According to the report, employers and employees in the GCC have different perceptions of talent availability within their organisations. The guide indicates that while 82% of employees firmly believe they have the necessary skills to fulfill their role in 2023, only 35% of employers strongly agree they have the talent needed for the coming year. Employers and employees must work together to address this disconnect to ensure success in the future.

Growth on the horizon for Technology and Industrial Sectors, plus accelerated Emiratisation

The guide highlighted that technology remains the most active industry sector for hiring, with 77% of organisations increasing their headcount last year, thanks to consistent local and foreign direct investment in focus areas such as data, cyber security, and cloud solutions. Despite uncertainty in the global Technology sector, growth in the GCC continues at pace. Indeed, 88% of employers plan to recruit permanent employees in 2023.

In Saudi Arabia, the industrial sector is expanding at an exponential rate. With the Kingdom poised to take further advantage of its abundant natural resources and central geographical location, industrial diversification into new products and materials will lead to a focus on talent with experience, technical skills, and operational knowledge.

In the UAE, almost one in two (49%) of employers will ramp up their hiring of UAE national citizens this year as they work to meet Emiratisation quotas and diversify their workforce.

Sarah Dixon, Managing Director of Hays Middle East commented: “2023 promises to be a prosperous year for the labour market and the GCC in general, with new jobs being created across multiple sectors and geographies in the region through investment initiatives from a multitude of sources. The Hays GCC Salary Guide 2023 provides valuable insights for both employers and professionals, helping them navigate the recruiting landscape of today and stay competitive for tomorrow.”

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Sweden has most women in leadership roles

Findings from a survey conducted by Reboot Online have revealed that Sweden is the best European country for women to work in while the UK was ranked 12th.

Reboot SEO Agency found that the UK has the highest number of women in leadership positions of all the European countries studied, taking into account wage equality for similar work and estimated income – that’s 317 active-duty leadership positions in 2022. However, the data revealed a disappointing 11.6 paid full weeks of maternity leave which equals a score of 6.9/ 100 for the UK.

The Reboot Online survey also showed that Sweden is the best European country offering the best work opportunities for women in 2023, with a combined total of 241.4 points out of a possible 300. It is unsurprising that Swedish women thrive in the workplace, as the data showed that there are plenty of opportunities for women in leadership positions (93.1/100) which equates to 13.8 fewer points than neighbouring country Norway in third place.

Following in second place was Finland with a combined score of 227.6 out of 300, 13.8 fewer points than Sweden. Finland scored 86.2/100 points for women in leadership positions and economic opportunity. That equated to 65.5 more points for women in leadership than Estonia in seventh with 20.7 out of 100 for this category.

In third place is Norway with a combined total of 213.8 points out of a possible 300, 6.8 more points than Lithuania in fourth. The data showed that the country offers 39.9 full paid weeks of maternity leave, which gave them a score of 55.2/100, equal to the maternity leave in Finland.

Turkey is the country with the least economic opportunities for women

In last place is Turkey, scoring 31 points out of a possible 300. Despite its poor performance, the country surprisingly earned more points for women in leadership (27.6/100) than countries known to champion gender equality, such as Austria (13.8/100 points).

Naomi Aharony, CEO and Co-Founder at Reboot SEO Agency commented: “The overall results have suggested that there is some progress in terms of gender equality in the workplace in Europe. Norway, Finland and Sweden ranked highly, indicating that there are some improvements being made. Although, the disappointing positions of European countries such as Austria and Czech Republic reaffirm that the progress towards gender parity remains slow in Europe.

Although it is good to see some advancement, women still face numerous challenges when it comes to gender equality in the workplace that involves not only the wage gap, lack of leadership representation, government incentives and work-life balance.”

Full report can be found at https://www.rebootonline.com/

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This totals 5% of its workforce

Dell has announced plans to lay off 5% of its workforce, or about 6,650 employees, according to an SEC filing.

The cuts at Dell come as demand for PCs and laptops has slowed globally. Global shipments of PCs were down 28% year over year in the fourth quarter of 2022, according to industry analysts at IDC. Computer shipments at Dell fell 37% for that same period, while competitors Lenovo, HP and Apple were down 28%, 29% and 2%, respectively.

