TALiNT International provides unique business insight for recruitment companies, in-house talent acquisition teams, RPOs and HR tech providers through daily news, weekly newsletters and industry leading monthly magazines.

Featured

Latest in the Region: Europe

Side has 300,000 active candidates

Randstad NV has announced that Randstad France will acquire Side, a leading end-to-end digital staffing platform in the region. It’s said that the acquisition strengthens Randstad’s offering and market position through increased digital presence and capabilities.

Side was founded in 2016b and are specialists in online recruitment that offers digital staffing solutions to over 2,000 customers. With 300,000 active candidates on their books, they operate primarily in the logistics, trade and service sectors.

The acquisition of Side would lead Randstad towards a strong extension of Randstad’s current portfolio as well as enable them access to new opportunities for existing and potential clients.

Sander van’t Noordende, CEO at Randstad made comment: “The role of technology is becoming increasingly important in the world of HR services. In a tightening labour market, this acquisition would allow us to offer customers and talent a new solution to those looking for a fully digital experience. However, it is our shared values and the belief in the crucial role of the ‘human touch’ underpinned by technology which makes me excited to welcome their great people to our team.”

Pierre Mugnier, Co-founder and CEO, Side also commented: “This acquisition fuels our ambition to offer the best online staffing experience to candidates and businesses. It’s a great recognition of the strength of our team and our unique approach mixing cutting-edge technologies with high quality human touches. We’re looking forward to joining forces with the Randstad Group’s talented teams and combining our online user experience expertise with the world’s largest HR services provider.”

The transaction has been presented to the applicable employee representative bodies and is expected to close in the coming weeks.

 

 

Share this article on social media

Businesses must hire carefully to find suitable candidates in today’s fast-paced market.

According to global software and fintech executive recruitment consultancy Oakstone International, businesses face a perfect storm due to massive growth and a shortage of suitable candidates.  

With most industries becoming automated by tech, the demand for staff is constantly growing. As a result, many new recruitment companies have appeared in recent years. In addition, remote recruiting, primarily due to the pandemic, has sped up recruitment procedures.  

The recruitment market is increasingly competitive, and potential candidates are getting many more job offers than they were just three years ago. Decisions are typically being based on immediate financial motivation instead of career prospects.  

Companies are encouraged to invest enough time, money and expertise to attract the right people. If different employers offer potential employees roughly the same money, the candidates will make decisions based on leadership quality, market position and working conditions. 

Tristan Heywood, divisional director at Oakstone, comments: “I’ve been in this business for more than 21 years and I can’t remember a time when I was busier. What is very clear is that everyone is hiring, which is not only driving salaries up, but leading to candidates to make poor choices – and that situation is unlikely to change in the near future. 

“The single biggest challenge is that with not enough people for the volume of roles across every function – technically geared, engineering-related and sales – candidates get many more offers and typically will make decisions based on instant financial motivations rather than career prospects. 

“Some recruiters just throw CVs at businesses in their haste to conclude a deal, but we consider that akin to ‘people trading’ and we don’t cut corners. We invest time in finding the right person for each role – putting the wrong candidate up for interview not only damages our reputation but slows or stops the process.” 

Oakstone International divisional director Dan Hammond-Smith, added: “As we continue to move towards a hybrid working model, most clients who we partner with have adapted and adjusted. 

“Those that haven’t – and those that aren’t willing to – will lose candidates because employees are more than ever calling the shots about when they want to be in the office. People’s priorities have changed. 

“There is probably a 20 per cent increase in terms of base salaries within senior technology roles from even where we were last year – coupled expectations of bonus, decent pensions, investment in people’s betterment, learning and well-being – and you have a pretty competitive landscape. 

“At the start of 2021, the standard interview process within technology was 27.5 days – now, for most of my clients, it’s 14 days. That’s because they have now got to be even competitive in the market to succeed.” 

Share this article on social media

70% of employers agree that Ukrainian workers could ease UK labour shortage

In a new survey commissioned by UK career and jobs site Reed, research has shown that four in five UK businesses are willing to hire Ukrainian refugees with six in ten hiring managers stating that the government should make it easier for refugees to enter the UK.  

