Tag: employee development

72% of senior staff admit to lack of training and development  
Learning and development programmes need urgent attention according to CoachHub’s 2021 Global HR Survey.

To meet the demands of today’s workforce, companies need to adapt to the needs of individual employees and research has revealed that only two in five companies do this. Almost half (45%) of businesses only provide standardised offerings to all workers and employees aren’t happy with their current training programmes; with 72% of those in senior training and development roles admitting that their staff feel there is a lack of training and development initiatives.

Almost all (92%) respondents believe that training and development budgets will increase in the year ahead, which is creates great opportunities to grow and develop organisations.

Juliane Sterzl, Senior Vice president for EMEA at CoachHub said: “Currently, organisations do not appreciate the full potential of training and development programmes that are out there. While minor adjustments following widespread remote working were implemented, many solutions were simply digitally-adapted rather than being digital first by design. Today, workers need more sophisticated, personalised approach.”

Almost all leaders (97%) believe that it is important to adapt their employee training and development programme to the current business climate with 77% of respondents agreeing that there is a great need to invest in employee training and development post pandemic and remote working.

The survey results show that 70% of decision makers identify that their employees are interested in a return to face-to-face learning and training following a switch to digital during the pandemic. “The large proportion of people longing for face-to-face contact actually signals that we’re craving more human interaction and collaboration than some of the digital tools allow. It’s not about ditching digital development completely, but instead better marrying the convenience and increased accessibility that digital platforms provide, with the real interactions that we once associated with physically meeting with people,” commented Sterzl.

 

 

Share this article on social media

Collaboration and communication are key skills  

According to new research from LinkedIn, 87% of UK business leaders stated that young workers have been plagued by a “developmental dip” because of long periods of time working from home during the pandemic.  

250 C-level executives in the UK (from companies with 1,000 employees and more and with an annual turnover of £250+ million) who were surveyed for the study, found that almost 30% of business leaders feel that onboarding from home has been a challenge for young employees. A further 42% of leaders believe that young people’s ability to build meaningful relationships with colleagues while working remotely has been difficult. 

Out of practice  

A complementary survey of young professionals showed that they agree. 69% of young people (aged 16 – 34) believe their professional learning experience has been impacted by the pandemic. More than half of those asked to return to offices feel their ability to make conversation at work has suffered, and 71% say they’ve forgotten how to conduct themselves in an office environment. 84% of young workers ultimately feel “out of practice” when it comes to office life, especially when it comes to giving presentations (29%) and speaking to customers and/ or clients (34%).  

Missing out 

Business leaders say the key development experiences that young people have missed out on during the pandemic include learning by “osmosis” from being around more experienced colleagues (36%), developing their essential soft skills (36%), and building professional networks (37%).  

Skills to succeed 

Business leaders believe that for hybrid working to be a success, collaboration (59%) and communication (57%) are the two most important skills employees need. Nearly half (49%) of leaders say working closely with experienced team members is the best way for young people to catch up and build these soft skills.  

Janine Chamberlin, UK Country Manager at LinkedIn, said:  It’s positive to see leaders recognise the disproportionate impact the pandemic has had on young people as they consider their future workplace policies. To help young people develop the skills they need to succeed, companies must understand where the skills gaps are, introduce mentoring schemes and bolster learning experiences that cater for a hybrid workforce to help younger workers get back on track.”

Photo courtesy of Canva.com

Share this article on social media