Shares of Dell closed down 3% Monday.

In a memo to employees, Jeff Clarke, Co-Chief Operating Officer at Dell, said the cuts were made in an effort to “stay ahead of downturn impacts.” He said the moves Dell had already implemented, like limiting travel, pausing external hiring and reducing outside services spending, were no longer sufficient.

Clarke said: “Unfortunately, with changes like this, some members of our team will be leaving the company. There is no tougher decision, but one we had to make for our long-term health and success.”

As of Jan. 28, 2022, Dell had 133,000 total employees, according to a company filing with the SEC. In the memo to employees, Clarke said Dell has navigated economic downturns before, and “emerged stronger” as a result.

“We will be ready when the market rebounds,” he wrote. But this is cold comfort for those who have lost their jobs.

The company’s layoff announcement marks the latest round of job cuts in the tech industry, as PayPal on Tuesday announced plans to cut 2,000 jobs. In January, Google revealed plans to lay off more than 12,000 workersMicrosoft disclosed plans to cut 10,000 employees and Salesforce announced plans to lay off 7,000 workers.

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Gender pay gap also remains an issue in the workplace

A new report by team building company Wildgoose revealed that 27% of women have pregnancy discrimination as a key concern in the workplace, highlighting the need for UK businesses to address their policies and culture.

The 2022 Diversity & Inclusion in the Workplace Report found that women are significantly less likely to state that their workplace is inclusive. Only 75% of female employees believe their workplace is inclusive, compared to 88% of male employees.

The areas of inclusion that companies need to focus on differ regionally. The report found that discrimination against pregnancy in the workplace, for example, insufficient maternity/paternity allowances, was most common in the East Midlands (35%).

The report surveyed employees from 133 UK workplaces, asking whether their workplace is an inclusive environment, where their organisation could improve, and whether they have experienced discrimination or inequality at work.

The report also revealed that almost one in five female respondents had experienced discriminatory behaviour in the workplace. A further 13% said their companies did not deal with the issue. Clearly, there are real flaws in the culture at many UK workplaces, where efforts are not being made to help women feel respected and safe.

Another cause for concern is the gender pay gap. More than a quarter of employees said they know they or a colleague receive less salary than someone else in the same position. Twenty-nine percent of female respondents said they experienced pay disparity in the workplace, compared to only 25% of males.

Pay inequality is more prevalent in London. The report found that employees in the North East are most likely to receive ‘pay parity’; however, 20% of people in the North East were aware of instances in their company where salaries were unequal.

Pay parity is vital in creating an inclusive workplace, whereas unequal pay causes employees to feel unrecognised for their work.

Jonny Edser, Managing Director at Wildgoose, commented: “With a potential recession around the corner, businesses will be looking to optimise performance as much as possible. One way to do this is by making sure they’re a meritocracy, where people can make the most of their abilities and rise regardless of their gender or background. By combating discrimination, they’ll also be creating a more harmonious working environment and higher job satisfaction.”

 “With so many workplaces suffering from inclusivity issues, it’s important that companies make efforts to bring their people together. We know how effective social activities can be in forming bonds between colleagues and creating a level playing field. And that has to be the aim: to make employees realise they’re all equal.”

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More than a quarter a seeking help to cope with stress

Financial worries are top the list of factors affecting workers’ productivity. This is according to a new survey conducted by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. The survey revealed that almost one-third of workers (approximately 8.2 million people) said they experienced low work productivity due to financial concerns. A further 31% said that they expect a similar scenario within the next year. With the country facing a massive cost of living crisis, these figures are no surprise.

According to the study, 20% of the British public (13.4 million people) were already living in poverty in 2020/21, with 7.9 million being working-age adults. The projections were also not positive. The New Economics Forum estimates that by December 2024, 43% of UK households will not be able to afford a decent standard of living.

The survey found that 40% of workers have experienced physical and mental strain due to their financial pressures a further 32% lose sleep. In addition, a quarter of respondents reported feeling depressed.