According to the research, UK employers believe the leading benefits of hiring Ukrainian workers are: 

  • An increase in Ukrainian workers could ease UK labour shortages (71%) 
  • The potential to increase workforce diversity (33%) 
  • The potential to increase cultural diversity (29%) 
  • Access to skilled and qualified candidates (27%) 

The language barrier is the biggest challenge, say 59% of recruitment decision-makers with other concerns including uncertainty about the Ukrainian workforce’s skillset (36%) and uncertainty about productivity (36%).  

In response to the research, Reed.co.uk has made some of its career advice pages available in Ukrainian to assist refugees in transitioning into the UK workforce.  

James Reed, Chairman of Reed.co.uk, commented:  “If Ukrainian refugees are to settle in the UK successfully, finding them employment will be the crucial next step to fully integrating them into society for the period that they remain here.  

“It’s encouraging to see such a positive response to this refugee crisis from UK employers. The majority are enthusiastic about the prospect of hiring Ukrainian workers and have identified a range of benefits they can bring to the UK workforce.”

Share this article on social media

Brazilian tech company wins international Work for Tomorrow award 

Brazilian start-up Labora Tech were announced as the winners of Work for Tomorrow, an international competition looking for the best innovations responding to longer and changing working lives.

The Work for Tomorrow competition was launched by The International Longevity Centre-UK (ILC) and is supported by the Innovation Resource Center for Human Resources. They received more than 60 submissions from organisations and individuals across 17 countries.

Labora Tech provides end-to-end HR technology, revolutionising recruitment by matching people to jobs based on their soft and hard skills and provides training, reskilling, and mentoring to ensure employees thrive in their new roles.

Through large scale recruitment drives, its approach reduces bias and supports career changes and flexibility at work.

With more than 20,000 adults already on the platform, the Sao Paolo-based company is looking to expand its business globally to encourage more employers to “retire the CV”, favouring a skills-based approach.

Considering the UK is battling skills shortages like never before, train-and-deploy as well a focus on hiring for soft skills could very well be what employers need to do to mitigate the lack of candidates in the job market.

Sérgio Serapiao, Co-Founder and CEO of Labora Tech, commented: “I am delighted and honoured to win this competition. The competition has shown the quality and power of initiatives all over the world. I am sure we can contribute a lot to codesign the future of work.”

“I truly believe Labora has developed a social technology that can reach a global scale, and make a positive impact to millions of people and thousands of companies, redefining how we work of tomorrow. This award reinforces that we are on the right track.”

Lily Parsey, Global Policy and Influencing Manager at ILC, said: “The world of work is shifting – and quickly. As our working histories become more complex, we’re more likely to change careers and reskill, we need to think about hiring in a new way. Labora Tech takes blind recruitment one step further by really putting skills, not biases, at the heart of recruitment. It’s long overdue that we move from judging people on their CVs to valuing what someone actually brings to a job.”

The second award given at the event was a “Community Award” given to Brave Starts. This UK based community platform helps adults try out new careers by providing them with information, linking them with professionals, and helping them build the right skills for their career leap.

Jodi Starkman, Executive Director of IRC4HR, said: “It has been an honour and a pleasure to support the Work for tomorrow programme. We have been inspired by the creativity and passion demonstrated by all of the competition participants and are especially excited to recognise Labora Tech and Brave Starts. Their innovations are critical to the work of today and tomorrow as we address the opportunities and challenges presented by longevity in all the places where people come together to accomplish shared goals.”

Share this article on social media

Inclusive working policies potentially adds £40 billion to GDP  

According to a new study by LinkedIn, greater workplace flexibility could help open up new employment opportunities for 1.3 million people in the UK with disabilities, caring responsibilities, and those based in rural locations. For those who may struggle to commute or work regular hours, the opportunity to work from home or work flexible hours has the potential to improve workforce inclusion while adding a potential £40 billion to GDP.

The research from the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR) was commissioned by LinkedIn in a bid to understand the potential for hybrid working to improve workforce inclusion. The research highlighted an “Inclusion Gap”, which revealed that employers are currently missing out on hiring people who would be able to work if working conditions were adapted to meet their needs.

Research from LinkedIn has found that for the majority (86%) of employers in the UK the pandemic has triggered a rethink of flexible and remote working, meaning that there is a real opportunity for businesses to design new policies with inclusivity at the core to make work equitable for all.

TRANSFORMING ACCESS TO THE WORKPLACE 
According to the study, flexible working could potentially unlock employment opportunities for around 600,000 people living with disabilities. This means that there is potential to add £20.7bn to the UK economy. Furthermore the next largest dividend of £10.6bn would be gained from employees from households with dependent children (around 284,000 people), followed by adult informal carers (around 306,000 people) and those based in rural locations (around 104,000 people), potentially adding £6bn and £2.9bn to the UK economy respectively.

Janine Chamberlin, UK Country Manager at LinkedIn, said: “The pandemic has instigated the greatest workplace change in a generation, prompting businesses of all types and sizes to re-evaluate how they operate.”

Nina Skero, Chief Executive at CEBR, said: “Our analysis highlights the enormous potential hybrid working arrangements hold for inclusivity in the UK labour market. The hybrid office model will, by no means, remove all the structural barriers faced by the highlighted demographic groups. Nonetheless, it does provide optimism for a more inclusive workforce. Realising this potential comes with its own challenges, however, and the onus falls on businesses to take initiative to ensure that inclusivity forms a key part of their agenda.”

LinkedIn Changemaker and disability inclusion consultant, Martyn Sibley, said: “Disabled people face many barriers in daily life. Workplace barriers are the most disabling for two reasons – because work provides us with financial independence and is also fulfilling mentally. Flexible working can help remove some of these barriers and create new employment opportunities, which is extremely positive for disabled people, employers and society as a whole. As companies consider what the future of work looks like, I’m hopeful that they will use this moment to redesign work to make it more inclusive for all.”

Steve Ingham, CEO at PageGroup, said: “Disabled individuals, which represent nearly 18% of the UK workforce, are more than capable of fulfilling many of the same jobs as able-bodied workers, yet, too often, inflexible workplace policies are a roadblock to accessing roles. The widespread move to working from home helped overcome access barriers in many cases, but companies must now challenge their hiring managers and leaders to explore options for truly flexible working. I’m proud to say that PageGroup has a dedicated team to help bridge the gap between businesses, disability charities and disabled candidates, helping to create more inclusive workplaces. We look forward to continuing to find great placements for people of all abilities – a lack of flexibility must not prevent UK businesses from employing the talent they need.”

James Taylor, Head of Strategy, Impact and Social Change, at disability equality charity, Scope, said: “For many disabled people, flexible home working is something they have been requesting for years with varying degrees of success depending on the employer. Inclusive policies such as flexible and remote working are hugely beneficial for many disabled employees, by allowing people to work in the most effective way for them and contribute their talent, skills and insight. It’s proved to be good for many employers as well, because businesses that are flexible thrive. We have seen the positive results and urge all employers to embrace this sea change and adopt flexible working practices to support more disabled people into work.”

Share this article on social media

TALiNT Partners today announced that the TIARA Talent Acquisition Awards Europe 2022 are now open for entries. 

Ken Brotherston, Chief Executive of TALiNT Partners made comment: “The 2021 TIARA Talent Acquisition Awards saw some incredible entries sharing their journeys through the challenges of the pandemic. It has been another truly remarkable year, and talent acquisition teams have had to be incredibly agile in responding to organisational and market changes, so we are delighted to have the opportunity to celebrate the fantastic work that Talent teams have delivered again this year.”

The TIARAs, renowned for excellence and innovation are now the biggest global awards series across the talent ecosystem and what sets them apart from other awards programmes is the rigorous judging process and that each finalist receives unique, detailed and confidential feedback from the judging panel, chaired by Lord Chris Holmes. This is something entrants deeply value as part of their TIARA experience.

The 10 Award categories offer recognition of excellence across all areas of talent acquisition, with a focus on critical resourcing activities that have driven transformation and organisational effectiveness.