For those who are affected mentally:

  • 26% are seeking help to cope with stress
  • 20% expect to speak to a mental health professional or receive counselling
  • 19% plan to seek advice from their GP

The mental health crisis in the UK is growing, with the waiting list for mental health patients at a record 7.2 million and a waiting time of 47 weeks, according to data from October 2022.

The British public are looking for appropriate pay increases to deal with soaring prices. The respondents were asked to choose a suitable increase from 1% to 12%.

34% said a 5% pay rise sounds ‘about right’

34% felt the same about a 10% rise

People who voted for Tories in the last election found 5% to be fair (41%)

People who voted for Labour said 10% would be appropriate (43%)

Retired Brits also agreed with the 5% rise (35%)

Jonathan Merry, CEO of Moneyzine.com, commented: “The figures paint a grim picture, but also show how much employers need to rehash their duty of care policies and refine their outreach to struggling employees. Although limited in their power, firms need to keep their ends up to support their workers in these testing times.”

Read the full article here.

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HR Tech market is predicted to grow to $39.9 billion by 2029

The fourth annual campaign for Europe’s TIARA Talent Tech Star Awards has been launched and recognises innovation, excellence and growth in the HR Tech and RecTech industry.

Alex Evans, Managing Director at TALiNT Partners commented: “Talent tech continues to enable the transformation of HR and Recruitment as both employers and recruiters adapt to the changing expectations of candidates, clients and their own employees. The value of the global HR Tech market is predicted to grow to $39.9 billion by 2029 – but who will lead the market and drive innovation?”

“The TIARA Talent Tech Star Awards shine a spotlight on the best solutions for employers and recruiters to enhance service and experience for candidates and contractors. This campaign recognises excellence across a spectrum of awards with a judging panel comprising buyers, investors and advisors from across the talent ecosystem to make it an award worth winning.”

The 2022 winners included Bright Network, Sonovate, Sova Assessment, Paiger, HireVue, Worksome, Eli Onboarding, Pixid, Talos360, Mercury and Eightfold AI (see who won which award and why here).

Georgios Markakis, Managing Partner at Venero Capital Advisors also commented: “Venero is proud to partner with the TIARAs and once again sponsor the Champion of Champions Award to showcase Work Tech solutions which exemplify innovation, value and impact.”

Despite high inflation and recession fears, $19.4bn was invested in HR/Rech in 2022 – the second-best year for the sector according to research from Venero Capital Advisors – with 132 deals in Europe, UK & Ireland.

Ken Brotherston, CEO of TALiNT Partners said: “The alumni of finalists and winners of the TIARA Talent Tech Star Awards represent challengers, disruptors and transformers across a spectrum of business growth, from high potential, early-stage start-ups to scaling SMEs and established market leaders. They have validated game-changing innovation and excellent customer service with solid case studies and testimonials.

“This year we will once again celebrate the Talent Tech Stars who are championing innovation in different parts of the talent ecosystem and enabling employers and recruiters to adapt and transform. Our judges will look for good financial performance, well-executed innovation, customer service that goes beyond the norm, the best return on investment in people and profit with purpose. They will also look at their ambition, vision and the change they are championing.”

The judging process for the TIARA Talent Tech Star Awards is designed around the expectations of buyers and investors, based on key performance metrics, case studies and testimonials. Our impressive and influential panel of judges from companies including LinkedIn, ManpowerGroup, Optima Corporate Finance, AMS, and Reed Talent Solutions will follow our rigorous judging process to decide the winners in 14 categories.

The entry deadline for the 2023 awards is Friday 21st April with finalists announced in early May. This year, winners will be announced at a black-tie gala dinner on Thursday 29th June at the Montcalm, Marble Arch, in London.

To find out more about this year’s award categories and to start your entry, visit https://talenttech.tiara.talint.co.uk/.

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Mexican labor reform decreases agency work volume of business by 80%

The regulatory outlook for the staffing industry remains negative for the next six months in 13 countries, according to the World Employment Confederation’s recently released Staffing Executive Regulatory Outlook report. The impact changes in regulation are expected to be neutral in seven countries and positive in four.