Last year’s winners included Greene King, McDonald’s, Kraft Heinz, Essex County Council, Serco, North Yorkshire County Council, BBC, HSBC and L’Oréal. View last year’s winners and highly commended finalists here.

TALiNT Partners will capture some of the best and most innovative work TA teams have been doing and share this in the winners supplement of TALiNT International after the awards ceremony.

The TALiNT Partners Awards Platform makes the entry process straightforward in order that you can easily showcase your achievements through the tailored entry questions in each category.

You can find more information on how to enter here.

Winners will be revealed at the Awards Ceremony on Thursday 6th October taking place at the beautiful 5 star Montcalm Hotel, Marble Arch.

 

Share this article on social media

The TIARA 2022 Talent Tech Star Awards are now open for entries, recognising the best solutions for the HR and Recruitment industry. 

TALiNT Partners have announced that entries to the 2022 TIARA Talent Tech Star Awards are now open.

Commenting on the upcoming awards, Alex Evens, Managing Director of TALiNT Partners said: “After two years of accelerated adoption, talent tech has demonstrated the vital role it plays in improving processes for employers, recruiters and talent solution providers – and enhancing the human element. The value of the global HR Tech market is predicted to grow from $24 billion in 2021 to $35.68 billion in 2028 as the industry adapts to a new talent marketplace – but who will lead the market and drive innovation?

“The TIARA Talent Tech Star Awards shine a spotlight on the best HR and Recruitment technology solutions for employers, recruiters, candidates and contractors. This campaign recognises excellence across a spectrum of awards through five lenses – employee excellence, client service, innovation, growth and purpose – to demonstrate why they are market leaders and how they will scale impact.”

Last year’s Tech Star Awards winners included Pixid, MyDigital, Paiger, Talos360, Arctic Shores, Eli Onboarding, Clear Review, Sonovate, Firefish, Mercury xRM, and Odro (see who won which award here).

The judging process for the TIARA Talent Tech Star Awards is designed around the expectations of buyers and investors, based on key performance metrics, case studies and testimonials. An impressive and influential panel of judges from companies including LinkedIn, ManpowerGroup, SThree, AMS, and the HR Tech Partnership.

Ken Brotherston, CEO at TALiNT Partners also made comment: “The alumni of finalists and winners of the TIARA Talent Tech Star Awards represent challengers, disruptors and transformers across the spectrum of business growth, from high potential, early-stage start-ups to scaling SMEs. What they all have in common is great focus, execution, and ambition. They have validated game-changing innovation and excellent customer service with solid case studies and testimonials.

“This year we will once again celebrate the Talent Tech Stars who are championing innovation in different parts of the talent ecosystem and enabling employers and recruiters to adapt and transform. Our judges will look for good financial performance, well-executed innovation, customer service that’s a cut above, the best return on investment in people and profit with purpose.”

The 2022 TIARA Talent Tech Star Awards is supported by partners including Optima Corporate Finance, 3R, Deloitte and Marriott Harrison.

To find out more about this year’s award categories, judges and partners, as well as to enter, please visit https://talenttech.tiara.talint.co.uk/.

Share this article on social media

The Group’s footprint has expanded in the UK, Europe and APAC regions

In a move to expand its international provision of its recruitment operating systems, The Access Group has announced the acquisition of Vincere, which is a global provider of technology to over 20,000 recruitment consultants around the globe. The acquisition is the latest addition to Access Recruitment’s unique service offering and has significantly expanded their international reach across the UK and Europe, as well as the APAC region.

The Access portfolio has been developed and grown over time, and includes a host of acquisitions of a number of players in the recruitment sector. These include Safe Computing, Microdec, Volcanic and First Choice Software. As a division of The Access Group, Access Recruitment, supports agencies from start-ups to scale-ups and large enterprises by providing them with their technology that incorporates the entire front to back-office ecosystem.

Paul Vogel, Managing Director of Access Recruitment commented: “Vincere has built an impressive business serving customers across the globe with their intuitive and pioneering recruitment software. We are excited to welcome Vincere to Access and we look forward to working collaboratively to deliver the best customer outcomes as we accelerate our vision to become the number one provider of recruitment technology in the world. The experienced talent and service capabilities within Vincere will certainly complement our existing wealth of recruitment experience in the Access team”.

Bernie Schiemer, Founder and CEO of Vincere made comment: “We have spoken openly about our ambitions for Vincere to become the clear leader globally in our space. To make that a reality and more than just hot air, we needed to partner with a heavyweight who shares our vision of providing a single operating system for the front, middle and back office of recruitment firms, on a global scale. Access Recruitment’s heritage in the temp space, plus their strength in key areas such as payroll and compliance, made them the natural choice and puts our current momentum on steroids.

“This acquisition puts the mighty Access machine behind us and turns Vincere into an unstoppable force. There are now no limits on how far we can take the platform and the experience we can provide to our customers. The entire Vincere team here is thrilled to join the Access Group.”

 

Share this article on social media
Will this emotive move backfire and result in an increase of absences?

This week, IKEA’s decision to cut pay for unvaccinated staff who have to self-isolate because of COVID-19 exposure, and in some cases for those who contract the virus as well, will come into force. The move comes as firms struggle with mass staff absences and rising related costs due to the highly transmissible Omicron variant. Sick pay cuts will be implemented at Wessex Water.

But is the move about mitigating staff shortages? Or is it discrimination against the unvaccinated?

Employment lawyer Sarah Ozanne, of CMS, believes it is about tackling staff shortages: “This action [by IKEA] seems more of a reaction to staff shortages and how to manage them than any intended ‘discrimination’ of the unvaccinated,” she said. However, she also warned of complex legal issues and said striking the right balance is difficult.

She made further comment: “…employers should consider whether their actions are proportionate as a means of achieving the aim of getting employees back into work.”

According to news reports, unvaccinated workers at IKEA, who do not have mitigating circumstances, who test positive will be paid in line with company sick pay. Unvaccinated workers, without mitigating circumstances and required to isolate after being identified as a close contact, could now receive as little as £96.35 a week which is the Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) minimum. With average weekly wages at IKEA between about £400 and £450 (location dependent), staff get enhanced sick pay. This massive gap in weekly pay could lead to staff not reporting a close contact and attending work, therefore exacerbating the staff shortage issues by potentially transmitting the virus anyway.

In a statement defining ‘mitigating circumstances’, the retail giant that employs about 10,000 people in the UK said: “Fully vaccinated co-workers or those that are unvaccinated owing to mitigating circumstances which, for example, could include pregnancy or other medical grounds, will receive full pay. Unvaccinated co-workers without mitigating circumstances that test positive with COVID-19 will be paid full company sick pay in line with our company absence policy. Unvaccinated co-workers without mitigating circumstances who have been identified as close contacts of a positive case will be paid Statutory Sick Pay.”

TALiNT International reached out to Olivia Sinfield, a partner at Osborne Clark LLP for comment. She said: “Cutting sick pay for unvaccinated staff required to isolate due to ‘close contact’ is being considered as potentially a more viable measure to address the issue of staff absences than issuing of vaccination mandates in the UK.  Vaccination mandates remain, in the UK, largely a legal no go zone except in outlier cases involving health and caring professions.  If anything, the mandating of vaccinations is trickier to justify now on health and safety grounds since the Omicron variant swept the nation over the festive period infecting and being transmitted by the vaccinated and unvaccinated alike.”

“When considering cutting sick pay for unvaccinated employees who are self-isolating, employers need to look carefully at what’s in black and white in terms of any contractual sick pay scheme and how this has been operated in the past. Where there is a genuine built-in discretion which has been relied upon in the past then arguments of breach of contract and – worst case scenario, resignations and constructive unfair dismissal claims may be avoided (provided a decent process is followed in rolling out the new rules). In contrast, where sick pay has been paid out historically without much thought around the ‘why’s’ and the ‘for whom’ then hands may be tied, and legal claims follow any attempts now to fetter circumstances where sick pay is paid.”