Overall, the staffing industry anticipates regulatory changes to have a positive impact in the Netherlands, Spain, UK and Italy.

The report noted following the Mexican labor reform implemented in September 2021, agency work is no longer allowed in Mexico, decreasing the volume of business by 80% compared to the situation before the reform. However, agency work can continue operating in “specialized services” falling outside the core activity of the user company.

In Europe, the expected negative regulatory changes include:

  • A new regulation on the maximum length of an assignment in Sweden.
  • A new regulation on statutory sick pay and pensions in Ireland.
  • Discussions and possible regulation on the overall protection of agency workers covered by collective labor agreements in Germany, linked to the EU Court of Justice proceeding.
  • Discussions on the use of agency work in the healthcare sector in both Denmark and France.
  • A new law entering into force in Norway on maximum length of assignment and a regional ban in the construction sector.

The biannual poll includes responses from executives of 24 different national staffing federations. It was conducted in October.

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Talent Solutions

TALiNT Partners and Stratigens are proud to announce a strategic partnership which will provide an unparalleled range of talent intelligence solutions to the needs of our members, partners and clients.

Alison Ettridge, CEO of Stratigens said “Companies do research on their customers, their markets and their competitors to inform decisions all the time. With Stratigens, they can now do research on the greatest asset –access to the workforce and people they need to deliver their strategy. Our partnership with TALiNT Partners will support our mission of putting human capital at the heart of business decision making. We are really excited about working with the team to overlay the insight that TALiNT Partners’ network brings with labour market data to empower HR, TA and business leaders to make critical strategic decisions.”

Ken Brotherston, CEO of TALiNT Partners added “for some time we have been looking for a partner to support the insight generated by our network with global workplace data to bring a unique offering to the market. Stratigens is the perfect partner to help us achieve this and together we look forward to continuing to help raise capability in how employers find and keep the people they need, and how staffing and talent solutions providers can better support their clients.”

About Stratigens

Stratigens software is helping the world’s best companies make smarter decisions about where to grow, who to hire from and the diversity of their workforce. We join the dots between the labour market, economics and locations. Putting human capital intelligence at the heart of decision making.

We live in a world rich with skills and geo economic data, but the data is messy, unstructured, big and in thousands of places. Stratigens uses the latest in machine learning and big data to gather, extract, categorise and label the data, and put it into a format that’s easy to digest. So our clients can make smarter, faster, more informed decisions.

Stratigens – https://www.stratigens.com

About TALiNT Partners

TALiNT Partners connects the talent ecosystem. We bring together a global network of leading employers and solution providers to make better talent and technology decisions. Providing intelligence, insight and peer-to-peer networking that drives quality, innovation and improves inclusion across the talent ecosystem

TALiNT Partners – https://talintpartners.com/

 

If you would like to know more about the partnership, please contact Ken Brotherston, CEO of TALiNT Partners, ken@talintpartners.com

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Acquisition strengthens Nash Squared as a major MSP

Nash Squared, a provider of talent and technology solutions, has become a major force in Managed Service Provision with its recent acquisition of Het Flexhuis – a Managed Service Provider (MSP) of talent and recruitment services based in The Netherlands.

Het Flexhuis has a strong track record in delivering outsourced recruitment services for government, public services, and commercial organisations and will operate as an independent brand within Nash Squared’s recruitment business Harvey Nash.

Bev White, CEO of Nash Squared, commented: “I am delighted to welcome Het Flexhuis into the Nash Squared family. It is our vision to help our clients access talent and technology in every way possible, and offering a high quality MSP solution is an important next step for us. Het Flexhuis brings enormous experience and expertise with them, and I am excited by the potential.”

Occo Lijding, MD of Harvey Nash The Netherlands, commented: “This represents a step change in how we can help and support our clients in talent and technology. I have long admired the team at Het Flexhuis, and when we met I was struck by how similar our values and ambitions were. They are the perfect fit for us, and I look forward to working with them.”