Share this article on social media

Pandemic has exacerbated gender inequality

A detailed report, produced by Sharon Peake, founder and CEO at Shape Talent, has exposed why women in the workplace across Britain and Europe have been so severely impacted by COVID-19.

Sharon Peake, founder and CEO at Shape Talent, said: “The fact is: pre-existing gender inequalities have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic and many of the hard-earned gains in women’s equality in the workplace, particularly at leadership levels, have been eroded. Women, the world over, are exhausted by the impact of gender bias.”

Predictions by The World Economic Forum expect that the gender pay gap is not going to close for another 136 years, as a direct impact of the pandemic. This is an increase of 36 years on the previous Global Gender Gap Report, which predicted 99.5 years.

Peake explained: “Since time began, gender equality has been viewed as a women’s issue and the focus has been on how to ‘fix’ women. This report does not exist to tell us how unacceptable this is – it is here to provide business leaders with the insight that can focus their strategies on sustainable change and ultimately accelerate gender equality.”

The paper outlines the three barriers that are summarised below:

  • Societal barriers: Subtle and often unspoken cultural cues and messages that reinforce the ways that men and women ‘ought’ to think, behave and feel
  • Organisational barriers: The hurdles experienced in the workplace and a combination of systemic obstacles, cultures and norms which disadvantage women
  • Personal barriers: A diverse range of hindrances, including how women present in the workplace and how they manage the work-family interface.

The paper lists eight guiding principles companies can adopt to counteract the barriers; these are:

  1. Link inclusion and diversity to business strategy
  2. Set the tone from the top
  3. Make inclusion part of cultural change programme
  4. Take an evidence-based approach
  5. Engage men
  6. Build and accelerate the pipeline
  7. Enable a level playing field
  8. Narrow the focus
Share this article on social media

Trending Stories

Talent Solutions

Despite efforts there is still massive room for improvement in UK management and reporting

In research released today, findings reveal a lack of focus on progressing diversity in the workplace. In the study conducted by SD Worx, it was found that while 68% of UK companies are committed to removing unconscious bias in the recruitment process, many have failed to implement a reporting system to track progress on meeting ED&I objectives.

The survey revealed that only 26% of UK companies evaluate managerial commitment to achieving ED&I-related objectives. A further 32% admitted having no systems allowing employees to report discrimination.

The UK ranked third in its commitment to removing unconscious bias at 68% when it comes to ranking. Ireland ranked first at 74%, with Belgium coming in second, at 69%.

As far as rankings for equal access to training, the UK is slightly lower than other countries, with 64% of companies investing in equal access to training and development. Ireland (72%), Belgium (71%), and Poland (69%) topped the list.

While 64% of UK companies include transparency about ED&I goals and actions to attract a diverse workforce in their mission statement and corporate values, only 60% of the UK companies surveyed said that they promote ED&I in job advertisements, social media, and their websites.

The survey also revealed that countries vary in their level of focus concerning educating and involving managers in their ED&I policies. For example, in the UK, 60% of companies stated that they actively involve their managers in ED&I policies, and 60% provide internal training on the topic.

Colette Philp, UK HR Country Lead at SD Worx commented: “It’s no longer enough for businesses to say they prioritise diversity and inclusion. Instead, they must prove their commitment to achieving a more diverse workforce, both internally within their business and externally to attract talent.”

“There is more awareness than ever before regarding diversity in the workplace and it’s a deciding factor for many when it comes to searching for a role or staying with a business. A diverse workforce brings new experiences and perspectives and an inclusive environment allows individuals to thrive. If businesses aren’t already putting ED&I as a top priority, it’s essential they act now to do so.”

Jurgen Dejonghe, Portfolio Manager SD Worx Insights, added: “It’s important that companies start investing in an active reporting system about their actions concerning diversity, equality and inclusion. On the one hand, that data offers a strong basis for optimising the diversity policy with concrete and consciously controlled actions. On the other hand, such a system also provides clear evidence whether companies are effectively putting their money where their mouth is and not making false promises to (future) employees.”

For ED&I initiatives to be successful, change needs to come from the top, with proper rollouts and reporting system to track their progress.