Frederieke Schmidt Crans, Managing Director, Het Flexhuis commented: “We are thrilled and excited to become part of Nash Squared. Our company was established ten years ago with a mission to create a world-class MSP with great people and processes at its core. We see joining Nash Squared as the natural next chapter in that success story.”

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Search engines combine forces to accelerate Adzuna’s growth in the US

On Tuesday, 14 June, Adzuna announced their acquisition of the US job search engine Getwork.

The Getwork team, under the leadership of Brad Squibb, will be working alongside the Adzuna team, intending to accelerate Adzuna’s growth in North America.

Getwork links job seekers with vacant roles at North American companies by indexing millions of verified jobs daily directly from tens of thousands of employer career sites.

Adzuna, with headquarters in London, UK, Indianapolis, IN, and Sydney, AU, uses AI-powered technology to match people to jobs. The company has recently launched in Switzerland, Belgium, Spain, and Mexico. Their operations now cover 20 markets globally.

The two companies will operate as independent brands with their own established communities.

Doug Monro, CEO, and Co-founder of Adzuna, comments: “Adzuna acquiring Getwork will help us supercharge our growth in North America. The Getwork team’s stellar reputation for great service and delivery has led them to be trusted by an impressive roster of household name companies in the US. It’s also a great fit as their team and mission are so aligned with ours. The US enterprise market is crying out for strong alternatives to existing offerings and we’re looking forward to combining Adzuna’s marketing expertise, global footprint and programmatic job matching technology with Getwork’s deep industry knowledge and reputation to deliver even better for our customers. The US is the fastest-growing part of our business and this acquisition will accelerate our profitable growth trajectory.”

Brad Squibb, President of Getwork, comments: “Adzuna is a truly global business, operating across 20 countries, which creates an exciting opportunity for us to scale into new markets with the help of a brand that has already paved the way for international expansion. We can’t wait to join Doug and the team on this journey.”

 

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Despite efforts there is still massive room for improvement in UK management and reporting

In research released today, findings reveal a lack of focus on progressing diversity in the workplace. In the study conducted by SD Worx, it was found that while 68% of UK companies are committed to removing unconscious bias in the recruitment process, many have failed to implement a reporting system to track progress on meeting ED&I objectives.

The survey revealed that only 26% of UK companies evaluate managerial commitment to achieving ED&I-related objectives. A further 32% admitted having no systems allowing employees to report discrimination.

The UK ranked third in its commitment to removing unconscious bias at 68% when it comes to ranking. Ireland ranked first at 74%, with Belgium coming in second, at 69%.

As far as rankings for equal access to training, the UK is slightly lower than other countries, with 64% of companies investing in equal access to training and development. Ireland (72%), Belgium (71%), and Poland (69%) topped the list.

While 64% of UK companies include transparency about ED&I goals and actions to attract a diverse workforce in their mission statement and corporate values, only 60% of the UK companies surveyed said that they promote ED&I in job advertisements, social media, and their websites.

The survey also revealed that countries vary in their level of focus concerning educating and involving managers in their ED&I policies. For example, in the UK, 60% of companies stated that they actively involve their managers in ED&I policies, and 60% provide internal training on the topic.

Colette Philp, UK HR Country Lead at SD Worx commented: “It’s no longer enough for businesses to say they prioritise diversity and inclusion. Instead, they must prove their commitment to achieving a more diverse workforce, both internally within their business and externally to attract talent.”

“There is more awareness than ever before regarding diversity in the workplace and it’s a deciding factor for many when it comes to searching for a role or staying with a business. A diverse workforce brings new experiences and perspectives and an inclusive environment allows individuals to thrive. If businesses aren’t already putting ED&I as a top priority, it’s essential they act now to do so.”

Jurgen Dejonghe, Portfolio Manager SD Worx Insights, added: “It’s important that companies start investing in an active reporting system about their actions concerning diversity, equality and inclusion. On the one hand, that data offers a strong basis for optimising the diversity policy with concrete and consciously controlled actions. On the other hand, such a system also provides clear evidence whether companies are effectively putting their money where their mouth is and not making false promises to (future) employees.”

For ED&I initiatives to be successful, change needs to come from the top, with proper rollouts and reporting system to track their progress.

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