Share this article on social media

TALiNT Partners has announced the finalists for the 2022 TIARA Talent Solutions Awards with 22 of the United States’ best Talent Solutions, MSP & RPO firms shortlisted across eight award categories.

The finalists for the 2022 Talent Solutions Awards US, which spotlight MSP, RPO and Talent Solutions providers delivering excellence in recruitment and talent acquisition across the US, are the top of the crop and represent the very best in providers in the industry.

Ken Brotherston, Chief Executive of TALiNT Partners made comment: “Following the inaugural TIARA Talent Solutions Awards US last year, I am delighted to see many of our 2021 finalists return to celebrate their achievements, as well as a number of new entrants this year. The 2022 Awards are a true celebration across the market, from the large global players to newer entrants and niche RPO organizations, all demonstrating excellence in their impact for employers and their own employees.”

“The TIARAs are distinguished by the rigor of its judging process and the quality of its judging panel,” he added. “Entries will be assessed by our esteemed judges through six key metrics: excellence in delivery; innovation; DE&I impact; sustainable value; business growth; and purpose.”

What sets the TIARAs apart from other awards programs is their independent panel of expert judges and individual feedback given back to each finalist.

The judges for this year’s TIARA Talent Solutions Awards are drawn from the HR and Talent Acquisition community are:

  • Sachin Jain, Senior Director – Global Talent Management, PepsiCo
  • Andrew Brown, Director RPO and Recruiting, Cornerstone
  • Russell Griffiths, General Manager, Coleman Research
  • Rich Genovese, Global Head – Talent Identification & Discovery, Jazz Pharmaceuticals
  • Gregg Schneider, Senior Manager – Procurement Plus, Global Talent Marketplace and Innovation Lead, Accenture
  • Justin Brown, Talent Acquisition Project Manager, Gallagher
  • Chris Farmer, Global Program Owner, Salesforce
  • Kerri Arman, Former VP Global Head of Talent, American Express Global Business Travel
  • Saleem Khaja, COO and Co-Founder, WorkLLama
  • Fitzgerald Ventura, CEO, 1099Policy
  • Mike Wilczak, Chief Product Officer, iCIMS

Judges will convene in May to debate and decide the winner of each category Award as well as an overall Talent Solutions Provider of the Year. All winners will be announced at an exclusive virtual awards ceremony on Thursday June 9th, 18:00 EDT.

Winners will also be profiled in a special TIARA Awards supplement published with TALiNT International.

The TIARA 2022 campaign is supported by our headline partner Cornerstone, and sponsored by WorkLLama, 1099Policy, and iCIMS.

The full list of TIARA 2022 Talent Solutions Finalists can be viewed here.

Share this article on social media
Trials indicate increased productivity and employee wellbeing
Approximately 30 British companies will be taking part in a four-day work week trial has been launched in the UK as part of a global pilot organised by governments, think tanks, and the organisation ‘4 Day Week Global’. During the pilot, it’s said that employees will be offered 100% of their usual pay, for 80% of their time, yet maintaining 100% productivity. Studies have shown that the four-day week can boost productivity and employee wellbeing.
Harriet Calver, Senior Associate at Winckworth Sherwood, says that the four-day work week is not a new phenomenon. Many employees in the UK already work a four-day week, however, this is typically agreed on a case-by-case basis between employee and employer following a flexible working request. It tends to be accompanied by a corresponding reduction in pay, except in the case of “compressed hours” in which case the employee is simply squeezing the same number of hours into a shorter week.

BENEFITS FOR BUSINESS 

Gill Tanner, Senior Behavioural Scientist at CoachHub, believes that one of the key advantages is that employees would benefit from a better work/life balance and an extra day on the weekend would mean staff would have the opportunity to realise other ambitions outside of work and spend more meaningful time with family and friends, engage in more exercise or find a new hobby – all of which result in improved mental and physical health and higher levels of happiness. And this will result in less burnout and reduced levels of stress.

But in what ways could the reduced working week benefit employers? Improving employee happiness and well-being has many potential commercial benefits for employers such as increased performance and productivity, reduced absenteeism, recruitment and retention; and it could have a positive effect DE&I.

POTENTIAL DRAWBACKS

Gill Tanner believes that completing five days’ worth of work in just four days could be more stressful for some. Employees will need more focus and have much less time for lower productivity activities.  Additionally, some employers and businesses may find the four-day week detrimental to operations. For example, a decline in levels of customer support on days staff aren’t in the office. So, careful thought needs to be given to how this might be executed.

According to Harriet Calver, if an organisation is asking for 100% productivity from employees in consideration for a reduction in working hours, it is going to be critical to have the right support, technology and workplace culture in place to enable this.

Although the success of the four-day working week model relies on employees doing fewer hours, there is a danger that there may not be enough hours in those four days to complete the work. Therefore, working hours could creep up to previous levels if the workload is the same, resulting in longer and more stressful days for these employees.

In customer facing businesses, a potential pitfall of the four-day working week is not being able to properly service customers leading to poor customer satisfaction. For example, if an organisation shuts its office on the fifth day, when it was previously open, customers may complain they cannot access services when they want to, or previously could. Whilst this could be a potential issue for some organisations, it should be overcome fairly easily by most simply by keeping the business open for five days a week but staggering the days which employees do their four days so the entire week is still covered.

According to Gill Tanner, employers should consider the following before implementing a four-day week:

  1. What are your reasons for implementing a four-day week?
  2. Consult with employees and other stakeholders regarding a four-day week. What are their thoughts? How might it work?
  3. Provide clarity regarding what is expected in terms working hours, performance levels, days off, remuneration, ways of working etc.
  4. Ensure there is sufficient coverage to run the business as is required and to have continuity.
  5. Think about the situation from the customer/client perspective (and other stakeholders) and how they might be affected
  6. Consider the communication plan: who needs to be communicated to and by when?
  7. Reflect on your current company culture.  Is it one of trust and ownership, values that are key to this kind of working? If not, is it the right time to implement such a big transition?  Are there other steps you need to take first?
Share this article on social media

At the beginning of every new year, everyone wants to give their two-pennies worth when it comes to what to expect in the months ahead. Ken Brotherston, TALiNT Partners’ CEO has given us his.

I love reading new year predictions; they typically have a common theme of how this year will be the most important year ever for [enter your profession]…

For talent acquisition leaders this isn’t true – at least I hope it isn’t because 2021 was your most important year. It was where chronic and acute collided, creating demands on talent acquisition and resourcing teams like never before and the importance of what they were doing had an immediate impact on the economy and society. Hiring to get jabs into arms, bread into supermarkets and petrol into garages are just three examples that spring to mind.

However, whilst 2022 may not be as mission critical as the last eighteen months, it will still be hugely important. This will be the year where employers’ responses to the disruption of the recent past will become evident: policies on unvaccinated workers, flexible and remote working strategies, and the pivot to a focus on skills rather than experience and the how these impact attrition and attraction will all become evident. For those employers who have got it right (or at least not as wrong as many others), there will be a dividend in the form of a more stable employee base with a resultant increase in productivity and competitiveness.

The biggest question for many talent acquisition leaders will be: “How long is the current market going to last?” In the UK the Institute of Employment is already saying the labour market has stalled, despite low headline unemployment figures. Now, whilst there isn’t a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach, it does seem prudent to try and look beyond the current (quite possibly terrifying) number of open requisitions most organisations have and at least think about the implications for a slowing employment market.

My own guess is that we will run hot until the summer and then start to notice certain industry or job-family roles slow down more rapidly in Q3/4. Certain industries will have much longer to run – the green economy is only justgetting going and tourism and travel clearly have a long way to go to get back to pre-pandemic levels.

But nevertheless, the speed with which demand increased in late 2020 can easily go in the opposite direction if, for example, inflation really does take hold.

So, whilst we will hopefully avoid 2021’s relentless pressure to deliver, there is still important work to be done. Talent acquisition and resourcing functions more than proved their worth last year and will have another opportunity to do the same again this year, but perhaps with a more strategic approach. But whatever lies ahead I confidently predict it won’t be dull!

Share this article on social media